Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Saturday Night Fever/Staying Alive
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
      

Saturday Night Fever/Staying Alive


Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.


Product Details

  • Format: NTSC
  • Studio: Paramount
  • Release Date: Sept. 18 2007
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000SSJTK6
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #71,119 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Product Description

Saturday Night Fever/Staying Alive

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: DVD
I finally have gotten around, now in late 2014 at 71 years of age, to watching these two motion pictures! I should not have taken so seriously the miles-laid-thick snobbery about these two films, especially regarding "Saturday Night Fever" (S.N.F.), and all the additional snubbing of disco music and of disco dancing. On their own terms, these two films are terrifically entertaining. The dancing remains wonderful; seen now, the disco dancing in S.N.F. often looks remarkably elegant, even (oddly enough) rather genteel, and certainly necessitates much Terpsichorean ballroom-like skill. Atop that, "Saturday Night Fever" has a storyline full of grit and warm human interest, quite apart from the superb scenes on the dance-floor. Of course, most Amazon users will know already that "Staying Alive" is the sequel to S.N.F.

In the earlier film, Tony Manero, John Travolta's character, is 19 years old, the teen disco king of his neighbourhood in Brooklyn, N.Y. Travolta, already a star on T.V., especially, for the youth market, does S.N.F.'s disco-style dancing exceedingly well and is quite accomplished as an actor. He interacts with Tony Manero's male pals and with the women in S.N.F. like a truly seasoned actor.

In "Staying Alive", Tony Manero has become an aspiring professional dancer, now aged 25, for Broadway and modern dance. The storyline for "Staying Alive" does not have the convincing plot and characterisation that capture the viewer's heart to anywhere near the extent that S.N.F. did so, and, in fact, "Staying Alive" is rather stiff and lacking in credibility in many ways, but the dancing in Broadway and modern dance idioms in that film is exceptionally good.

Best of all in "Staying Alive" is the modern dance ballet sequence, "Satan's Alley".
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: DVD
I finally have gotten around, now in late 2014 at 71 years of age, to watching these two motion pictures! I should not have taken so seriously the miles-laid-thick snobbery about these two films, especially regarding "Saturday Night Fever" (S.N.F.), and all the additional snubbing of disco music and of disco dancing. On their own terms, these two films are terrifically entertaining. The dancing remains wonderful; seen now, the disco dancing in S.N.F. often looks remarkably elegant, even (oddly enough) rather genteel, and certainly necessitates much Terpsichorean ballroom-like skill. Atop that, "Saturday Night Fever" has a storyline full of grit and warm human interest, quite apart from the superb scenes on the dance-floor. Of course, most Amazon users will know already that "Staying Alive" is the sequel to S.N.F.

In the earlier film, Tony Manero, John Travolta's character, is 19 years old, the teen disco king of his neighbourhood in Brooklyn, N.Y. Travolta, already a star on T.V., especially, for the youth market, does S.N.F.'s disco-style dancing exceedingly well and is quite accomplished as an actor. He interacts with Tony Manero's male pals and with the women in S.N.F. like a truly seasoned actor.

In "Staying Alive", Tony Manero has become an aspiring professional dancer, now aged 25, for Broadway and modern dance. The storyline for "Staying Alive" does not have the convincing plot and characterisation that capture the viewer's heart to anywhere near the extent that S.N.F. did so, and, in fact, "Staying Alive" is rather stiff and lacking in credibility in many ways, but the dancing in Broadway and modern dance idioms in that film is exceptionally good.

Best of all in "Staying Alive" is the modern dance ballet sequence, "Satan's Alley".
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By Dawn Franklin on Dec 9 2014
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Excellent
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 36 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
disco dvd Oct. 18 2008
By Amy E. Muscarella - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
The Saturday Night Fever and Staying Alive DVD's were really enjoyable to watch. I threw a 70's theme party for my husbands 50th birthday and I played the DVD's while I played other Disco music during the party. We watched Staying Alive later that night and got a kick out of the styles.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Satisfying Acting, Travolta's Great Looks and His Dancing Skill, Make Both of These Films Worthwhile and Fun to View! Dec 9 2014
By Gerald Parker - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
I finally have gotten around, now in late 2014 at 71 years of age, to watching these two motion pictures! I should not have taken so seriously the miles-laid-thick snobbery about these two films, especially regarding "Saturday Night Fever" (S.N.F.), and all the additional snubbing of disco music and of disco dancing. On their own terms, these two films are terrifically entertaining. The dancing remains wonderful; seen now, the disco dancing in S.N.F. often looks remarkably elegant, even (oddly enough) rather genteel, and certainly necessitates much Terpsichorean ballroom-like skill. Atop that, "Saturday Night Fever" has a storyline full of grit and of warm human interest, quite apart from the superb scenes on the dance-floor. Of course, most Amazon users will know already that "Staying Alive" is the sequel to S.N.F.

