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Ruth Law Thrills a Nation [School & Library Binding]

Don Brown
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

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Book Description

November 1995
In 1916 a young woman named Ruth Law attempted to fly from Chicago to New York City in one day--something no one else had ever done. This is the story of that daring attempt. Beautifully detailed watercolors dramatize a dangerous journey made by the pilot President Woodrow Wilson called "great." Full-color illustrations.
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Product Details


Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Brown soars in his children's book debut with this true story of a little-known heroine. In 1916 Ruth Law set an American record by flying cross-country nonstop for 590 miles. She had hoped to pilot her small plane all the way from Chicago to New York City in a single day (she ended up spending the night in Binghamton), but hers was nevertheless a remarkable accomplishment--the extraordinary nature of which Brown recreates for his audience with a host of riveting details. To accustom herself to the cold weather (she flew an open-cockpit plane), Law spent the night before her flight in a tent on the roof of a Chicago hotel; she wore two woolen suits and two leather suits, but "covered her bulky outfit with a skirt. In 1916, a polite lady always wore a skirt." She flew a tiny, old plane because the manufacturer refused to sell her a newer, bigger model (he "did not believe a woman could fly a large plane"); to set her course, she relied on maps she had taped together and attached to her leg; forced to land in a field, she secured her plane overnight by tying it to a tree. As the author points out, the pilot who broke Law's record a year later was also a woman. Brown's full-page, pen-and-ink and watercolor pictures feature striking amalgams of variegated blue and purple hues; like the text they convey the drama of Law's feat. Ages 4-7.
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From School Library Journal

Kindergarten-Grade 3-This picture-book presentation of the exploits of a little-known figure in aviation history introduces a new heroine to young adventure fans. Brown's enthusiasm for and knowledge of his subject are clearly evident, and he includes several fascinating details in his brief account of Law's record-breaking feat of flying nonstop from Chicago to New York (590 miles). He makes oblique reference to the strictures on women's behavior at the time ("In 1916, a polite lady always wore a skirt"), but youngsters may need additional historical background to truly understand the enormity of Law's achievement. His scratchy cartoon-style illustrations with lovely watercolor washes are somewhat reminiscent of Tony Ross's work and convey both witty humor and poignant determination. While this early aviatrix may not be as well known as Amelia Earhart and others, her story will be enjoyed by primary-grade readers and provide them with an intriguing glimpse at a bygone era.
Lisa Dennis, The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews
1.0 out of 5 stars i didn't like the story Nov. 17 1998
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
because it was a boring story, and didn't have much detail
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5.0 out of 5 stars Fills in what the history books left out. Oct. 16 1997
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
This is a story wonderfully told (and illustrated) of woman who seems to have had mainline history pass her by. All three of our kids love it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars "The kids loved it!" April 15 1997
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
It's a great book, my kids loved it.

Waiting for the next one from Don Brown.
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5.0 out of 5 stars GREAT Aug. 30 1996
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
I love this book. In fact I loved researching, writing and illustrating it. I had so much fun that I am writing another book about another courageous woman-Alice Ramsey. In 1909, she became the first woman to drive across America
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars  7 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars GREAT Aug. 30 1996
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
I love this book. In fact I loved researching, writing and illustrating it. I had so much fun that I am writing another book about another courageous woman-Alice Ramsey. In 1909, she became the first woman to drive across America
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ruth Law's Brave Flight Sept. 26 2005
By Dai-keag-ity - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
In 1916, Ruth Law, a pioneer of aviation (who happened to be a woman) took off in a small, unsteady plane on a record-setting one-day solo flight between Chicago and New York. This highly-illustrated, easy to read book tells all about Law's voyage and why her trip is so important to history. Little details, like how Law covered her bulky flight suit with a skirt, for modesty's sake, seem especially interesting today. Law's courage and bold ambition make for an inspirational I-Know-I-Can-Do-It tale for children and adults, too.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars correction March 23 2007
By Susan M. Renfroe - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Ruth Law did not land in Binghamton on her flight from Chicago to New York City. She landed in Hornell,NY on November 16, 1916. She had run out of gas.

Her plane only carried 50 gallons. Army Lieutenant Henry "Hap" Arnold changed her sparkplugs and became her passenger on the trip to New York City. I am a native of Hornell and Ms. Callum's 4th grade class is trying to

get a "Ruth Law Day" in Hornell.
4.0 out of 5 stars Don Brown is great for finding obscure heroes to write biographies on Feb. 2 2010
By Ulyyf - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Ruth Law. Gosh, aviators make good heroes for kids! I mean, they're up in the sky, daring, soaring free as a bird in that carefree day before shoe bombers and seat belts. Wow.

Well, not SO carefree, Ruth had to basically build her airplane out of hope and prayers after she was not allowed to purchase a new one. Too many people had died already, hadn't they?

This book is about her attempt to fly from Chicago to NYC in one day. She didn't succeed, but the news kept tabs on her all day and she, you know, "thrilled a nation". Plus, she DID make a record for non-stop flying (one that was broken by another woman). Love the picture of the old New York skyline at the end.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fills in what the history books left out. Oct. 16 1997
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
This is a story wonderfully told (and illustrated) of woman who seems to have had mainline history pass her by. All three of our kids love it.
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