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Salem Falls Paperback – Aug 1 2002


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Washington Square Press; Reprint edition (Aug. 1 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743418719
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743418713
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 3 x 21 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 408 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (61 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #57,842 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Picoult's new novel (following the acclaimed Plain Truth) is a story about rape and reputation, loosely based on The Crucible. Jack St. Bride comes to Salem Falls, N.H., after his release from prison. The former teacher and soccer coach wants to start a new life following a wrongful conviction for statutory rape. Unfortunately, Salem Falls turns out to be the wrong place to do it. He has no trouble landing a job at the local diner and winning the trust of the diner's eccentric owner, Addie, but the rest of the town is suspicious. Things get dangerous when manipulative 17-year-old Gillian Duncan, whose father owns half the town, gets interested in Jack and tries to seduce him with Wiccan love spells. Then Gillian is assaulted in the woods, and Jack is accused of the crime. As the courtroom battle unfolds, many secrets are revealed, and Picoult's characters are forced to confront the difference between who people are and who they say they are. The difference is considerable: despite the townspeople's aura of virtue, by the end of the book we're hard pressed to find any women who have never been raped or threatened, or any men who are really innocent of violence. While Picoult seems ambivalent about the power of Wiccan spells, she has no doubts about the power of sex and violence to change lives. Some of her characters, though, can be almost disturbingly forgiving. Genuinely suspenseful and at times remarkably original, this romance-mystery-morality play will gain Picoult new readers although her treatment of the aftermath of rape may also make her a few enemies. Agent, Laura Gross. 10-city author tour. (Apr. 10) Forecast: Picoult tastefully tackled touchy subject matter in Plain Truth, but she tips toward sensationalism here. That may gain her readers in the short run, but could undermine her reputation over time.
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

When Jack St. Bride arrives in the small town of Salem Falls, all he wants is to escape his past. He's spent the last eight months in jail, after being falsely accused of having an affair with an underage student at the school where he taught. In Salem Falls, he gets a job as a dishwasher at a local diner and tentatively begins a romance with the diner's owner, Addie, who is still mourning the death of her young daughter, born after Addie was raped in high school by three drunk boys. As she and Jack fall in love, they both see hope for the future. But their newfound love is threatened when the residents of Salem Falls learn of Jack's conviction and begin harassing him. When, predictably, a teenage girl accuses Jack of raping her, he finds himself back in jail, fighting a serious charge and the town's prejudice. Addie wrestles with her doubts and memories of her own rape, but she believes in Jack and goes on a quest of her own to find out the truth about Jack's initial conviction, even as the Salem Falls trial opens. Unfortunately, the novel spirals down into cliche, toward an all-too-predictable ending. There are some interesting elements here (such as Addie's inability to accept the death of her daughter), but the novel doesn't rise above its formulaic plot. Still, Picoult's previous novels, including Keeping Faith (1999) and The Pact (1998), have garnered a large audience, especially in book-discussion groups. Expect her latest to generate some demand, but buy cautiously. Kristine Huntley
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ratmammy on June 16 2004
Format: Hardcover
SALEM FALLS by Jodi Picoult
Jodi Picoult does it again with SALEM FALLS, a story about a man who is falsely accused of rape. Jack St. Bride was a teacher and soccer coach at a small town high school, when he is accused of rape and is sentenced to 8 months in prison. When he is released, he finds his way to another small town, Salem Falls, to start a new life, hoping that anonymity will give him the peace he is looking for.
The wheels of fate start turning when he has to report in to the local police department and let them know he is a sex-offender. In this small town, gossip spreads fast, and soon the entire town learns who Jack really is. Only two people feel that he is innocent of the crime he was accused of back home: Addie Peabody, who owns the "Do-or-Diner" and her father, Roy Peabody. Both of them are dealing with losses that have greatly affected their current life, and in some way they can relate to Jack as he struggles to escape from his past.