In the earlier film, Tony Manero, John Travolta's character, is 19 years old, the teen disco king of his neighbourhood in Brooklyn, N.Y. Travolta, already a star on T.V., especially, for the youth market, does S.N.F.'s disco-style dancing exceedingly well and is quite accomplished as an actor. He interacts with Tony Manero's male pals and with the women in S.N.F. like a truly seasoned actor.

In "Staying Alive", Tony Manero has become an aspiring professional dancer, now aged 25, for Broadway and modern dance. The storyline for "Staying Alive" does not have the convincing plot and characterisation that capture the viewer's heart to anywhere near the extent that S.N.F. did so, and, in fact, "Staying Alive" is rather stiff and lacking in credibility in many ways, but the dancing in Broadway and modern dance idioms in that film is exceptionally good.

Best of all in "Staying Alive" is the modern dance ballet sequence, "Satan's Alley". It is a quite vivid, an utterly decadent, and a S&M-infused bit of deviltry, sulfurously erotic. Some have written that "Satan's Alley" is "way over the top", but, actually, it is brilliantly choreographed and shows Travolta's brilliant dancing skills for all that they are worth (which is to say, a lot!); the only (relatively slight) flaw is the resort excessively often to too much slow-motion camera work. "Satan's Alley", in fact, is what makes "Staying Alive" really worth continued viewing. Of course, John Travolta is, if anything, even more achingly vivid, physically, his bare flesh (getting down to loincloth-only as his costume sheds) which is on close-to-complete display of his superlative body in much of "Satan's Alley". At this point in his life and movie career, Travolta was alike "studly" of body and even more incineratingly macho of good looks (including his fine face's still youthful beauty) than he had been so already in S.N.F.

Don't wait so long, folks, as I did to view these two movies, so conveniently coupled on this double-DVD product, the two films within a single container (Paramount Home Entertainment 13096 being the North American edition viewed, in widescreen display). The bonus features, of a strongly retrospective nature, on the disc for S.N.F. are excellent and varied; as for "Staying Alive", the disc devoted to that move has no such extra features.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
I have always loved watching Saturday Night Fever Oct. 9 2014
By APG - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I have always loved watching Saturday Night Fever, especially because it takes place in my hometown. The dancing and music in this movie are excellent. I didn't see Staying Alive when it came out in the movies, and I had only seen part of the movie on tv once. I thought it would be a bore, but it wasn;t. I actually ended up liking it better than Saturday Night Fever. It was much better story.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Now he has a new love for the songs Oct. 28 2014
By shay howard - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
My husband of 46 has never seen this movie. Being a Bee Gees fan I knew he had to see it. Now he has a new love for the songs. Thank you Amazon.
7 of 11 people found the following review helpful
one good and one bad Dec 12 2007
By Bennet Pomerantz - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Saturday Night Fever was filled with dancing and energy. It is a video time capsule to the Diaco scene. Filled with the music of the Bee Gees, this film made you dance and still does.

John Travolta made his starring debut as Tony, far away from his Barbarino character from Welcome Back Kotter (season one of Kotter is on DVD). Tony lived for his club dancing, until he made a girl and fell in love. In Travolta's first starring vehicle, you can see the star power coming through

In the sequal to Fever, Staying Alive, Tony is now a dancer auditioning like a gypsy for Broadway dancing roles. The film starts with song "Far from Over" over the credits, foreshadowing the overlong and overdrawn sequel.

Travolta, whose dance was a marvel in Fever, seem to prance around like a deer lost in the headlights. The script written by Sylvester Stallone (who also directed) tries to do a dancing Rocky, but this vehicle tanks on the ropes. The dancing seem uninspiring and over rehearsed.Tony does take the lead on Broadway, but loses the films audience. We tend not to care in the long run

The highlight of Alive is Steve Inwood, in the role of Broadway director. He has a flair with his intensive to the play. His role is in a few scenes of the movie, but he steals everything when he is on the film.

I give this double feature three stars for fever and None for Alive

Bennet Pomerantz AUDIOWORLD

Look for similar items by category


Feedback