Auto boutiques-francophones Simple and secure cloud storage Personal Care All-New Kindle Paperwhite Music Deals Store Fall Tools Cook
Buy Used
CDN$ 16.00
+ CDN$ 6.49 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by dustjacket7
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Publisher: Viking
Date of Publication: 1998
Binding: hard cover
Edition:
Condition: Very Good +/As New
Description: 0670879908 near fine hard cover in near fine unclipped dj now in mylar. Smal smudge mark to fore edge and slight shelf wear to base of spine, Clean tight and unmarked. 384pp nf/nf
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Scotty Bowman A Life In Hockey Hardcover – Oct 1 1998


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover, Oct 1 1998
CDN$ 85.54 CDN$ 15.42

Unlimited FREE Two-Day Shipping for Six Months When You Try Amazon Student
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.




Product Details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Viking Canada (Oct. 1 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0670879908
  • ISBN-13: 978-0670879908
  • Product Dimensions: 2.5 x 2.5 x 2.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 748 g
  • Average Customer Review: 2.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,087,967 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Library Journal

Only Toe Blake of the Montreal Canadiens coached as many Stanley Cup winners (seven) as Scotty Bowman has over his lengthy NHL career. Bowman worked his way up from coaching at the Junior grade to both coaching and serving in a variety of high-level administrative posts for a number of mostly successful NHL teams. His biography reads like a history of the NHL over the past half-century, detailing the fortunes of its best teams and the backgrounds of its most famous players. In the middle of it all is Bowman, though Hunter (Champions, LJ 10/1/97) doesn't give us much of a personal view of the man. Bowman's own words read like quotes from the next day's newspaper. Interviews with former players and assistants afford some perspective, but more depth is needed. Nevertheless, Bowman's stature and the wealth of detail here will be of interest to hockey fans.?John M. Maxymuk, Rutgers Univ. Lib., Camden, NJ
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

About the Author

Douglas Hunter is a freelance writer, editor and graphic designer. He is the author of the bestselling and critically acclaimed Open Ice: The Tim Horton Story, A Breed Apart: An Illustrated History of Goaltending, War Games: Conn Smythe and Hockey’s Fighting Men and Champions: An Illustrated History of Hockey’s Greatest Dynasties, as well as two books on yacht racing, Against the Odds and Trials (with co-author Jeff Boyd). --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

2.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Dec 9 1998
Format: Hardcover
Those intrigued with the Bowman legend-mystique will not find the answer to the perennial question "What makes Scotty Bowman tick?" here. This is not a biography and Hunter does not set out to entertain. Next to no attention is paid to Bowman's childhood, youth, or even to what drew him to the game in the first place. Rather this book is a straightforward, if somewhat dry, portrait of post-expansion hockey and Bowman's role in it. Its chief strength is its history of the architecture of the franchises in which Bowman has spent his career. Any gleaning the reader may be pick up as to the creation of Bowman's character or the methods of his success are, at best, inferred (although Hunter does put forth a convincing case to dispel the myth that Jean-Guy Talbot ended Bowman's playing career). Plenty of quotes from Bowman's associates are included, both pro and con (Bowman himself declined to be interviewed for this work). Yet for a volume that appears to be well documented, steeped in statistics and numbers, I found at least five immediate errors, not the least of which are the year of Bowman's birth, and the 1989 Conn Smythe Trophy winner (it was Al MacInnis -- a fact easily verified in the NHL record book -- not Mike Vernon, as Hunter surprisingly states.) If I found these errors, how many others will other readers find, and how reliable is the rest of the information?
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Oct. 10 1999
Format: Hardcover
This is one of the worst books I have ever read in my entire life. On top of the author being extremely boring, he can't even get his facts right. There were numerous errors in the book. The most blatant being the author stating that Mike Vernon won the 1989 Conn Smythe award when in fact is was Al MacInnis. Another error I found was in starting goaltending. The book says that Garth Snow started game one of the 1997 Stanley Cup finals, when in fact it was Ron Hextall. If I picked out these simple errors in the book, how can I believe any of the other information in it? The author and publisher should be ashamed of themselves for letting hockey fans read such a book. The author is a disgrace to hockey. Don't waste your time reading this book.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Y. Lavoie on Aug. 2 2007
Format: Paperback
I was looking for an insight to his coaching philosophy...didn't get it. Terrible book, finally stopped reading on p. 275. Just a recollection of facts. Useless!
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Norm Innocente on July 6 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
EXCELLENT READ!! ENJOYED IT IMMENSELY.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 6 reviews
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
Just Stop Reading Oct. 10 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This is one of the worst books I have ever read in my entire life. On top of the author being extremely boring, he can't even get his facts right. There were numerous errors in the book. The most blatant being the author stating that Mike Vernon won the 1989 Conn Smythe award when in fact is was Al MacInnis. Another error I found was in starting goaltending. The book says that Garth Snow started game one of the 1997 Stanley Cup finals, when in fact it was Ron Hextall. If I picked out these simple errors in the book, how can I believe any of the other information in it? The author and publisher should be ashamed of themselves for letting hockey fans read such a book. The author is a disgrace to hockey. Don't waste your time reading this book.
17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
Reader Beware Dec 9 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Those intrigued with the Bowman legend-mystique will not find the answer to the perennial question "What makes Scotty Bowman tick?" here. This is not a biography and Hunter does not set out to entertain. Next to no attention is paid to Bowman's childhood, youth, or even to what drew him to the game in the first place. Rather this book is a straightforward, if somewhat dry, portrait of post-expansion hockey and Bowman's role in it. Its chief strength is its history of the architecture of the franchises in which Bowman has spent his career. Any gleaning the reader may be pick up as to the creation of Bowman's character or the methods of his success are, at best, inferred (although Hunter does put forth a convincing case to dispel the myth that Jean-Guy Talbot ended Bowman's playing career). Plenty of quotes from Bowman's associates are included, both pro and con (Bowman himself declined to be interviewed for this work). Yet for a volume that appears to be well documented, steeped in statistics and numbers, I found at least five immediate errors, not the least of which are the year of Bowman's birth, and the 1989 Conn Smythe Trophy winner (it was Al MacInnis -- a fact easily verified in the NHL record book -- not Mike Vernon, as Hunter surprisingly states.) If I found these errors, how many others will other readers find, and how reliable is the rest of the information?
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Author and Publisher Should be Ashamed Jan. 29 2009
By J_099 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This ridiculous effort lacks any meaningful depth on Scotty Bowman and is loaded with a long stream of convoluted hockey history, some of which is factually incorrect.
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Do NOT purchase this book June 24 2002
By Danny - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This book was horrible. I can't believe I actually made it through the 100 pages. The author talks WAY too much about the history of the league and some of the teams and not nearly enough about Scotty. In short, it was a terrible waste of time and money.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Unauthorized, Incomplete, But Worth Reading July 1 2011
By Hallauthor - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Hard to figure some of the vitriol surrounding some of the other customer reviews. Yes, there are a few very minor factual errors that an astute editor should have caught and that an author with Hunter's reputation should have known. But this is a worthy read for anyone interested in the game's greatest coach. Without Bowman's full authorization, it is impossible to get a complete picture of the man ( I know that several of his players were not forthcoming because he did not authorize the work ), but Hunter does a good job setting the scene for the hockey world that Bowman came out of, and how different it was from the hockey world that he eventually mastered.

This work is a good, if incomplete, look at the legend.


Feedback