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The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Volume One 1929-1964: The Greatest Science Fiction Stories of All Time Chosen by the Members of the Science Fiction Writers of America [Paperback]

Robert Silverberg
4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
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Book Description

Jan. 13 2005 SF Hall of Fame (Book 1)
The definitive collection of the best in science fiction stories between 1929-1964.

This book contains twenty-six of the greatest science fiction stories ever written. They represent the considered verdict of the Science Fiction Writers of America, those who have shaped the genre and who know, more intimately than anyone else, what the criteria for excellence in the field should be. The authors chosen for The Science Fiction Hall Fame are the men and women who have shaped the body and heart of modern science fiction; their brilliantly imaginative creations continue to inspire and astound new generations of writers and fans.

Robert Heinlein in "The Roads Must Roll" describes an industrial civilization of the future caught up in the deadly flaws of its own complexity. "Country of the Kind," by Damon Knight, is a frightening portrayal of biological mutation. "Nightfall," by Isaac Asimov, one of the greatest stories in the science fiction field, is the story of a planet where the sun sets only once every millennium and is a chilling study in mass psychology.

Originally published in 1970 to honor those writers and their stories that had come before the institution of the Nebula Awards, The Science Fiction Hall Of Fame, Volume One, was the book that introduced tens of thousands of young readers to the wonders of science fiction. Too long unavailable, this new edition will treasured by all science fiction fans everywhere.

The Science Fiction Hall Of Fame, Volume One, includes the following stories:

Introduction by Robert Silverberg
"A Martian Odyssey" by Stanley G. Weinbaum
"Twilight" by John W. Campbell
"Helen O'Loy" by Lester del Rey
"The Roads Must Roll" by Robert A. Heinlein
"Microcosmic God" by Theodore Sturgeon
"Nightfall" by Isaac Asimov
"The Weapon Shop" by A. E. van Vogt
"Mimsy Were the Borogoves" by Lewis Padgett
"Huddling Place" by Clifford D. Simak
"Arena" by Frederic Brown
"First Contact" by Murray Leinster
"That Only a Mother" by Judith Merril
"Scanners Live in Vain" by Cordwainer Smith
"Mars is Heaven!" by Ray Bradbury
"The Little Black Bag" by C. M. Kornbluth
"Born of Man and Woman" by Richard Matheson
"Coming Attraction" by Fritz Leiber
"The Quest for Saint Aquin" by Anthony Boucher
"Surface Tension" by James Blish
"The Nine Billion Names of God" by Arthur C. Clarke
"It's a Good Life" by Jerome Bixby
"The Cold Equations" by Tom Godwin
"Fondly Fahrenheit" by Alfred Bester
"The Country of the Kind," Damon Knight
"Flowers for Algernon" by Daniel Keyes
"A Rose for Ecclesiastes" by Roger Zelazny

Frequently Bought Together

The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Volume One 1929-1964: The Greatest Science Fiction Stories of All Time Chosen by the Members of the Science Fiction Writers of America + The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Volume Two A: The Greatest Science Fiction Novellas of All Time Chosen by the Members of The Science Fiction Writers of America + The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Volume Two B: The Greatest Science Fiction Novellas of All Time Chosen by the Members of the Science Fiction Writers of America
Price For All Three: CDN$ 49.59


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From Amazon

If you own only one anthology of classic science fiction, it should be The Science Fiction Hall of Fame: Volume One, 1929-1964. Selected by a vote of the membership of the Science Fiction Writers of America (SFWA), these 26 reprints represent the best, most important, and most influential stories and authors in the field. The contributors are a Who's Who of classic SF, with every Golden Age giant included: Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury, Arthur C. Clarke, John W. Campbell, Robert A. Heinlein, Fritz Leiber, Cordwainer Smith, Theodore Sturgeon, and Roger Zelazny. Other contributors are less well known outside the core SF readership. Three of the contributors are famous for one story--but what stories!--Tom Godwin's pivotal hard-SF tale, "The Cold Equations"; Jerome Bixby's "It's a Good Life" (made only more infamous by the chilling Twilight Zone adaptation); and Daniel Keyes's "Flowers for Algernon" (brought to mainstream fame by the movie adaptation, Charly).

The collection has some minor but frustrating flaws. There are no contributor biographies, which is bad enough when the author is a giant; but it's especially sad for contributors who have become unjustly obscure. Each story's original publication date is in small print at the bottom of the first page. And neither this fine print nor the copyright page identifies the magazines in which the stories first appeared.

