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Riding Freedom [Paperback]

Pam Munoz Ryan , Brian Selznick
4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (60 customer reviews)
List Price: CDN$ 7.99
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Book Description

Sept. 1 1999 Scholastic Signature
A fictionalized account of adventurous Charlotte Parkhurst, who disguised herself as a boy at the age of 12 and ran away from a grim orphanage for boys. Charlotte had a special way with horses and managed to work her way up to fulfilling her dream of raising horses on a ranch of her own. Still disguised as a man, she became the first woman ever to vote.

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Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

PW's starred review called this fictionalized biography of equestrian Charlotte "Charley" ParkhurstAwho lived her life disguised as a man and was the first woman voter in the U.S.Aan "ebullient and tautly structured novel that moves along at a gallop." Ages 8-12. (Sept.)
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal

Grade 4-6?This fictionalized biography of the first woman to vote in the state of California, and perhaps in the whole United States, is fascinating. Charlotte Parkhurst, known as Charley, spent most of her life masquerading as a man. Raised in an orphanage where she is the only girl, she is prevented from being adopted by the staff, who put her to work in the kitchen. Her own predilection is to be with the horses and the elderly man who cares for them. Vern's tales of escaping slavery are the seeds of Charlotte's own desperate bid for freedom after her only other friend is adopted. Her knack with horses soon enables the disguised Charley to pursue her dream of driving a stagecoach. She does it so well that she is admired and sought after, and is offered the opportunity to earn a livelihood in the California gold fields. Many trials arise, including the loss of sight in her left eye, but throughout, Charlotte remembers her friends, works hard and persistently, and fulfills her ambitions, culminating in her voting in a presidential election. The author provides a compact and exciting story about real people who exemplify traits that readers admire. A concluding note tells more about the historical facts surrounding Parkhurst's life, but kids will read it just for the adventure. The full-page, black-and-white pencil drawings are well rendered and enhance the straightforward text.?Carol A. Edwards, Minneapolis Public Library
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
AFTER TEN YEARS AT THE ORPHANAGE, Charlotte wasn't like most girls her age. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
4.8 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Breath taking adventure story based on true events April 11 2004
Format:Paperback
In the 1880's Charlotte "Charley" Darkey Parhurst took a lifetime adventure. Raised in an orphanage of all boys, Charlotte had a hard life working in the kitchen and was stuffed in the potato bin in the kitchen so she wouldn't be adopted. Life is bearable but once her best friend is adopted and she's left alone, she decides to do something about it. Charlotte loves horses and runs away and becomes a stable boy. While working there, her boss, Mr. Ebeneezer, teachers her how to be a coachman. To make her living and have a successful life she poses as a man and becomes a stage coach driver. Traveling from Massachutes to California, posing as "Charley" allows her to attain her dream of owning her own land. She is even the first woman to vote in the 1868 California presidential election, even though she is poseing as a man. This is a fictionalized biography with excellent drawings by Brian Selznick. Students who love horses will not be able to put this book down, as well as those who love adventure. This is a breath taking adventure story based on true events that readers grades 4 and up can appreciate.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Riding Freedom is a GREAT book Sept. 16 2003
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
Riding Freedom Scholastic Press, 1998, 138pp., $4.99 Pam Munoz Ryan ISBN # 0439087961
What happens to a girl do when she is living in a place where there are only boys? She gets teased.
"In the mid-eighteen hundreds, when the East was young and the West was yet to be settled, a baby was born, named Charlotte. When she was nothing more than a bundle, she surprised her parents and puzzled the doctor by surviving several fevers. Folks said that any other baby would have died, but Charlotte was already strong. She walked before most babies crawled. She talked before most babies babbled, and she never cried. Unless someone took something away from her."
Riding Freedom is a fictional biography about a girl, Charlotte Parkhurst, who was an orphan. She was taken to a boys orphanage because there were no girls orphanages back then. She had to do many chores because she was the only girl there, apart from the cook. She always got back at the boys for teasing her though because every Saturday there would be a horse race at the orphanage and no matter what, Charlotte won the race. Charlotte loved horses. Her favorite horse at the orphanage was called Freedom. Charlotte liked her life at the orphanage until something bad happened to Freedom. The story goes on to describe Charlotte's life at the orphanage and then as she grows up.
The book is full of exciting and unexpected events that keeps the reader wanting to keep on reading. You admire Charlotte for never giving up even when things get tough. Anyone who likes adventure stories and likes horses will enjoy reading this book.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Riding Freedom! May 28 2003
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
Riding freedom by Pam Munoz Ryan is a great book for realistic fiction readers. It has a strong relationship between horses and a young girl named Charlotte, or should I say Charley. Throughout the book she tries to disguise herself as a boy, so she can work with horses.
In the book we learned that freedom is never too far to grasp for a moment. We know this because throughout the book she runs away. She ran away from an orphanage and met a man. She believed this is her ticket to freedom.
In the mid 1800's her ticket, a man named Ebeneezer gives her a chance to be free forever in Rhode Island. Then Mr. Millshark (the orphan owner) will never get her back. Throughout the book it shows male to female differences. Charlotte is a proud girl but is forced to disguise her self as a boy, to be able to work with her beloved horses.
Charlotte then gets a chance to go to Rhode Island. Will she go? I know the answer but you will have to read Riding Freedom by Pam Munoz Ryan to find out!
Know I would like to give some credit to the author Pam Munoz Ryan. She wrote when Mariana sings witch won the APA award. Pam currently lives in San Diego. Riding Freedom Witch won the National Willa Cather award. She has written 25 books, a great accomplishment!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Riding Freedom by Pam Munoz Ryan May 27 2003
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
May 27 2003

