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Saved


Price: CDN$ 10.10 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
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16 new from CDN$ 5.27 6 used from CDN$ 8.52

Frequently Bought Together

Saved + Slow Train Coming (Remastered) + Shot Of Love
Price For All Three: CDN$ 26.39


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Product Details

  • Audio CD (June 7 2011)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: SBME
  • ASIN: B0012GMW16
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #20,775 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Product Description

Amazing grace how sweet the sound! Traditional gospel flavors the background as the singer reaches for the heavens with songs like What Can I Do for You; Covenant Woman; Solid Rock, and Saving Grace.

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Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Bill R. Moore on Aug. 21 2003
Format: Audio CD
Bob Dylan's trilogy of albums released during the years 79-81, of which Saved is the second, have historically been referred to as his "Christian trilogy" or the albums released during his "born-again period." With the release of the excellent Gotta Serve Somebody: The Gospel Songs of Bob Dylan, which has led to a subsequent re-examination of all his work from that era, it is now being widely referred to as his "Gospel period." To be sure, all three albums contained strong religious overtones, Christian imagery, and gospel elements. However, the first of the albums, Slow Train Coming, was still firmly-rooted in rock music, backed, as it was, primarily by the members of Dire Straits, with some R&B elements intermixed. Shot of Love was a far more secular effort, with only a few overt religious songs and much more of a rock element. Saved, on the other hand, is Dylan's fully-fledged gospel effort, by God.
This is apparent from the opening of the very first track, a cover of A Satisfied Mind. This leads into the title track, with Dylan's most overt set of lyrics ever, up to that point. The lyrics throughout the entire album, in fact, are unabashedly Christian. Some of the songs on Slow Train were somewhat ambiguous, and could be taken in more than one way -- I Believe In You, for instance, which could just as easily be a statement of dedication to a loved one as a testament to Christ -- and Shot of Love contained much material that was undoubtedly secular. Not Saved. Every track is a full-on gospel number. The music matches the lyrics accordingly. All of the songs contain huge, striking gospel arrangements, featuring superb piano-playing from legendary keyboardist Spooner Oldham, as well as some fantastic organ playing on a few tracks.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Dirk on March 30 2003
Format: Audio CD
Well, I tried to like this album when it was released and in many ways, I did like it a lot. Strangely, perhaps to some, I preferred the lyrics to the actual music. In recent years I have undergone some changes in my tastes in music, maybe one could even suggest 'maturing' (or maybe just getting older!). The thing that I now love about certain records, over everything else, is passion and sincerity, on which platform an artist can produce genuinely meaningful work. What I recognise about this album now, is that it is a masterwork. The vocal performances of Dylan and his amazing backup singers are passionate, heartfelt and intense. The band is road-hardened and ready to deliver what sounds like a live recording of very few takes. True to the spirit of the original [black] gospel sound I have no doubt that Dylan, always (I believe) a respecter of his musical forebears, pays tribute to the many great known & unknown performers of this wonderful genre. It's pure, unadulterated gospel music and is also an uncompromising and unrestrained rock and roll outburst. Quite simply, I love it and consider it to be one of his very best works.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Howard Sauertieg on March 14 2004
Format: Audio CD
Mr. Dylan's most strictly "Christian" album is not bad. Musically, it is quite stirring in places. Dylan's voice is deteriorating here, but his enthusiasm for the "message" he's trying to convey is always touching. He really sounds like a man who's been saved from "the fiery pit" in the nick of time.
In a way, SAVED is Dylan's "gospel" equivalent to NASHVILLE SKYLINE, his "country" album. He immersed himself in a genre, turned out some good-to-passable songs in the new idiom, then moved on to other things. Much of the criticism of Dylan's gospel work reeks of hypocrisy. Rock music "experts" like Dave Marsh did chastise Mr. Dylan for buying into a prepackaged ideology and trying to force it onto an unwilling public, while simultaneously lavishing their worthless praise on dead, quasi-literate black men like Blind Willie Johnson and Blind Gary Davis, both of whom sang almost nothing but gospel on street corners. (See the ROLLING STONE RECORD GUIDES of the 1980s.) So what if Dylan resembles more Blind Willie Johnson than he does Blind Willie McTell? Judge the music, not the man. Furthermore, the ideology of the "protest song" movement is fixed for all time, for anyone to adopt and make his own, if only to sell records to a target audience and make a name for himself - as Dylan did when he was young.
SAVED isn't a failure because it's a Christian album from end to end, or because its maker was an icon of the "counterculture." The problem with SAVED, I think, is that it was somewhat hastily thrown together between two evangelical tours, and poorly recorded at that. Dylan's lyrics on SAVED are atypically focused and straightforward, sometimes to the point of ridiculousness. "Are You Ready?
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Howard Sauertieg on March 14 2004
Format: Audio CD
Mr. Dylan's most strictly "Christian" album is not bad. Musically, it is quite stirring in places. Dylan's voice is deteriorating here, but his enthusiasm for the "message" he's trying to convey is always touching. He really sounds like a man who's been saved from "the fiery pit" in the nick of time.
Much of the criticism of Dylan's gospel work reeks of hypocrisy. Rock music "experts" like Dave Marsh did chastise Mr. Dylan for buying into a prepackaged ideology and trying to force it onto an unwilling public, while simultaneously lavishing their worthless praise on dead, quasi-literate black men like Blind Willie Johnson and Blind Gary Davis, both of whom sang almost nothing but gospel on street corners. (See the ROLLING STONE RECORD GUIDES of the 1980s.) So what if Dylan resembles more Blind Willie Johnson than he does Blind Willie McTell? Judge the music, not the man. Furthermore, the ideology of the "protest song" movement was (and is to some extent) fixed for all time, for anyone to adopt and make his own, if only to sell records to a target audience and make a name for himself - as Dylan did when he was young.
SAVED isn't a failure because it's a Christian album from end to end, or because its maker was an icon of the "counterculture." The problem with SAVED, I think, is that it was somewhat hastily thrown together between two evangelical tours, and poorly recorded at that. Dylan's lyrics on SAVED are atypically focused and straightforward, sometimes to the point of ridiculousness. "Are You Ready?
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