Prefaced by editor Robert Silverberg's introduction, which describes SFWA and details the selection process, The Science Fiction Hall of Fame: Volume One, 1929-1964 is a wonderful book for the budding SF fan. Experienced SF readers should compare the table of contents to their library before making a purchase decision. Fans who contemplate giving this book to non-SF readers should bear in mind that, while several of the collected stories can measure up to classic mainstream literary stories, the less literarily-acceptable stories are weighted toward the front of the collection; adult mainstream-literature fans may not get very far into The Science Fiction Hall of Fame: Volume One, 1929-1964. --Cynthia Ward --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"A basic one-volume library of the short science fiction story."--Kirkus on The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Volume One

"Quibbling about the choice of the prize winners would be like arguing with the pros who vote on the Academy Awards."--Publishers Weekly on The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Volume One

"The first definitive modern anthology of top science fiction stories."--Newark Sunday News on The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Volume One

"Libraries can toss out worn collections of partly good/partly poor and buy this volume of the creme de la creme."--Library Journal on The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Volume One

"Not for years has there appeared a collection of stories so remarkable, so profoundly enjoyable, so full of that marvelous 'remember when' quality, and, for the absolute beginner, so rewarding and informative a reading experience."--Theodore Sturgeon in the National Review on The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Volume One


"A basic one-volume library of the short science fiction story." (Kirkus)

"Quibbling about the choice of the prize winners would be like arguing with the pros who vote on the Academy Awards." (Publishers Weekly)

"The first definitive modern anthology of top science fiction stories." (Newark Sunday News)

"Libraries can toss out worn collections of partly good/partly poor and buy this volume of the creme de la creme." (Library Journal)

"Not for years has there appeared a collection of stories so remarkable, so profoundly enjoyable, so full of that marvelous 'remember when' quality." (Theodore Sturgeon National Review)

