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Saints of the Shadow Bible Hardcover – Nov 5 2013


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Orion; British First edition (Nov. 5 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1409144747
  • ISBN-13: 978-1409144748
  • Product Dimensions: 16.3 x 3 x 24.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 581 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (47 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #47,321 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Outstanding...very ambitious and very confident with acute observation of the not-so-bonny side of Scotland―SUNDAY TELEGRAPH

Simply awesome―TIME OUT

Sardonic and assured...powerful and well-paced―INDEPENDENT

About the Author

Born in the Kingdom of Fife in 1960, Ian Rankin graduated from the University of Edinburgh in 1982, and then spent three years writing novels when he was supposed to be working towards a PhD in Scottish Literature. His first Rebus novel was published in 1987, and the Rebus books are now translated into thirty-six languages and are bestsellers worldwide.Ian Rankin has been elected a Hawthornden Fellow, and is also a past winner of the Chandler-Fulbright Award. He is the recipient of four Crime Writers' Association Dagger Awards including the prestigious Diamond Dagger in 2005. In 2004, Ian won America's celebrated Edgar Award for Resurrection Men. He has also been shortlisted for the Anthony Award in the USA, won Denmark's Palle Rosenkrantz Prize, the French Grand Prix du Roman Noir and the Deutscher Krimipreis. Ian Rankin is also the recipient of honorary degrees from the universities of Abertay, St Andrews, Edinburgh, Hull and the Open University.A contributor to BBC2's Newsnight Review, he also presented his own TV series, Ian Rankin's Evil Thoughts. Rankin is a number one bestseller in the UK and has received the OBE for services to literature, opting to receive the prize in his home city of Edinburgh, where he lives with his partner and two sons.

Visit his website www.ianrankin.net or follow him on Twitter @Beathhigh


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Most helpful customer reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Sandy TOP 50 REVIEWER on Nov. 12 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Every time I start a new book by Ian Rankin, I have the same problem...I want the world to go away 'til I'm done. I'm happy to say the streak has continued.
The world must seem a bit upside down for Rebus these days. He tried retirement but it didn't take. Ditto for working on the cold case squad. So he's back at CID but the best they would offer was DS status, with his former protege Siobhan Clarke as his new DI. That's ok, she's also one of his few friends. They're called out to single vehicle accident out by the airport. Car went off the road & the only occupant, a young woman, is recovering in hospital. It seems pretty straightforward, just a few details to check off. But neither Rebus or Clarke could have guessed where it would lead.
At the same time, Rebus gets wind the Solicitor General is reopening a 30 year old murder case due to changes in the double jeopardy law. It occurred when Rebus was a freshly minted DC at the Summerhall station. One of their snitches went on trial but it was thrown out due to police mishandling the evidence. Honest error or collusion? Detectives in that station at the time had a bit of a reputation for bending the rules if necessary. They even had an initiation ritual for new detectives joining their team, calling themselves the Saints of the Shadow Bible. One is dead, several have moved on but they'll all be yanked in by Professional Standards (IA) to explain themselves. And it's not like that case was an isolated incident.
Leading the interrogations is Malcolm Fox (The Complaints). Due to cutbacks & amalgamations, this will be his last case for IA & he's ready to go. Tired of being shunned by regular cops, he looks forward to being a proper detective again. He just has to survive working with Rebus.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By lilian on Nov. 30 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Rebus is one of the more engaging characters in crime fiction. Ian Rankin allows his character to age--not necessarily gracefully--but with his essential decency intact. He drinks too much, smokes too much. Rebus is a maverick and he follows a scent in his own way. The humor is clever. The characters are perceptively drawn--not always predictable. Some of the criminals are likable. Some of the "good guys" are not. There are moments of profound sadness but these are gracefully depicted. I never feel cheated when I read one of Rankin's books. Nothing is included for cheap or maudlin effect. Plots are plausible. This is one of the best Rebus books and they have all been excellent.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By David Henderson on Dec 7 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As a retired police officer I have read many of Ian Rankin's books but in this case I found Ian Rankin's John Rebus introspection very interesting when one looks back upon their career. Rebus is the old versus the new in the world of policing and investigation and he demonstrates the human feeling and the ability to separate the way the world was and the way the world is today. Rebus makes his investigation personal as he strives to ensure justice is not only done but seen to be done.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ian Gordon Malcomson HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Dec 13 2013
Format: Hardcover
Detective Inspector Rebus has returned from retirement and, once again, is busy hunting down criminals under the oddest of circumstances. As usual, Rankin presents his star character with a moral dilemma to resolve. While on the surface he appears to be an upright minion of the law intent on putting criminals behind bars, there is something sinister in his distant past that threatens to undo his otherwise sterling reputation. A new law has been passed that allows the authorities to retry old criminal cases, one of which may indirectly involve Rebus. How he handles this emerging crisis depends on how able he is to assert his presence in an investigation into the questionable tactics of an old fraternity of cops called the Saints of the Shadow Bible, a group that didn’t always play by the book and to which Rebus had close ties. This inquiry has been triggered by Scotland’s minister of justice who is in the thick of a national referendum on Scotland’s future. Admittedly, a hard task for a controversial figure like Rebus who has returned to a police force as a lowly detective sergeant with few friends. Complicating matters is the fact that he has been called upon to solve a mysterious accident that has its own, potentially, damaging implications. Essentially, he is answerable to two bosses who either want his hide or have his back. In this crazy world, Rebus is that old-fashioned cop who doesn’t always go by the rules. Here he has to think fast and play smart as he works his way through a number of Saints to find the one who has killed one of their own in order to frustrate the investigation. His only clue is an old Browning revolver found at the scene while his obstacles appear to be many, not least a conspiratorial wall of silence within the brotherhood. Read this book to find out this old cop can still stand for justice and defend his good name.
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Format: Hardcover
First Sentence: “Where are we going?”

John Rebus is out of retirement, demoted and now reporting to his protégée, Siobhan Clarke. A 30-year-old murder case has been reopened and Malcolm Fox, in his last case for Internal Affairs, is working it. A link is made in that that case brings into question the team with whom Rebus first worked, “Saints of the Shadow Bible.”

The opening scene reveals much of Rebus’ personality—he’s tenacious…”like a bloodhound with a scent…”; he never gives up on a case. He is described by a colleague as being “…a breed of cop that wasn’t supposed to exist anymore, are and endangered species.” For those who have followed the series, it is interesting to see how the character, and his life, has changed over time. Enough references to the past are made, however, that even new readers won’t feel lost. Set in the period just prior to vote on Scotland’s referendum for independence, it’s also interesting to see how that affects the case and the transitions it has made to policing in Scotland.

A person’s shopping list tells quite a bit about them. In Rebus’ case, it’s cigarettes and bacon. The combination of Rebus, Siobhan, and Malcolm Fox is both interesting. One does see how with maturity comes clarity and there is a nice balance of Rebus and Malcolm being opposite sides of a coin. Rebus’ actions, while in keeping with the character, are exasperating both to his colleagues, but also to the reader. It diminishes the story, rather than adding to it.

Rankin is a very spare writer. He tells you what you need to know, but doesn’t waste much of his time on filler. This well suits worth the characters and the story.
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