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The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Volume One 1929-1964: The Greatest Science Fiction Stories of All Time Chosen by the Members of the Science Fiction Writers of America Paperback – Jan 13 2005


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The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Volume One 1929-1964: The Greatest Science Fiction Stories of All Time Chosen by the Members of the Science Fiction Writers of America + The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Volume Two A: The Greatest Science Fiction Novellas of All Time Chosen by the Members of The Science Fiction Writers of America + The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Volume Two B: The Greatest Science Fiction Novellas of All Time Chosen by the Members of the Science Fiction Writers of America
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 576 pages
  • Publisher: Orb Books (Jan. 13 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9780765305374
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765305374
  • ASIN: 0765305372
  • Product Dimensions: 21.1 x 14 x 2.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 635 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #55,608 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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By Claude Couillard on July 30 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
very good book and very good stories (story) when you start reading it you can't stop ever after I recommand it
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By John M. Ford TOP 100 REVIEWER on Feb. 21 2013
Format: Paperback
This collection of the best science fiction stories between 1929 and 1964 was assembled by the Science Fiction Writers of America and has the high quality that results from an expert-driven selection process. The twenty-six stories are all good and all by name authors, although they weren't all "names" when they wrote them.

My favorite six--and this wasn't easy--are:

Frederic Brown's "Arena" was made into a Star Trek episode which pitted William Shatner against an unknown stunt man in a rubber reptile suit. This original story of a human versus a well-rounded alien in a fight to the death is better.

Murray Leinster's "First Contact" named an entire SF sub-genre. The aliens and humans meet, learn to communicate, and then need to figure out a way to get home without endangering both of their worlds.

C. M. Kornbluth's "The Little Black Bag" hints at a future where many people aren't too bright. One of them loses a bag of medical instruments all the way into the past. And somebody finds it.

Tom Godwin's "The Cold Equations" illustrates the danger of taking along just enough of everything--air, fuel, mass--on a space trip. There is always the unexpected.

Damon Knight's "The Country of the Kind" examines the life of a lonely man who keeps reaching out for others. Something always gets in the way. This story may have influenced Anthony Burgess' A Clockwork Orange.

Daniel Keyes' "Flowers for Algernon" introduces Charlie Gordon, a mentally handicapped man whose life changes when he participates in a surgical experiment designed to improve intelligence.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By "jradoff" on June 12 2004
Format: Paperback
This book takes you on a journey through the Golden Age of science fiction, and into the first steps of the New Age. It isn't true that this contains the "greatest science fiction stories of all time," because it only contains work prior to 1963 (this anthology was first published in 1970).
A few of the stories will seem campy by today's standards. "Martian Odyssey," by Stanley Weinbaum (1934) will show you just how far today's authors have come in terms of storytelling and prose styling. From those humble beginnings, the genre takes off like a rocket.
John Campbell's "Twighlight" (1934) show many of the themes and ideas--alienation, wonder, potential misuse of science--that would often define the Golden Age. "Nightfall" by Isaac Asimov (1941) is probably the best of the early stories, showing perfect plotting and construction, combined with scientific ideas and thinking. As time marches on, we encounter such stories as "Scanners Live in Vain," by Cordwainer Smith (1948) which shows us a future society without burying us under the type of exposition that previously weighed-down other work; by 1954, we have "Fondly Fahrenheit," by Alfred Bester, a head-spinning, poetic, tour de force of a tale. "Flowers for Algernon" (1959) is one of the best-plotted, most poignant tales of the Golden Age. The book ends with "A Rose for Ecclesiastes," rife with the poetic, experimental style that would become a theme for much of the science fiction literature of the New Wave.
Unfortunately, a few of the stories don't age that well--and it is necessary for readers to realize that science fiction has continued to evolve in the decades since this book's publication. Nevertheless, it contains a large number of wonderful stories and--and serves as a schematic for the genre's development over four decades.
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Format: Hardcover
I've checked it out of the library more than once, but this is such a good book to own. If you want to see how science fiction is done, or learn how to write it yourself, this is the collection for you. It's a who's who of the grandmasters at the top of their game. There isn't a single story here that won't provoke or haunt you in some way shape or form.
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Format: Hardcover
I bought this book when it first came out in 1970 when I joined the Science Fiction Book Club, and it is my favorite collection to this day. Sure the stories are dated, some of them, and the style is old fashioned sometimes, but they are all excellent stories. Even re-reading them is a joy. If you are serious about sci-fi this is truly a must-have volume. There were several volumes that followed (2a and 2b for example) but this book remains my favorite. I am grateful for the chance to get it in a better hardback quality than the book club version. BUY THIS BOOK!
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Format: Hardcover
This is a reprint of a classic 1970 work in which The Science Fiction Writers of America members voted on what selections should be included in The Greatest Science Fiction Stories of All Time anthologies. The first volume includes twenty-six tales from 1929 through 1964 from some of the genre's greatest authors, a who's who. The criteria used were not the author's fame but instead, the most important and influential stories and that, in spite of the votes, an author would appear only once.
Though three decades have passed, most of the contributors remain highly renowned even outside the genre, but a few are less famous except among long time purists. Thus the lack of a one-page biography hurts when a virtually unrecognizable name has authored a famous work especially when other media mainstreamed the tale. Still each story is well written and affirms why the ASFWA selected them thirty years ago. This is a winner mostly for science fiction buffs and the nostalgic amongst the boomers.
Harriet Klausner
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