Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Scare Care Mass Market Paperback – Oct 8 1993


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 0.60
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 50.06 CDN$ 0.01

Join Amazon Student in Canada


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books (Oct. 8 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0812510976
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812510973
  • Product Dimensions: 16.8 x 10.7 x 1.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 204 g
  • Average Customer Review: 1.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,845,008 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

1.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
1
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Hardcover
On the one hand, Masterton came up with a really terrific idea -- dedicate the proceeds of a scary book to helping abused children. And he makes a good point, too, what we might read in horror stories is literally NOTHING compared to the real horrors abused children face every day.
On the other hand, I wonder if some of the stories in his collection might be better suited to other, less nobly designated forums
Perhaps it's just me, but I've always assumed that any event or object dedicated to the funding of children's causes would be more or less tailored so that children could actually participate in or enjoy it to some degree as well. It would seem odd, after all, if something dedicated to children is something children shouldn't touch.
The story selection in Scare Care is uneven. A few are truly great, such as the one by Harlan Ellison in which a man goes off in search of a truly original father. I could read them over and over again. Others are terrible, both in quality and in content, and I have to wonder what Masterton might have been thinking by including them in what could have been an otherwise stellar collection.
There are at least four incredibly gruesome stories included here, all prefaced by Masterton's declaration that although he had misgivings at first, he decided to override himself and put them in, since they did not REALLY contain very much in the way of gory themes. I'd like to make a point here: If, in a story, someone wanders around hacking and stabbing a family to pieces with various sharp objects, one by one by one, and if that someone happens to be a little child, it is VERY gory (and hugely inappropriate to a book dedicated to Helping Children).
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
A good read for lovers of short horror stories. Feb. 4 2000
By Alison Dennehy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Scare Care is worth buying simply because the intent of the editor, Graham Masterton, in compiling these stories was to help children in desperate need. However, Scare Care also stands on it's own feet as a genuinely good read for those of us who love this genre. Mommy, the first story in the book, is more of a feel good horror story than truly frightening, but springs from a very interesting concept nevertheless. You might, as I did, find a lump in your throat after reading Things Not Seen, and The Avenger of Death asked interesting questions about man's ability to mete out "justice". There were one or two stories included, such as Manny Agonistes and Changeling, which have been seen elsewhere and were more than worthy of a second, third or fourth read. (And) of course there were the usual stories which, while the endings were rather obvious, still make for an entertaining half hour before you turn out your light!
Several stories found their way into this book which we all really could have lived without, but what would a short story compilation be without a few clangers?
My recommendation - as an avid lover of short horror fiction - is; buy the book, be entertained but don't expect miracles.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
A good read for lovers of short horror stories. Feb. 4 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Scare Care is worth buying simply because the intent of the editor, Graham Masterton, in compiling these stories was to help children in desperate need. However, Scare Care also stands on it's own feet as a genuinely good read for those of us who love this genre. Mommy, the first story in the book, is more of a feel good horror story than truly frightening, but springs from a very interesting concept nevertheless. You might, as I did, find a lump in your throat after reading Things Not Seen, and The Avenger of Death asked interesting questions about man's ability to mete out "justice". There were one or two stories included, such as Manny Agonistes and Changeling, which have been seen elsewhere and were more than worthy of a second, third or fourth read. (And) of course there were the usual stories which, while the endings were rather obvious, still make for an entertaining half hour before you turn out your light!
Several stories found their way into this book which we all really could have lived without, but what would a short story compilation be without a few clangers?
My recommendation - as an avid reader of short horror fiction - is; buy the book, be entertained but don't expect miracles.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Good collection of stories, for admirable purpose Aug. 27 2012
By KinksRock - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This collection certainly gets high marks for its purpose. The writers donated their stories and any profits to benefit charities to combat child abuse. I'm not famliar with most of the writers, but that may be my own ignorance. Familiar names include Roald Dahl, Graham Masterton, and James Herbert.

There are many stories in the collection and, as usual with a collection of short horror stories (I find), it's a mixed bag. You are sure to find stories that you like in a collection this large, and also quite a few with a great premise but a let-down of an ending. Every once in a while there's one that really grabs you. I particularly enjoyed D.W. Taylor's "Good Night, Sweet Prince" (about how to deal with an evil child), Peter Valentine Timlett's "Little Miss Muffet" (about a woman tortured by arachnophobia), and Graham Masterton's "Changeling" (about a man who finds himself trapped in a woman's body).

Product Images from Customers

Search


Feedback