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Vln Ctos 4/5/Rondo Concertante

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Audio CD
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
Price: CDN$ 9.34 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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Product Details


1. I. Allegro
2. II. Andante cantabile
3. III. Rondeau (Andante grazioso - Allegro ma non troppo)
4. I. Allegro aperto
5. II. Adagio
6. III. Rondeau (Tempo di menuetto - Allegro)
7. Rondo for violin and orchestra in B flat K269/261a
8. Rondo for violin and orchestra in C K373
9. Adagio for violin and orchestra in E K261

Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars I hope a a genius does NOT write modern music Feb. 15 2004
By A. Park
Format:Audio CD
The honesty and truth of his works is what made Mozart a genius and his music exceptional and not, as the previous reviwer has stated, his use of advanced 'modern' harmonic developments. Technical refinements, feeling, taste - these things, though important, should not be considered ends in themselves. Many classical collectors have lost sight of the real end admist these things. It is music's integrity, and in its instruction of moral truths that should be one's only worthy end. Many artists today can play with emotion, skill and taste, but as wise listeners we should understand that these things are secondary to the humanity and integrity displayed in performances of works that have been inspired by such important truths. Oistrakh, as few artists do (especially today) understands this. When he performs he is not engaged in intellectual exercise, rather he makes music as music should be made: he instructs and brings to life the transcendent truths that these masters of old have been appropriately called masters for.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful Nov. 26 2003
Format:Audio CD
This is a beautifully played, selected, remastered, and priced recording of essential pieces of music.
I was wary of picking this up, because my experiences with budget classical releases have generally been bad: although the music is always wonderful, companies either get competent but uninspired performers, or transfer a legendary performer's recording (usually pretty old) to CD without taking any time to remaster it well.
Labels realize, I suppose, that there are two types of people who buy classical music: casual listeners that don't care about (or can't notice) such things, and a coterie of discerning obsessives who are willing to get fleeced for a good recording.
But EMI has actually done everyone a favor. This CD is a gift to a person starting a classical music collection, or anyone who just wants a beautiful recording of these pieces. Mozart's two greatest violin concertos are here, along with the alternate movements that he wrote for the same concertos - the disc actually fills its running time of 80 minutes, and it sounds glorious even on headphones. I'm not sure if it was a great remastering job or just an unusually sharp recording in the first place, but everything sounds bright and alive.
My knowledge of performers isn't that good, and I had never heard of David Oistrakh when I picked this up, but after a few listens I was convinced that he had to be a legend - which, unsurprisngly, he was (and is, I suppose). His tone is incredibly pure and smooth, and his playing retains the improvisatory feel of some of Mozart's continuously unspooling melodies while remaining disciplined and clear.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.9 out of 5 stars  8 reviews
33 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful Nov. 26 2003
By Gulley Jimson - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
This is a beautifully played, selected, remastered, and priced recording of essential pieces of music.
I was wary of picking this up, because my experiences with budget classical releases have generally been bad: although the music is always wonderful, companies either get competent but uninspired performers, or transfer a legendary performer's recording (usually pretty old) to CD without taking any time to remaster it well.
Labels realize, I suppose, that there are two types of people who buy classical music: casual listeners that don't care about (or can't notice) such things, and a coterie of discerning obsessives who are willing to get fleeced for a good recording.
But EMI has actually done everyone a favor. This CD is a gift to a person starting a classical music collection, or anyone who just wants a beautiful recording of these pieces. Mozart's two greatest violin concertos are here, along with the alternate movements that he wrote for the same concertos - the disc actually fills its running time of 80 minutes, and it sounds glorious even on headphones. I'm not sure if it was a great remastering job or just an unusually sharp recording in the first place, but everything sounds bright and alive.
My knowledge of performers isn't that good, and I had never heard of David Oistrakh when I picked this up, but after a few listens I was convinced that he had to be a legend - which, unsurprisngly, he was (and is, I suppose). His tone is incredibly pure and smooth, and his playing retains the improvisatory feel of some of Mozart's continuously unspooling melodies while remaining disciplined and clear.
The 4th and 5th violin concertos mark the point when Mozart stopped performing these compositions himself, and handed over the reins to a more skilled violinist - and my god, they seem to have gotten very complicated. The development of the melodies occasionally moves into harmonic areas where it sounds like Mozart must have been writing in 20th century: and parts of the Turkish concerto, I swear, sound like they were picked up by Sibelius to use in Tapiola. But a genius, I suppose, is always writing modern music.
This is great recording and a wonderful value - you'll listen to it forever, I assure you.
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The search stops here March 4 2007
By Sat Mad - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
I'm the type of listener that wants a quality reading of the essential pieces of music history so I can explore with the rest of my music budget for more obscure items. This way, when the satellite radio plays something outside of my preference, or a mood strikes, I'm covered.

