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Scare Care [Mass Market Paperback]

Graham Masterton
1.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

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Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Proceeds from this anthology benefit the Scare Care Trust, a charity set up to fund organizations that help abused and endangered children, which is administered by children's attorney and detective novelist Andrew Vachss. The authors represented here have donated 38 horror stories--all but seven original to the collection--many of which concern children. The best include Ramsey Campbell's atmospheric "Ferries," about a Flying Dutchman who comes for a very landlocked book editor; Bruce Boston's "Mammy and the Flies," in which a young boy's grandmother becomes as physically monstrous as she is cruel; James Herbert's "Breakfast," a story of a housewife's madness in a post-holocaust world; "The Wish," Roald Dahl's tale of a game of make-believe that gets out of hand; and William Relling Jr.'s "Table for None," in which a middle-aged bachelor discovers a diner that serves food as delicious as mother's, and learns that there can be too much of a good thing. There are also excellent stories by Ruth Rendell, Marc Laidlaw and Harlan Ellison, among others.
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

An anthology of 37 horror stories, nearly all written expressly for this volume, whose profits are being donated to charities specializing in care for abused children. If that alone doesn't make it worth the price, the authors include such heavy hitters as Harlan Ellison, James Herbert, and Ramsey Campbell.-- MR
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Most helpful customer reviews
1.0 out of 5 stars Dedicated to Abused Children, but NOT for children April 28 2004
Format:Hardcover
On the one hand, Masterton came up with a really terrific idea -- dedicate the proceeds of a scary book to helping abused children. And he makes a good point, too, what we might read in horror stories is literally NOTHING compared to the real horrors abused children face every day.
On the other hand, I wonder if some of the stories in his collection might be better suited to other, less nobly designated forums
Perhaps it's just me, but I've always assumed that any event or object dedicated to the funding of children's causes would be more or less tailored so that children could actually participate in or enjoy it to some degree as well. It would seem odd, after all, if something dedicated to children is something children shouldn't touch.
The story selection in Scare Care is uneven. A few are truly great, such as the one by Harlan Ellison in which a man goes off in search of a truly original father. I could read them over and over again. Others are terrible, both in quality and in content, and I have to wonder what Masterton might have been thinking by including them in what could have been an otherwise stellar collection.
There are at least four incredibly gruesome stories included here, all prefaced by Masterton's declaration that although he had misgivings at first, he decided to override himself and put them in, since they did not REALLY contain very much in the way of gory themes. I'd like to make a point here: If, in a story, someone wanders around hacking and stabbing a family to pieces with various sharp objects, one by one by one, and if that someone happens to be a little child, it is VERY gory (and hugely inappropriate to a book dedicated to Helping Children).
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars  3 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good read for lovers of short horror stories. Feb. 4 2000
By Alison Dennehy - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Scare Care is worth buying simply because the intent of the editor, Graham Masterton, in compiling these stories was to help children in desperate need. However, Scare Care also stands on it's own feet as a genuinely good read for those of us who love this genre. Mommy, the first story in the book, is more of a feel good horror story than truly frightening, but springs from a very interesting concept nevertheless. You might, as I did, find a lump in your throat after reading Things Not Seen, and The Avenger of Death asked interesting questions about man's ability to mete out "justice". There were one or two stories included, such as Manny Agonistes and Changeling, which have been seen elsewhere and were more than worthy of a second, third or fourth read. (And) of course there were the usual stories which, while the endings were rather obvious, still make for an entertaining half hour before you turn out your light!
Several stories found their way into this book which we all really could have lived without, but what would a short story compilation be without a few clangers?
My recommendation - as an avid lover of short horror fiction - is; buy the book, be entertained but don't expect miracles.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good read for lovers of short horror stories. Feb. 4 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Scare Care is worth buying simply because the intent of the editor, Graham Masterton, in compiling these stories was to help children in desperate need. However, Scare Care also stands on it's own feet as a genuinely good read for those of us who love this genre. Mommy, the first story in the book, is more of a feel good horror story than truly frightening, but springs from a very interesting concept nevertheless. You might, as I did, find a lump in your throat after reading Things Not Seen, and The Avenger of Death asked interesting questions about man's ability to mete out "justice". There were one or two stories included, such as Manny Agonistes and Changeling, which have been seen elsewhere and were more than worthy of a second, third or fourth read. (And) of course there were the usual stories which, while the endings were rather obvious, still make for an entertaining half hour before you turn out your light!
Several stories found their way into this book which we all really could have lived without, but what would a short story compilation be without a few clangers?
My recommendation - as an avid reader of short horror fiction - is; buy the book, be entertained but don't expect miracles.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good collection of stories, for admirable purpose Aug. 27 2012
By KinksRock - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
This collection certainly gets high marks for its purpose. The writers donated their stories and any profits to benefit charities to combat child abuse. I'm not famliar with most of the writers, but that may be my own ignorance. Familiar names include Roald Dahl, Graham Masterton, and James Herbert.

There are many stories in the collection and, as usual with a collection of short horror stories (I find), it's a mixed bag. You are sure to find stories that you like in a collection this large, and also quite a few with a great premise but a let-down of an ending. Every once in a while there's one that really grabs you. I particularly enjoyed D.W. Taylor's "Good Night, Sweet Prince" (about how to deal with an evil child), Peter Valentine Timlett's "Little Miss Muffet" (about a woman tortured by arachnophobia), and Graham Masterton's "Changeling" (about a man who finds himself trapped in a woman's body).
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