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Sandworms of Dune Mass Market Paperback – Jul 1 2008


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 560 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Science Fiction; 1 edition (July 1 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0765351498
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765351494
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 3.1 x 16.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 272 g
  • Average Customer Review: 2.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #77,218 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Longtime collaborators Herbert and Anderson set themselves a steep challenge—and, in the end, fail to meet it—in this much anticipated wrapup of the original Dune cycle (after 2006's Hunters of Dune). A large cast scattered across the cosmos must be brought together so that the final, all-powerful Kwisatz Haderach may be revealed in the ultimate face-off between humankind and the machine empire ruled by the implacable Omnius. Though pacing is brisk and the infrequent action scenes crackle with tension, only two minor characters—gholas, who are young clones with restored memories, of Suk doctor Wellington Yueh and God-Emperor Leto II—acquire real depth. Everyone else is too busy reacting to mostly irrelevant subplots like sabotage aboard the no-ship Ithaca, a plague devastating the planet of Chapterhouse and the genetic engineering of marine-dwelling sandworms. The lengthy climax relies on at least four consecutive deus ex machina bailouts, eventually devolving into sheer fairy tale optimism. Series fans will argue the novel's merits for years; others will be underwhelmed. (Aug.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Booklist

By the time of this second volume of the third Dune prequel trilogy, battles and plagues have nearly destroyed humans and their planets. Sheanna revives the ghola cloning project to pit genius against numbers. Almost all the saga principals have been re-created—Paul, Jessica, Letos I and II, Chani, Stilgar, even Wellington Yueh and Baron Harkonnen—and are hiding on the no-ship. The eleventh ghola of Duncan Idaho keeps an eye on things. Naturally, such a crew generates intrigue, dissension, and many actions unintentionally at cross-purposes. Some of the re-creations learn from the past, some don't. Meanwhile, Omnius and Erasmus, leaders of the thinking machines, search for the no-ship; failing to find it, they finish the destruction of any planet capable of supporting human life. When the clones and the thinking machines finally confront each other, the conflict proves pretty gripping. Its plot derived from Frank Herbert's notes, Sandworms should fascinate Dune fans. The series' long run by now begs the question of whether, since Sandworms ties up so many loose ends, more of what has been learned about the construction and destruction of ecologies, and about thinking machines, in the 42 years since Dune was first published couldn't figure in the promised ninth prequel volume, Paul of Dune. Murray, Frieda --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

2.6 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By M. Ferguson on Sept. 9 2007
Format: Hardcover
Unfortunately it's very clear that Frank Herbert's son doesn't have half the skill his father did. The final book in the Dune series leaves me wishing I had not read it. The ending of this book contradicts of lot of what was written in the first 6 books. The conclusion felt extremely rushed and very immature. The last 200 pages of the book basically throw out everything written in the first part of the book and the reader is left feeling like there was little point to the first half of the book. The character development is very weak and many of the characters behave completely opposite to how they were developed over the last several books in the series. In the end, the entire conclusion became completely unbelievable.

I give this book 2 stars for simply providing an idea of what Frank Herbert's intentions were to finish the series. I wish I had been allowed to read his raw notes rather than having to go through this book, I probably would have found it more enjoyable.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By David M. Nataf on Aug. 19 2007
Format: Hardcover
I was really dissapointed with this book. The Hunters of Dune wasn't too bad, I thought. There was some good action, good intrigue and development. And sandworms of dune started decently well. What was wrong with it is how they tied up the loose ends and pieces at the end. I won't spoil, but I'll say that the rhythm was ridiculous. Everything is slow through the first 800 pages of Dune 7 and 8, and then in the last 200 pages everything clears up, a lot of it in a very nonsensical manner. I realize these are not the original author, but it was still dissapointing. For example, I certainly thought they did a better job in the Battle of Corrin.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Barry E. Boothman on Aug. 28 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback
There's no resemblance between Hunters and Sandworms of Dune (written by Brian Herbert and Kevin Anderson) and Chapterhouse Dune, the final book by Frank Herbert. The plot sequences never match up. Chapterhouse was about the final unfolding of the Golden Path (and Herbert fans know that it was about preventing the human race from destroying itself). Instead, we have the artificial plotline salvaged from earlier novels by Brian and Kevin. Supposedly the machines are back and out to annihilate humanity. Unfortunately, the machines are dumb, the humans are dumber (whereas in Chapterhouse they're so, so smart). No one in this latest novel can figure anything out. Wooden dialogue, non-sequiters, short chapters -- the usual pitfals of Brian and Kevin's writing. Save your money, leave this one on the remainder pile.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Agno on Sept. 8 2009
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I love the Dune series, and I occasionally try to pick up this book (or one of the others), and find that the writing and the tone of the story are so completely different from (and, in my opinion, so much worse than) the originals, that I just can't bring myself to finish more than a chapter or two. It's rare that I find a book for which I cannot summon the will to finish reading, but every book I've tried in this series fits that description.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By I. Mitchell on Sept. 16 2007
Format: Hardcover
I've approached the Dune prequel/sequel novels with a relatively open mind, recognizing that they weren't written by Frank Herbert and couldn't possibly be expected stand up to the originals. On their own merits, I've found them enjoyable, if a bit lightweight, despite some fairly clumsy writing in spots.

Having said that, I found Sandworms of Dune in particular a bit frustrating, mostly because I could see tiny hints about what the conclusion of the Dune series could have been like if Frank Herbert had survived long enough to write it himself. The story really called for more of the 'philosophical' style of Frank Herbert, rather than the action/space-opera style of Brian Herbert & Kevin Anderson. I'd actually be really interested in reading Frank Herbert's original outline for the story to find out how much of the overall plot was him and how much his son and Anderson made up.
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