In my opinion, and probably in the opinions of millions of others, it is astonishing how an author such as Pam Munoz Ryan can intertwine humor, love, determination, and the complete essence
of life into a single piece of literature. This authors writing,
Riding Freedom, is a timeless tale that flows into the means of goals and the strain to accomplishing them.
Made an orphan by a tragic accident, Charlotte Parkhurst lives in a world filled with privilege and wild days. Charlotte was born and now proudly owns a unique talent for taming horses, but after ten years of this life in addition to a horrid loss, she yearns for what lies beyond the orphanage. Her role as a mere female has somewhat limited her and her dreams. So she devises a clever plan to be free. As this character puts it, "I... I need... a pair of scissors." Scissors? Scissors for some master plan? What could scissors do? How could they help? They cut hair of course. And girl's hair can be awfully long, but if it's short, you can look amazingly like a boy...
In her discrete disguise, she runs away to the northern state of Massachusetts. Led by fate and destiny, she meets the man Ebeneezer. Under his talented wings, her almost abnormal skill with horses is sharpened. She learns and her life continues with a slight ease. Despite this, Charlotte, now Charley to the public, shakes hands unreadily with tragedy. Despite her freak collide with catastrophe, she carries on and strains to continue her way of life as she feels she needs it. But how far into her new methods of existing will she go until her world is destroyed by her new weakness? Will she be forced back to the orphanage? And what goals can she achieve to win her destiny?
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Most recent customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Exciting Biographical Story
Reason for Reading: Read aloud to the 9yo as part of our history curriculum.

Comments: This is a fictionalized biography of the life of Charley Parkhurst , a renowned... Read more
Published on Aug. 13 2009 by Nicola Mansfield
5.0 out of 5 stars Honsetly an Awsome Book
When I was in 4th grade I hade to write a book report on any book i wanted. I chose this book because the book cover really caught my attention. Read more
Published on May 24 2004 by Erica E.
5.0 out of 5 stars ATTENTION ALL HORSE LOVERS!!!!
Riding Freedom
ATTENTION ALL HORSE LOVERS!!!!!

Riding Freedom is about a girl named Charlotte that is a orphan that is at a boy orphanage. Read more
Published on Jan. 29 2004
5.0 out of 5 stars the best book
i love this book you should to read it dont just look at the pictures i does not tell you anything just read you will see what fun it is
Published on Nov. 30 2003
5.0 out of 5 stars A captivating and intriguing book
After my 9-year old checked this book out of her school library and finished it within one week because, in her words, "I couldn't put it down" and "It's the best book I've every... Read more
Published on Nov. 8 2003 by "truthrules3"
4.0 out of 5 stars Book review for Riding Freedom
Book Review
Pam Munoz Ryan has written over 25 books. She writes most of her books for young adults. The book Riding Freedom won the national willa Cather award. Read more
Published on May 27 2003
5.0 out of 5 stars Richard's best book ever
Riding freedom is the best book.I bet boys think this book is for girls,but I'm a boy and I loved this book. Read more
Published on May 7 2003
5.0 out of 5 stars Number The Stars
This book is really good and if your intersted in the World Warll you'd probably really want to read it. Read more
Published on May 5 2003
5.0 out of 5 stars Charley's Review of Freedom
This book is great. It has action and drama.It is a book that is right for everyone. I thought it was a great book. Everyone should read it.
Published on May 5 2003
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