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The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt Paperback – Nov 20 2001


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 960 pages
  • Publisher: Random House Trade Paperbacks; New edition edition (Nov. 20 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0375756787
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375756788
  • Product Dimensions: 13.1 x 3.1 x 20.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 386 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (115 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #21,850 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

Praise for the rise of Theodore Roosevelt

“Magnificent . . . a sweeping narrative of the outward man and a shrewd examination of his character. . . . It is one of those rare works that is both definitive for the period it covers and fascinating to read for sheer entertainment. There should be a queue awaiting the next volume.”
-W. A. Swanberg, The New York Times Book Review

“Theodore Roosevelt, in this meticulously researched and beautifully written biography, has a claim on being the most interesting man ever to be President of this country.”
-Robert Kirsch, Los Angeles Times Book Review

“Spectacles glittering, teeth and temper flashing, high-pitched voice rasping and crackling, Roosevelt surges out of these pages with the force of a physical presence.”
-The Atlantic Monthly

“Morris’s book is beautifully written as well as thoroughly scholarly-clearly a masterpiece of American biography. . . . Hundreds of thousands will soon be reading this book . . . and will look forward, as I do, to Morris’s second volume.”
-Kenneth S. Davis, Worcester Sunday Telegram


From the Hardcover edition.

From the Back Cover

Praise for the rise of Theodore Roosevelt

“Magnificent . . . a sweeping narrative of the outward man and a shrewd examination of his character. . . . It is one of those rare works that is both definitive for the period it covers and fascinating to read for sheer entertainment. There should be a queue awaiting the next volume.”
-W. A. Swanberg, The New York Times Book Review

“Theodore Roosevelt, in this meticulously researched and beautifully written biography, has a claim on being the most interesting man ever to be President of this country.”
-Robert Kirsch, Los Angeles Times Book Review

“Spectacles glittering, teeth and temper flashing, high-pitched voice rasping and crackling, Roosevelt surges out of these pages with the force of a physical presence.”
-The Atlantic Monthly

“Morris’s book is beautifully written as well as thoroughly scholarly-clearly a masterpiece of American biography. . . . Hundreds of thousands will soon be reading this book . . . and will look forward, as I do, to Morris’s second volume.”
-Kenneth S. Davis, Worcester Sunday Telegram


From the Hardcover edition.

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First Sentence
ON THE LATE afternoon of 27 October 1858, a flurry of activity disturbed the genteel quietness of East Twentieth Street, New York City. Read the first page
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By James Gallen TOP 100 REVIEWER on Jan. 6 2004
Format: Paperback
"The Rise Of Theodore Roosevelt" tells the outstanding story of the pre-presidential years of this remarkable individual. In an attention-holding style, Morris relates the anecdotes known to all TR fans. In addition to the well known facts, Morris reveals lesser known facts which help us to understand TR and his career.
Beginning with he President's New Year's Day Reception of 1907, the book quickly jumps back to a very youthful TR. In the following pages we read of the close relationship between TR and his father. We read of the father who, by example and word, taught TR his greatest virtues of honesty, social responsibility and concern for others. It was this father who drove him through the streets of New York to get him over his asthma attacks as well as the one who told him that he "had the mind, but not the body" and that he must build his body. When TR was contemplating a scientific career, it was this father who told him that he could pursue such a career, "if I intended to do the very best that was in me; but that I must not dream of taking it up as a dilettante", but that he would have to learn to live within his means. Theodore Roosevelt, Sr.'s payment of a substitute during the Civil War left his son with a sense of guilt which could only be assuaged by his own military service. We learn of the shattering effect that this father's death had on the Harvard student. As president, TR would remark that he never took any serious step without contemplating what his father would have done.
Much attention is given to the "Roosevelt Museum of Natural History" assembled by the young taxidermist.
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By James Gallen TOP 100 REVIEWER on Jan. 6 2004
Format: Paperback
"The Rise Of Theodore Roosevelt" tells the outstanding story of the pre-presidential years of this remarkable individual. In an attention-holding style, Morris relates the anecdotes known to all TR fans. In addition to the well known facts, Morris reveals lesser known facts which help us to understand TR and his career.
Beginning with he President's New Year's Day Reception of 1907, the book quickly jumps back to a very youthful TR. In the following pages we read of the close relationship between TR and his father. We read of the father who, by example and word, taught TR his greatest virtues of honesty, social responsibility and concern for others. It was this father who drove him through the streets of New York to get him over his asthma attacks as well as the one who told him that he "had the mind, but not the body" and that he must build his body. When TR was contemplating a scientific career, it was this father who told him that he could pursue such a career, "if I intended to do the very best that was in me; but that I must not dream of taking it up as a dilettante", but that he would have to learn to live within his means. Theodore Roosevelt, Sr.'s payment of a substitute during the Civil War left his son with a sense of guilt which could only be assuaged by his own military service. We learn of the shattering effect that this father's death had on the Harvard student. As president, TR would remark that he never took any serious step without contemplating what his father would have done.
Much attention is given to the "Roosevelt Museum of Natural History" assembled by the young taxidermist.
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By Neil on Dec 18 2003
Format: Paperback
Many times we read pages written about presidents for example, and learn of their successes, failures, and moments while they were in office. This book does just the opposite of that, explaining his entire life up until the point of his presidency, focussing instead on how he became a great president rather than just how he was one. I have yet to purchase a book concerning TR's presidency, but I knew at about page 200 in this book that I would do so upon finishing it.
Yes, it's a lengthy book at 780 or so, but his life story is more than intriguing enough to keep you turning pages. Combine that with interesting anecdotes on other figures of the time period such as Marquis de Mores, Platt, and Lodge, and each chapter is interesting without a boring section of his life.
Lastly, through those small anecdotes, the book has now inspired my curiousity for the characters encountered in this book that were not fully explained. i.e. I'm looking to read books on the following characters listed above that weren't fully described (as it's not Morris' job in a biography of TR to do so). A book that peaks your curiousity in other subjects and people as well as the one you're reading about is a success in my opinion.
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By M. Swinney on July 30 2003
Format: Paperback
Like the great big bulk of a man that Theodore Roosevelt was, it took awhile to digest this hulk of a book. Which maybe a good thing to say about a 96 ounce steak, is not always a redeemable trait for literature. We want our casual readings to come easy, to whisk-fully be enjoyed, to turn the last page and say...why I had no idea this book was 780 pages. Such was not the case with Edmund Morris' "The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt,"...with this reader at least.
Morris does much to deify Teddy. And granted TR was a remarkable man with no equal in energy, drive, tenacity, and a touch of the silver spoon. However, Morris kneels down at the altar with bowed head so frequently that I'm afraid he missed a critical look at some of TR's faults. Leading up to the Spanish-American War over Cuban independence, Teddy was absolutely itching for a fight. Hell-bent on Jingoism, little is said critical of this war at all cost lust. Instead TR is credited for bringing the nation to war with scant a nod at diplomacy, and is made a demagogue in the American bellicose heart prevailing at that time. A great man would have pursued peace going unwantingly into war if necessary.
In Morris' deification of TR, some of Teddy's slightly racist views are inattentively glossed over. It can be written off with the statement that those viewpoints were prevalent at the time, but then the Earth being the center of the universe was prevalent during Galileo's time. Not that Teddy was one to go against the grain when needed, but in his earlier days, Teddy got the race issue wrong and little is made of it from Morris.
It's not all bad. I did give this one 4-stars after all. The reading is engaging along the way.
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