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Saucerful of Secrets Import


Price: CDN$ 33.95
Only 1 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Vanderbilt CA.
3 new from CDN$ 33.94 6 used from CDN$ 7.72

Frequently Bought Together

Saucerful of Secrets + The Piper at the Gates of Dawn + Obscured By Clouds
Price For All Three: CDN$ 78.66

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Oct. 25 1990)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: EMI Music Canada
  • ASIN: B000002U9Y
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (100 customer reviews)

1. Let There Be More Light
2. Remember A Day
3. Set The Controls For The Heart Of The Sun
4. Corporal Clegg
5. A Saucerful Of Secrets
6. See-Saw
7. Jugband Blues


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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: LP Record Verified Purchase
I'm after buying a few records from espirt in the UK and I have nothing but awesome things to say about them. Always fast, and always exactly as advertised.
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By TDN on March 18 2012
Format: Audio CD
One of the great trendsetters of all the musical groups going beyond the commercial products that had defined Pop music for so long. Pink Floyd was one of the first groups to create a complete sound without the use of orchestras. Really there was no synthesizers to say at this point yet with guitars, organ, percussions and vocals they created a rich sound. Here they are really breaking new ground that would eventually lead to their future success.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By mss805 on Nov. 22 2006
Format: Audio CD
Regardless of Syd's contributions this album paves the way for most Pink Floyd's fans. When I first spun this album of my own record player in 74, I was floored. 15 and trippin in the early 70s, nothing could have etched itself more into my life than this album. There's this poetic, if not infantile, fairy tale atmosphere to most of the songs that strikes a universal chord of identification.

call me a post hippie freak...I could care less. This album/CD...Rules!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Terrence J Reardon on June 26 2004
Format: Audio CD
In 1968, English rockers Pink Floyd were facing major problems. The band's first US tour was cancelled after guitarist/vocalist/songwriter Syd Barrett's dependency on hallucinogenic drugs were causing his behavior to become more erratic(on the band's first US TV appearance on American Bandstand, the group got through it unscathed but on The Pat Boone Show, Syd refused to mime to See Emily Play or speak to Pat), the band's third single Apples and Oranges failed and a proposed fourth single Vegetable Man was not ever released. Early in January 1968, drummer Nick Mason, keyboardist Rick Wright and bassist/vocalist Roger Waters called Syd's childhood friend David Gilmour and invited him to join making PF a five piece for five shows. Then, before what would have been the sixth gig as a five piece, Roger said let's not pick up Syd. After he left, the band recorded a fourth single It Would Be So Nice, which flopped and were also recording their second album A Saucerful of Secrets, released in July of 1968. I first heard this album on the 1973 double disc A Nice Pair, which was the reissue of Floyd's first two albums, when I was 11 in May of 1987. The album starts off with Let There Be More Light, which has Rick singing and Roger whispering in unison on one part then David Gilmour singing the next part. The track ends with a soaring Gilmour solo(the first proper guitar solo on a Floyd track by the way). Next is Remember a Day, which was a holdover from Piper at the Gates and was written and sung by Rick with great slide guitar by Syd. Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun follows and was written and sung by Roger and was Roger's first truly great song he wrote for the band and he performed it on his tours in 2000 and 2002.Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Terrence J Reardon on June 25 2004
Format: Audio CD
In 1968, English rockers Pink Floyd were facing major problems. The band's first US tour was cancelled after guitarist/vocalist/songwriter Syd Barrett's dependency on hallucinogenic drugs were causing his behavior to become more and more erratic(on the band's first US TV appearance on American Bandstand, the group got that appearance unscathed but things got worse on The Pat Boone Show, Syd refused to mime to See Emily Play(Roger eventually mimed to it) or speak to Pat), the band's third single Apples and Oranges failed in the UK(not released in the US until the 1992 Shine On box set) and a proposed fourth single Vegetable Man was not ever released. Early in January 1968, drummer Nick Mason, keyboardist Rick Wright and bassist/vocalist Roger Waters called Syd's childhood friend guitarist and vocalist David Gilmour and invited him to join making PF briefly a five piece. Syd seemed relieved when Dave was there to relieve some pressure. Then, before what would have been the sixth gig as a five piece, Roger said let's not pick up Syd. After he left, the band recorded a fourth single It Would Be So Nice, which flopped and were also recording their second album A Saucerful of Secrets, released in July of 1968. I first heard this album when I got the 1973 double disc reissue of the band's first two album A Nice Pair on cassette when I was 11 in May of 1987. The album starts off with Let There Be More Light, which has Rick singing and Roger whispering in unison on one part then David Gilmour singing the next part. The track ends with a soaring Gilmour solo(the first proper guitar solo on a Floyd track by the way as Syd wasn't a skilled guitarist unlike Dave who literally taught Syd how to play ironically).Read more ›
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Format: Audio CD
To me, I always felt that A Saucerful of Secrets was more or less a gap between the Barrett-era Floyd and the more experimental Floyd albums that were to follow. As everyone knows, Syd Barrett was too far gone and was booted out of the band by the time of this album, although he did leave behind "Jugband Blues". His replacement was of course David Gilmour, and so the best-known lineup (that eventually gave us multi-million sellers like The Dark Side of the Moon and The Wall) of Waters/Wrights/Gilmour/Mason was established here. The band more or less decided to continue exploring the more spacy, experimental side of psychedelia in the abscence of Barrett. For example, Waters giving us "Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun". Here Wright gives us some truly wonderful spacy keyboards while Mason gives us some nice use of percussion (sounds like kettle drums here). "Corporal Clegg" could easily sound like a Barrett song, although I recognize David Gilmour's vocals (although I suspect some backing vocals were by Barrett). The use of kazoos in this song would have been perfect as a Barrett composition. Wright's "Remember a Day" was apparently from the Piper sessions from the previous year (1967) so unsurprisingly it would be Barrett doing guitar duty here, although of course it was Wright handling the vocals. The title track is a highly experimental unstructured piece, which is a really daring thing for a band to do. A lot of use of percussion, then at the end, mellow use of Hammond organ and cosmic voices. If you're familiar with a lot of early '70s progressive space rock and Krautrock acts of the time, you can see where many of those bands got their inspiration from.Read more ›
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