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Romeo Must Die


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1 new from CDN$ 24.99 6 used from CDN$ 3.71

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Product Details

  • Actors: Jet Li, Aaliyah, Isaiah Washington, Russell Wong, Delroy Lindo
  • Directors: Andrzej Bartkowiak
  • Writers: Eric Bernt, John Jarrell, Mitchell Kapner
  • Producers: Dan Cracchiolo, Ilyse A. Reutlinger, Jim Van Wyck, Joel Silver
  • Format: NTSC
  • Number of tapes: 1
  • MPAA Rating: R
  • Studio: Warner
  • VHS Release Date: May 6 2003
  • Run Time: 115 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (187 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 0790749998
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #16,919 in Video (See Top 100 in Video)

Product Description

Special Features

Documentary: 8 Short Documentaries (26:56) Featurette: Making of Romeo Must Die (15:00) Behind the Scenes (14:03) Music Video: Aaliyah's "Try Again" video (3:40) Making of Aaliyah's "Try Again" music video (4:11) Aaliyah/DMX "Come Back In One Piece" video (3:42) Other: Inside the Visual Effects Process (3:52) "Diary of a (Legal) Mad Bomber" (5:07) "Anatomy of a Stunt" (7:12) "The Sound Stage" (1:00) Theatrical Trailer: Sampler

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

By E. Laway on Jan. 24 2004
Format: DVD
This movie is perfect for what it tried and succeeded to achieve: Kung Fu Hip Hop. It doens't pretend to be more than what it is. It's loaded with well cheograped fight scenes curtesy of Cory Yuen, that's both inventive and unique. Imagine, kung fu touch football, a flying firehose, Jet Li puppeteering Aliyah to kick Francois Yip's rear end, and a whole lot of stuff thrown in. Although the plot can be virtually ignored like background music for the martial arts, it is essential in keeping the movie flowing. And the supporting cast is very A list, like Delroy Lindo, Russell Wong and Anthony Anderson who provides the comic relief. Ofcourse everyone will agree that the pairing of Li and Aliyah is impecable. They share such a sweet and innocent chemistry that it shows thru each time they are on screen together. The DVD extras does show evidence that they got along very well off screen and shared mutual admiration. Li even did a cameo on Aliyah music video. The DVD is really worth owning because it is the kind of movie that you can watch again and again when you are in the mood for it. All along you can't help but feel terrible about Aliyah's sudden death. How sad! Buy the DVD and consider it an homage to a pretty girl who could have had a really great acting career.
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Format: DVD
Most of you are wondering why I give this 4 stars, yet I stated that it is Jet Li's worst movie. B/c Jet Li has never starred in a bad movie, But if I had to rate his American flicks from best to worst, this one would be the worst. However, it is still a very enjoyable kung-fu flick to watch. This movie has some of the best martial arts fighting scenes I had ever scene. Jet Li is way better then Jackie Chan, but I still like Chan too. Its combines high flyin fighting with hip hop music. It delivers a great lesson about who you should trust and who you shouldn't because betrayal is one of the themes in this movie. Anyway here is the plot.
Han Sing is a former hong kong cop who is now a prisoner. Then one day he learns that his little brother Po, who lives in America, has been killed. Han escapes from jail and travels to America in search of his brothers killer. He comes to America at the same time his Father Chu'ing, and his buisness partner Isaac O'day (Delroy Lindo) who are also both rivals(inclding their families and friends), are fighting to own some piece of land. Upon his coming to merica, Han meets Isaac O'day's daughter, Trish (Aaliyah) whom he falls inlove with but also contributes problems betwwen the families. Then we also learn Han's backround about why he was an ex-cop who became a prisoner. It turns out that years before, his father, Ch'u Sing was a gangster in China and was gonna be put for trial. Chu knew he would recieve the death penalty, so Han managed to let him escape so his father would be able to get away and provide a better life for him and his little brother Po. His father fled to america w/ his brother, and Han was stripped from his badge and thrown in Jail for doing what he did. And back to what's going on right now, Later Trish's own Brother, Colin is later killed.
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Format: DVD
I'm a big fan of Jet Li, but I held off watching Romeo Must Die for a while in fear that a strong romantic plot a la Shakespeare would take away from the martial arts action I crave. I needn't have worried. This movie is many things, but a love story it is not. The two main characters do come together despite their families' undeclared war on each other, but it is more an act of survival and friendship than romance. This is primarily an action movie sprinkled with both kung fu fights and gunfights; unofficially, Romeo Must Die is a hip-hop kung fu film. Of course, there has to be some comedy thrown in to lighten things up, and a rather nebulous plot that leaves one feeling a step behind the story at all times gives it that classic martial arts flavor.
One thing this movie has is a great cast, including the two new-comers of sorts. For Jet Li, this was his first English-language leading role (although it was his 26th film overall), and for Aaliyah, it was her first of what should have been many more movies were it not for her untimely death a couple of years ago. The supporting players are great, particularly Delroy Lindo as African-American crime boss Isaak O'Day, a man who is trying to go legit only to see a turf war erupt between his posse and that of a neighboring Chinese crime family. Anthony Anderson steals the show, though, as O'Day's hilarious goon Maurice, shucking and jiving his way throughout the entire film, always rising to the comic occasion no matter how many times he loses a fight. Jet Li is Han Sing, a former Hong Kong cop who went to jail to allow his crooked father and brother to flee the island for America; when he learns that his little brother has been rubbed out, he makes a most interesting and enjoyable prison break in order to find his brother's killer.
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By A Customer on April 4 2003
Format: DVD
Funny enough, even though The Transporter doesn't feature the likes of Jet Li, Jackie Chan, or Donnie Yen in the lead role (the titular character is played by the delightfully cool Jason Statham, who could act circles around these guys), it's more of a true Hong Kong action film than anything those aforementioned actors have done in the U.S. You see, that movie didn't rely on quick cuts, wirework, computer generated images, or flashy camerawork, just good old and often innovative bone-crunching combat.
And much of Romeo Must Die lacks just that. I can think of five action sequences in the film involving Jet Li, and two of them are too silly to even mention (the hilariously bad football segment and the firehose fight) and one of them is overdone by too much flash (the prison escape). So what we get are two decent action sequences with Li and even they're not perfect, particularly the final fight with Russell Wong, which ends with hideous ten-foot, gravity-defying leaps. The plot's also a mess, never compelling enough to work in-between the fights and director Bartkowiak completely fails to build up any sort of momentum. The fight scenes come at irregular periods with an ebb and flow feel.
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