With this purchase, my search for the two final Mozart violin concerti ceases. There may be a better violinist than Oistrakh, or one better suited for these pieces, or whatever disclaimer someone may want to put on it. I'm not buying it. I can now look for other pieces. Oistrakh is wonderful, the price is sentational (I used both the 4-for-3 and shipping bonuses as well), and the folks at EMI threw on three wonderful extras to extend the cd out to almost 80 minutes. Nice liner notes on the composer, violinist, and the music.

If you want to spend more for less, go ahead. But for someone who enjoys phenomenal violin music that has and will stand the test of time, this cd is a simple 5 star recommendation.
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What A Spectacular Recording!! Aug. 29 2009
By Dick Buckley - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
Wow! I'm overwhelmed! This CD features not only two of the greatest violin concertos ever written, but they are played by perhaps the greatest violinist of the past 100 years! Many moons ago, when I was knee high to a grasshopper, I acquired a vinyl LP of David Oistrach playing something - I've long since forgotten what, but his virtuosity impressed me deeply. When I saw this CD, I decided immediately to purchase it just to see if my memory was correct, and to see how he measures up to the current violin icons, like Perlman and Bell, for instance. I was far from disappointed! David Oistrach plays with more passion and feeling than any fiddler that I know, before or after him.

To make it all the more irreplaceable, the geniuses at EMI have chosen Mozart's 4th and 5th Concertos to grace this recording. It almost goes without saying that they have selected two of the finest pieces of music ever written. How they can offer these masterpieces at this ridiculous price baffles me. Thank God for small miracles.

Get this CD while you can! You'll be glad you did.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars There is no reason for not owning this March 17 2014
By Ralph Moore - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
As I write, these classic recordings from 1970 and 1971 are available on Marketplace for virtually nothing plus p&p. Take one the greatest violinists of the 20C directing indisputably the best orchestra of that era playing the two most popular of Mozart's violin concertos recorded in good, very slightly muzzy, analogue stereo sound in first class locations, throw in three favourite short bonus violin pieces and you have an irresistible, 77 minute package - especially when it is delivered to your door for close to free.

Oistrakh's deceptively relaxed manner is somewhat less brilliant than Grumiaux's, less adventurously indulgent than Mutter's and certainly more characterful than the recent disc I reviewed from Renaud Capuçon. Oistrakh's sweetness of tone and generosity of phrasing are abundantly apparent in these unhurried accounts and are of course best appreciated in the adagios; the extra tracks conclude with the alternative Adagio K.261 which, as the brief programme notes tell us, Mozart obligingly wrote for the first performer, Antonio Brunetti, court violinist to the Archbishop of Salzburg, who found the original (here restored) too "studied". Both are exquisite, especially when caressed by Oistrakh's Strad. Oistrakh had already had a serious heart attack and died only four years after these recordings; pair this disc with his famous account of the "Sinfonia concertante" with son Igor and Klemperer conducting.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Oistrach does it perfectly. Oct. 20 2010
By Ankarbranth Stefan - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
The only thing that could be better is the re mastering; more sharpness, clearer. With today's technology EMI should do it.
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