The Sandman: Dream Hunters (P. Craig Russell) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 17.32
  • List Price: CDN$ 23.99
  • You Save: CDN$ 6.67 (28%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Sandman: Dream Hunters Paperback – Oct 5 2010


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 17.32
CDN$ 9.49 CDN$ 12.54

Join Amazon Student in Canada



Frequently Bought Together

Sandman: Dream Hunters + Sandman, The: Endless Nights + Sandman Vol. 10: The Wake (New Edition)
Price For All Three: CDN$ 51.96

Some of these items ship sooner than the others. Show details

  • In Stock.
    Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
    FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ CDN$ 25. Details

  • Sandman, The: Endless Nights CDN$ 17.32

    Usually ships within 2 to 3 weeks.
    Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
    FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ CDN$ 25. Details

  • Sandman Vol. 10: The Wake (New Edition) CDN$ 17.32

    In Stock.
    Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
    FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ CDN$ 25. Details


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Vertigo; Reprint edition (Oct. 5 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401224288
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401224288
  • Product Dimensions: 25.6 x 17 x 0.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 240 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #20,473 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on May 16 2010
Format: Paperback
Neil Gaiman's Sandman series ranks among the best graphic novels ever written -- and its spinoff materials aren't bad either.

Among those spinoff materials is "The Dream Hunters," a gorgeously illustrated novella about the love between a beautiful kitsune and a Buddhist monk, and the part that Gaiman's legendary Dream plays in their story. Now it's been reworked like fine modeler's clay into an even more exquisite graphic novel, with lushly shaded artwork based on traditional Japanese art. It's a stunning piece of work.

A young monk takes care of a tiny temple by himself, until the day a fox and a badger pass by. They make a wager about who can drive him out of his temple, and who will get it as a new home once he's gone. Using their transformation powers, both the fox and badger try to trick the young monk into fleeing his temple... but they fail miserably. And after the monk drives away the badger, the fox asks to remain in the temple with the monk -- and the two of them fall in love.

But then the fox overhears the Baku -- dream eaters -- talking of their onmyoji master's scheme to destroy the monk through his dreams. Living in perpetual fear, the onmyoji was told (by a freaky multibreasted woman) to kill the young monk without pain or fear -- and this will give him the monk's peace of mind. The fox doesn't intend to let the monk be killed, and when she lapses into a coma, he ventures into the Palace of Dreams to save her life. But asking for help from the King of Dreams has a price...

The "Sandman: Dream Hunters" graphic novel is a very different experience from the original novella -- the novella was a prose story enhanced by Yoshitaka Amano's darker illustrations, while the graphic novel is all about the exquisite images and colorful art.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 17 reviews
17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
The monk and the fox Nov. 3 2009
By E. A Solinas - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Neil Gaiman's Sandman series ranks among the best graphic novels ever written -- and its spinoff materials aren't bad either.

Among those spinoff materials is "The Dream Hunters," a gorgeously illustrated novella about the love between a beautiful kitsune and a Buddhist monk, and the part that Gaiman's legendary Dream plays in their story. Now it's been reworked like fine modeler's clay into an even more exquisite graphic novel, with lushly shaded artwork based on traditional Japanese art. It's a stunning piece of work.

A young monk takes care of a tiny temple by himself, until the day a fox and a badger pass by. They make a wager about who can drive him out of his temple, and who will get it as a new home once he's gone. Using their transformation powers, both the fox and badger try to trick the young monk into fleeing his temple... but they fail miserably. And after the monk drives away the badger, the fox asks to remain in the temple with the monk -- and the two of them fall in love.

But then the fox overhears the Baku -- dream eaters -- talking of their onmyoji master's scheme to destroy the monk through his dreams. Living in perpetual fear, the onmyoji was told (by a freaky multibreasted woman) to kill the young monk without pain or fear -- and this will give him the monk's peace of mind. The fox doesn't intend to let the monk be killed, and when she lapses into a coma, he ventures into the Palace of Dreams to save her life. But asking for help from the King of Dreams has a price...

The "Sandman: Dream Hunters" graphic novel is a very different experience from the original novella -- the novella was a prose story enhanced by Yoshitaka Amano's darker illustrations, while the graphic novel is all about the exquisite images and colorful art. But the story is just as powerful as in its other form, with its haunting forays into a world of dreams that lingers beyond life and death.

