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Science and Evolution [Paperback]

Charles Colson , Nancy Pearcey
2.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

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Book Description

Oct. 15 2001 Developing a Christian Worldview Series
Each of these three books (Developing a Christian Worldview of Science and Evolution, Developing a Christian Worldview of the Problem of Evil, and Developing a Christian Worldview of the Christian in Today's Culture) is drawn from Colson's highly successful How Now Shall We Live? Shorter in length and accessible to readers, the Developing a Christian Worldview series is ideal for small-group study and classroom use. Each chapter begins with pre-reading questions, and each study session is made up of newly written discussion questions, role-playing activities, and challenges to implement key insights. All are designed to help readers grasp Colson's arguments and learn how to use the points effectively with non-Christians.

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Customer Reviews

2.3 out of 5 stars
2.3 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Keeps the issues clear March 18 2002
Format:Paperback
The target audience of this series, as I understand it, is the average church-going Christian who would like to express his views to both family (esp. kids) and friends with a much better understanding of the issues - without having to get a doctorate in molecular biology. The target audience is not academia, nor 'intelligensia' - but that does not mean this book is neither academic nor intelligent.
Addressing the first of the three general worldview questions "Where did we come from?", "What went wrong?", and basically "How do we fix it?", this book keeps the issues of the *theory* of evolution and the *theory* of creation very clear.
Colson and his co-author discuss the 'faith vs. science' myth - (that they are somehow 'opposites'), as well as the Naturalism vs. Christianity debate. They point out that the latter is not a science vs. faith debate, but in fact philosophy vs. philosophy - that we don't fight science with the bible, but we fight bad science (or science so-called) with better science. They mention that naturalism and evolution are not truly scientific, being untestable and therefore 'unprovable.' They remind our detractors that there should be at least one piece of archaelogical evidence of a 'transitional form,' if this process has truly been going on for 14 million years (or whatever the current estimate), and has produced the human the eye, the brain, the lymphatic, cardiovascular, muskuloskeletal, reproductive, nervous, and digestive systems, etc...
Don't be dissuaded; this book is a decent exposition of the issues at hand for the common man, while adding in enough science to settle the issue for most (non-Christians) - at least the ones that I've talked to.
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2.0 out of 5 stars a disappointment Jan. 13 2002
Format:Paperback
As a Christian, I found Colson's and Pearcey's magnum opun well worth reading, but this book (chapter in larger book) simply sides with the Intelligent Design side in the debate. I am sure the authors believe this is the Christian perspective, but I had hoped for insight into reconciling science and faith.
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1.0 out of 5 stars What A Disappointment! Dec 20 2001
Format:Paperback
What is badly needed is a case for a reasoned merger of Christian truth with scientific evolutionary theory. This has been eloquently done for Christian environmentalism, and I was looking forward to reading a thoughtful intellectual analysis of evolutionary theory and science from a Christian evangelical's perspective. What a disappointment! Colson and Pearcey had the opportunity to make a significant contribution, but chose instead to construct the usual tired strawman of equating science with naturalism and Christianity with allegiance to intelligent design. Neither naturalism nor intelligent design are science, and thus both are easily debunked from a scientific perspective.
Furthermore, Colson and Pearcey cannot even identify cogent new arguments for intelligent design. Instead they rely on naive and easily refuted arguments, such as the "irreducible complexity" of the eye (nonsense, there are numerous examples of intermediate stages of light recognition and processing) or that a fish evolving a lung would drown (we have air-breathing fish, and many amphibians change from a gill-breathing to a lung-breathing state).
In summary, if you want another stock argument for intelligent design, or if you like to read arguments that can easily be picked to pieces, get this book. Otherwise, don't bother.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 1.3 out of 5 stars  3 reviews
0 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Non-Scientists Speak March 24 2012
By John B. Lankford - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
A book on science/evolution etc. by two people whose only knowledge of lab-work wasprobably the chemistry -set they once got for Xmas!The best they can do is "parrot" the ID folks.
24 of 55 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars What A Disappointment! Dec 20 2001
By Eric Ribbens - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
What is badly needed is a case for a reasoned merger of Christian truth with scientific evolutionary theory. This has been eloquently done for Christian environmentalism, and I was looking forward to reading a thoughtful intellectual analysis of evolutionary theory and science from a Christian evangelical's perspective. What a disappointment! Colson and Pearcey had the opportunity to make a significant contribution, but chose instead to construct the usual tired strawman of equating science with naturalism and Christianity with allegiance to intelligent design. Neither naturalism nor intelligent design are science, and thus both are easily debunked from a scientific perspective.
Furthermore, Colson and Pearcey cannot even identify cogent new arguments for intelligent design. Instead they rely on naive and easily refuted arguments, such as the "irreducible complexity" of the eye (nonsense, there are numerous examples of intermediate stages of light recognition and processing) or that a fish evolving a lung would drown (we have air-breathing fish, and many amphibians change from a gill-breathing to a lung-breathing state).
In summary, if you want another stock argument for intelligent design, or if you like to read arguments that can easily be picked to pieces, get this book. Otherwise, don't bother.
7 of 24 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars a disappointment Jan. 12 2002
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
As a Christian, I found Colson's and Pearcey's magnum opun well worth reading, but this book (chapter in larger book) simply sides with the Intelligent Design side in the debate. I am sure the authors believe this is the Christian perspective, but I had hoped for insight into reconciling science and faith.
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