Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Rich Dad's Rich Kid, Smart Kid: Giving Your Child a Financial Head Start Audio CD – Abridged, Audiobook


See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Library Binding
"Please retry"
Audio CD, Abridged, Audiobook
CDN$ 23.70 CDN$ 23.70

Join Amazon Student in Canada



Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Hachette Audio (March 1 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1586210947
  • ISBN-13: 978-1586210946
  • Product Dimensions: 14.2 x 12.4 x 2.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 159 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (68 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,834,978 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
First Sentence
Both my dads were great teachers. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Justin Belkin on Jan. 13 2004
Format: Paperback
Our current education system fails to adequately teach our children the financial skills necessary to survive later on in life. Robert Kiyosaki wrote Rich Kid, Smart Kid to fill those gaps. The fundamental premise of the book is that all children are born smart and rich. The goal of education is to bring out that natural genius within our children. Awakening this genius inside of us is a sure way to become happy. Therefore, being happy through realizing our innate potential is more fulfilling than being rich and unhappy. Rich Dad said, "If you are not happy while getting rich, chances are you will not be happy when you get rich. So whether you are rich or poor, make sure you are happy" (14).
The root of the current problem lies in America's transitioning from an Industrial society into an Information society. Kiyosaki explains the need for transitioning our thought, "In the Information Age, what you know becomes obsolete very quickly. What you learned is important, but not as important as how fast you can learn, change, and adapt to new information" (xi). These structural changes tangibly affect us regardless of whether or not we acknowledge them. Some of the problems facing tomorrow's youth include social security, healthcare, increased risk of obsolesce through increased specialization, and the need for lifelong education. Education must adjust with the times.
Currently, our education system teaches scholastic and professional skills. Scholastic education focuses on the ability to read, write, and do arithmetic. Professional education trains students for high-level careers later on in life. However, this Western brand of education fails our children in some crucial ways. Rich Dad said, "The child learns by doing, making mistakes, and then learning" (238).
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Katie on Dec 8 2002
Format: Paperback
As I read other reviews, I could relate to them all. Rich Kid Smart kid was extremely redundant (I could repeat to you all of the sayings he said over and over), his anecdotes I could have done without, and he advertised himself a ton. It also bugged me how many times he said he was a bestseller author. What a way to identify yourself.
However, I did think it was interesting and helpful. For some reason, I couldn't put it down when I read it. The anecdotes, although too prolific, were somewhat interesting. Before reading this book, I didn't even know you could invest in Real Estate, and he went into how and what you do a little bit. The section on self-perception and different geniuses was very interesting. I think if all kids knew that they were smart, just not in every way, there would be a lot less self-esteem problems. I think it would also help teachers be patient with kids that are labeled "troublemakers."
Although I enjoyed reading Rich Kid Smart Kid for the most part, and it did make me feel smart after I read it, I was annoyed at the posed questions that were never answered. Where do I get the money to invest? It sounded like the money he started out with just appeared, which I know didn't happen. I also wish he would have explained Asset, Liabilities, Income, and Expenses in a little more detail. Instead, he referred to his other books, which I probably won't read. The part I learned most from was when he put the situations into a real-life senario. It also bothered me how he said he wasn't writing a book on parenting, when he was dishing out an awful lot of advice.
Overall, the book was interesting and it might be the way to a good start in your child's financial life, but that doesn't help me too much. I think I would have benefitted from this book a lot more if it had been more answers than questions, but that may have been the reason it was quick reading.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By D. McGrath on April 1 2004
Format: Paperback
Thank goodness it wasn't in slow-motion!
This is the fourth book of Mr. Kiyosaki's I have read. The ideas in all of these books could have fit in to one.
So why read this one? I couldn't tell ya
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By Josh Fierro on March 24 2004
Format: Paperback
This book was very insightful to parents all across the world. It teaches parents that in order to be successful in the financial world and the buisness world, you have to have a good education. (...)
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By A Customer on Jan. 5 2004
Format: Paperback
This book is good if you want to know how to become rich and succesful. It's the key to help parents teach their children how to become financially stable. Its divided into three parts and in each talks about different methods to becoming successful. Although it repeats itself many times it proves the point on how to become successful. He writes about how if father had a good education but was poor. It also explains that you don't need an education to be rich, the only thing you need is to know how to get rich or the methods that help you to do so. This book guides you towards that directon.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback
I liked this book because it teaches the reader how to teach their children about money and how to use it. By giving the child such things as power of his/her money can help the child learn instead of giving an hour long lecture about saving. This book also advances on what was said in the first one "Rich Dad Poor Dad" by puting the reader in the teachers seat instead of the students. So in the long run both the partent and the child is learning from this book. And that is why I gave it five stars.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By A Customer on Jan. 4 2004
Format: Paperback
Kiyosaki wrote this book to give parents financial strategies on how to give their children a financial head start.The book is written in three parts. The first part ocuses on financial and academic education. The second part focuses on helping parents give their children a head start for their journey to financial literacy. The third part tells parents ways in which they can find out how to educate their children best. He talks about his two fathers; his real father and his rich father. His real father told him to get an education to obtain a good job. His rich father always told him that he had to make his money work so that he would never be in debt and that way succeed. Overall it gives strategies to become wealthy by managing your money correctly.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Product Images from Customers

Most recent customer reviews

Search


Feedback