The story is actually a rather simple one: monk meets fox and they fall in love, only to become ensnared in a selfish man's plot, and the young monk is forced to go on a journey. It's like a Japanese-flavored version of the Orpheus legend, except that the monk doesn't go into the land of the dead -- his quest takes him into the world of Dream (yes, the dude from the "Sandman" series). And the story takes a darker turn in the last quarter when the omnyoji becomes ensnared in an elaborate scheme to give him what he deserves.

In fact, the story is all the more tragic because Gaiman's quiet, simple prose makes you like the monk and fox immensely -- she's a basic trickster who learns to passionately love someone else, and he's a saintly young man whose caring for animals leads to a romantic love.

And the artwork is simply exquisite -- P. Craig Russell takes his cues from traditional Japanese artwork (lots of maple leaves and flying swallows), with plenty of soft muted colors and elaborate backgrounds. He swirls his realistic designs together with wastelands of bone, dragons of fire, houses sitting in the clouds, and a lord of Dreams who walks in a vast celestial robe of sleeping faces and green fire. Even without the story, this would be a visual feast.

Neil Gaiman's beautiful tale of love, dreams and loss is no less exquisite for being reimagined -- "Sandman: Dream Hunters" is like a beautiful painting of a little prose gem. A must-see.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Decent work, but not nearly as good as the original. May 29 2010
By A. Landry - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Incase you haven't noticed, there exist two versions of Gaiman's Dream Hunters. One is illustrated by Yoshitaka Amano (paperback, originally released in 1999), and the other (the product you're currently viewing) by P. Craig Russell. Russell's version is rendered in comic book fashion, while Amano's plays out like a classic fairy tale book (think picture book).

I was not very impressed with Russell's artwork for this book, it doesn't have the detail and style that is featured in the original sandman series or the original version of Dream Hunters. Those works feature a detailed, unique, and ultra stylized type of artwork. The newer version of Dream Hunters feels somewhat flat and bland, it almost has a B grade feel to it. If you are not a hardcore fan of Gaiman's Sandman series, and/or are short on money, I would highly recommend the original over this purchase. The story for Dream Hunters was based on an old Japanese fairy tale, and the original version of this book features one of Japan's finest artists, Yoshitaka Amano. If you want the full experience, buy the original first.

And with a flick of her tail, she was gone.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Be wary that there are two versions to The Dream Hunters!! Oct. 5 2011
By Sean Mackey - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Here is a story that delves into perhaps one of my favorite eras of myths and legends, an ancient Japan. It is the tale of a humble monk and a fox spirit who develop an impossible love that is further complicated by a plot on the monk's life. Truly it's a heart-felt story which I shall not further delve into lest I compromise important details!

But.... Through no one's fault but my own I failed to notice that this version of The Dream Hunters is fully illustrated by P. Craig Russell and is much more in the vein of what you'd expect of Gaiman's Sandman works. But before buying this book, I had, through perhaps *cough* illegitimate means *cough*, read the version written in prose with beautifully abstract illustrations by Yoshitaka Amano on every other page to accent the story. I had in reading this significant departure from what may be considered an average graphic novel, come to enjoy the storybook feel to the Yoshitaka version which left much to the imagination and as such for me was far more touching. Contrasting this is Craig Russell's illustrations which act as the narrative device and as such must become far less abstract in their representations of characters and scenery alike given things a very grounded feel which I don't feel adequately does the overarching themes of this story justice. Needless to say regardless of the version you pick up you're in store for a fantastical and very emotional tale but I must say that I much preferred Yoshitaka's version to Russell's (though to him I mean no offense, he did a superb job illustrating my favorite Sandman issue 'Ramadan').
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
A different artist for a solid story March 26 2010
By Michael Demeritt - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Originally published with the artwork of a Japanese artist and the story written in standard prose, this redrawing of The Dream Hunters is a traditional comic book format. The new art and format add little, perhaps even nothing, to the tale, nor serve to detract from it either. I prefer the original, but would not hesitate to recommend this version for any fan of the Dream king.
Domo arigato, Gaiman-san. July 2 2014
By James B. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
While a lot of the new Sandman material coming out of Vertigo has been pointless, and even boring, the Dreamhunters is an excellent addition to the story and history of Morpheus.

For fans of previous Sandman works, this can be seen as an extended version of the classic 'Ramadan'. For those of you not familiar, this means that the story is made up of a lot of lyrical prose, lyrical dialogue, and absolutely stunning artwork. P.Craig Russell did fabulous work with the original novel.

Product Images from Customers

Search


Feedback