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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Rise and Passage of the Golden Age June 12 2004
Format:Mass Market Paperback
This book takes you on a journey through the Golden Age of science fiction, and into the first steps of the New Age. It isn't true that this contains the "greatest science fiction stories of all time," because it only contains work prior to 1963 (this anthology was first published in 1970).
A few of the stories will seem campy by today's standards. "Martian Odyssey," by Stanley Weinbaum (1934) will show you just how far today's authors have come in terms of storytelling and prose styling. From those humble beginnings, the genre takes off like a rocket.
John Campbell's "Twighlight" (1934) show many of the themes and ideas--alienation, wonder, potential misuse of science--that would often define the Golden Age. "Nightfall" by Isaac Asimov (1941) is probably the best of the early stories, showing perfect plotting and construction, combined with scientific ideas and thinking. As time marches on, we encounter such stories as "Scanners Live in Vain," by Cordwainer Smith (1948) which shows us a future society without burying us under the type of exposition that previously weighed-down other work; by 1954, we have "Fondly Fahrenheit," by Alfred Bester, a head-spinning, poetic, tour de force of a tale. "Flowers for Algernon" (1959) is one of the best-plotted, most poignant tales of the Golden Age. The book ends with "A Rose for Ecclesiastes," rife with the poetic, experimental style that would become a theme for much of the science fiction literature of the New Wave.
Unfortunately, a few of the stories don't age that well--and it is necessary for readers to realize that science fiction has continued to evolve in the decades since this book's publication. Nevertheless, it contains a large number of wonderful stories and--and serves as a schematic for the genre's development over four decades.
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4.0 out of 5 stars a nostalgic winner for science fiction buffs Feb. 1 2004
Format:Hardcover
This is a reprint of a classic 1970 work in which The Science Fiction Writers of America members voted on what selections should be included in The Greatest Science Fiction Stories of All Time anthologies. The first volume includes twenty-six tales from 1929 through 1964 from some of the genre's greatest authors, a who's who. The criteria used were not the author's fame but instead, the most important and influential stories and that, in spite of the votes, an author would appear only once.
Though three decades have passed, most of the contributors remain highly renowned even outside the genre, but a few are less famous except among long time purists. Thus the lack of a one-page biography hurts when a virtually unrecognizable name has authored a famous work especially when other media mainstreamed the tale. Still each story is well written and affirms why the ASFWA selected them thirty years ago. This is a winner mostly for science fiction buffs and the nostalgic amongst the boomers.
Harriet Klausner
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5.0 out of 5 stars Bought for �Mimsy Were the Borogoves� June 4 2003
By bernie TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover
This book is truly a collection of great stories from between the years of 1929 and 1964. I am glad they reprinted this book because my older version is yellowing. I hope one day they will reprint a new hard back copy and I will buy it also.
Even though this book is packed from cover to cover with intriguing stories, I bought it for one story in particular "Mimsy Were the Borogoves" by Lewis Padgett. First published in 1943 ("Lewis Padgett" was a pseudonym employed by Henry Kuttner and his wife, C. L. Moore)
My first encounter with this story was a vinyl record recording with William Shatner later it is replaces with a cassette tape. I believe this book is the only surviving form of the story.
Unthahorsten is experimenting with time travel and sends two black boxes back into the past. He had to put something in them so as a last minute thought places his old toys in them. They do not return so he forgets them. It is too late the mischief is done. One is found by children in 1942. The other well look at the title for a clue.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Mostly classics May 6 2003
Format:Hardcover
Long out of print, these 26 stories include classics from the big names of the second third of the 20th century - Ray Bradbury, Isaac Asimov, Arthur C. Clarke, Roger Zelazny. Playful, speculative or cautionary, they home in on the futuristic preoccupations of their day. Robert Heinlein's "The Roads Must Roll" explores the flaws inherent in a perfectly mechanized society, Theodore Sturgeon's "Microcosmic God," posits a scientist who creates a new life form for his own edification and the only woman represented, Judith Merrill, has a cautionary tale about radiation, "That Only A Mother."
Isaac Asimov's "Nightfall," imagines a dire fate for a planet that plunges into night only once every 2,500 years, Ray Bradbury's "Mars Is Heaven!" describes a fateful first contact for hapless Americans, and Roger Bixby's "It's a GOOD Life" gives us the mortal fear of powerful children.
The earliest stories are mostly of historical interest - their encounters with aliens and thinking robots are a bit heavy handed in the prose department - but most are still fresh and timeless. These are stories that inspired a generation of writers and readers, spawning imitations and movies and Twilight Zone episodes. A must for genuine sci-fi fans.
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4.0 out of 5 stars mostly for science fiction buffs March 16 2003
Format:Hardcover
This is a reprint of a classic 1970 work in which The Science Fiction Writers of America members voted on what selections should be included in The Greatest Science Fiction Stories of All Time anthologies. The first volume includes twenty-six tales from 1929 through 1964 from some of the genre's greatest authors, a who's who. The criteria used were not the author's fame but instead, the most important and influential stories and that, in spite of the votes, an author would appear only once.
Though three decades have passed, most of the contributors remain highly renowned even outside the genre, but a few are less famous except among long time purists. Thus the lack of a one-page biography hurts when a virtually unrecognizable name has authored a famous work especially when other media mainstreamed the tale. Still each story is well written and affirms why the ASFWA selected them thirty years ago. This is a winner mostly for science fiction buffs and the nostalgic amongst the boomers.
Harriet Klausner
Was this review helpful to you?
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Most recent customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars book
very good book and very good stories (story) when you start reading it you can't stop ever after I recommand it
Published 13 months ago by Claude Couillard
5.0 out of 5 stars The Old That is Strong Does Not Wither
This collection of the best science fiction stories between 1929 and 1964 was assembled by the Science Fiction Writers of America and has the high quality that results from an... Read more
Published 19 months ago by John M. Ford
5.0 out of 5 stars A trip down memory lane
I've checked it out of the library more than once, but this is such a good book to own. If you want to see how science fiction is done, or learn how to write it yourself, this is... Read more
Published on July 12 2004 by "newyorkcityreader"
5.0 out of 5 stars A Classic Must-Have for All Sci-Fi Fans
I bought this book when it first came out in 1970 when I joined the Science Fiction Book Club, and it is my favorite collection to this day. Read more
Published on April 7 2004 by Samwise Gamgee
5.0 out of 5 stars I know this will be good but ...
Can someone list the titles and authors of all the stories in this book???
Thanks!!!!!!!!!!
Published on Jan. 8 2004 by F.
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential
If I was stuck for life on a desert island, there are two
SF books I would take with me--Anthony Boucher's two-volume _A
Treasury of Great Science Fiction,_ and _The... Read more
Published on Oct. 10 2003 by R. Wallace
5.0 out of 5 stars All Classics
I have the Avon paperback first edition from 1971, it's falling apart from re-readings over the years. Read more
Published on May 15 2003 by Steven L. Davis
5.0 out of 5 stars A return of a classic
The Science Fiction Hall of Fame is an essential for any science fiction fan. Each of the twenty-six stories in it are all consitered classics in the field, by classic authors such... Read more
Published on Feb. 21 2003 by Andrew
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