At the heart of this story is the theme of "the witch hunt", as the towns people watch Jack closely with condemning eyes as they wait for him to make his first mistake. He is then accused of yet another rape, this time accused by the only daughter of the richest man in Salem Falls. Jodi Picoult keeps the reader guessing, as even the reader isn't sure whether Jack is guilty or not. As with KEEPING FAITH and THE PACT, this book ends in the courtroom, and it is anyone's guess what the final verdict will be.
This is yet another Jodi Picoult book that I enjoyed a lot. Although it took me a while to get into the story, as I had a hard time relating to the teens who practiced witchcraft, it all came together in the end. Highly recommended, I am giving this book five stars.
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By T. R. Volk on April 30 2004
Format: Hardcover
While sipping too-strong coffee in the bookstore cafe, I stumbled across the name Jodi Picoult in a Writer's Digest article on writing page-turners. I was in the mood for reading someone new, so I headed for the P's in the fiction section.
Ugh! What a disappointment when I began reading the cover blurbs! Then I picked up Salem Falls. Witches! That was all I needed, so I headed for the checkout. Yes, I also bought the Writer's Digest.
I must be honest and say that I needed a year to finish this book. However not because I found it unreadable, but because Ms. Picoult strikes a bit too close to home in her descriptions of how modern men must interact with teenage females. One of my male friends was falsely accused by his ex-wife of raping his step-daughter, and the next six months of his life were absolute hell. Reading the first half of this book was very discomforting.
For her accurate portrayal of Jack's paranoia after his first conviction, I give Ms. Picoult five stars. However, Salem Falls is far from being a perfect book and the reader cannot analyze the investigative and courtroom procedures too deeply. Conversely, Ms. Picoult makes suspending belief easy, offering the reader a surprise or a new angle every ten paragraphs or so.
Looking through descriptions of her other books, I do not find anything that particularly interests me, but for readers of this genre, you are in good hands.
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By Melissa on Dec 9 2003
Format: Paperback
One again Jodi Picoult manages to weave a plot of vulnerability, superstition, and the never-ceasing power of love.
Upon arriving in the small town of Salem Falls, Jack St. Bride is alone, untrusting, and longing for a new life to fill the emptiness that has become him while wasting away in prison. He stumbles into the Do-or-Diner where the young owner Addie, offers him a job on the spot. When Addie offers him this job, she has subconsciously offered up her trust, and from there, the plot unravels.
Addie has lived in Salem Falls her entire life, and has indeed suffered the drawbacks of small town living. As a rape victim and single mother, she too makes her way through life longing to place her trust and hope in someone.
When a young woman in Salem Falls accuses Jack of brutally raping her, the small town is enraged. Jack St. Bride has ruined exactly what their small town stands for--safety--and the citizens of the quiet, close-knit community will go to extremes in order to ensure that their town's reputation is safe.
Readers are in for a truly shocking and genius end that only Picoult could deliver. Perhaps after reading Salem Falls, you too, will question the age old cliche of small-town security....
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By A Customer on Oct. 18 2003
Format: Paperback
Very early on I knew what would be revealed on the last page. Yes, I took genetics in college. And despite some overly "feel good moments" I think a lot of the events were realistic. Teen girls with crushes on an older man/teacher/coach? It happens. Teen girls drawn to Wicca? Sure. A man accused of something terrible he hasn't done? That's been known to happen too.
But I think the most interesting questions rise out of the sort of incidental information Picoult gives her readers. Why is it important for us to see the scenes we do of Annalise McBride, Jack's mother? What about a person's past? Is it fair or right that some crimes go unpunished?
For the most part, I'd say this is a well written book. I don't fault Picoult for failing to "surprise" me. While I already knew where she was going, I certainly enjoyed the trip. But I think the best parts of the book (and the reasons I will suggest my friends read it) are the issues and questions that are raised--subtle and not. And while I would not classify it an "issue" book, I think the characters are so well developed their problems become our own.
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