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The Rise and Fall of Modern American Conservatism: A Short History Hardcover – Apr 25 2010


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Decent Political History of American Conservative Movement Aug. 24 2012
By J. Farley - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a decent biographical review of six prominent figures within the rise of the conservative movement during the 20th & 21st centuries (Robert Taft, William Buckley, Barry Goldwater, Phyllis Schlafly, Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush). It is pretty straightforward read, so I don't have much more to say. What I found most interesting were the descriptions of the early opposition to FDR's New Deal, the influence of the John Birch Society and other anti-communist conspiracy groups and the evolution of racial politics. I study American political history, and the author is honest in his presentation of both the good and bad elements of the conservative movement. It is clearly written for the general public. Not graduate-level reading, but I'm assigning it for undergraduates to read in a 200-level POLS course.


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