Food Security for the Faint of Heart and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 12.24
  • List Price: CDN$ 16.95
  • You Save: CDN$ 4.71 (28%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Food Security for the Fai... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Food Security for the Faint of Heart Paperback – Sep 1 2008


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 12.24
CDN$ 6.78 CDN$ 5.75

2014 Books Gift Guide
Thug Kitchen is featured in our 2014 Books Gift Guide. More gift ideas

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought



Product Details


Product Description

Review

Where would you find your groceries if your supermarket's shelves were suddenly empty? The threat of earthquakes, trucker strikes, power outages or a global market collapse make us vulnerable like never before. With spiralling fuel prices and unstable world economies, individuals and communities are demanding more control over their food supply.

Food Security for the Faint of Heart is designed to gently ease readers into a more empowered place so that shocks to our food supply can be handled confidently. As well as acquiring new skills and ideas, there are other compelling reasons to get better prepared. The local economy gains support and encouragement to expand, in turn boosting food's taste and nutritional value, along with the health of people and ecosystems. Community support helps low-income families eat higher quality food, and the preparation provides a psychological edge in an emergency.

Chapters are devoted to useful, transferable skills, including:

  • Preserving garden food
  • Saving freezer food during a power outage
  • Managing through an earthquake
  • Preparing quick herbal medicinals
  • Foraging for wild food.

A humorous treatment of a sometimes threatening topic, this book will appeal to both long-time food security advocates, as well as to newcomers to the topic who are wary of it all and would prefer to avoid it.

(2008-05-07)

About the Author

Robin Wheeler is a permaculture activist, author, teacher and founder of the Sustainable Living Arts School. She teaches traditional skills, sustenance gardening and medicinals at Edible Landscapes (www.ediblelandscapes.ca), a nursery and teaching garden in Roberts Creek, British Columbia.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.ca
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 16 reviews
34 of 37 people found the following review helpful
Avoid the Zombie Apocolypse (or, you know - bad weather) Oct. 28 2009
By Sara J. Lutz - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Unlike a lot of books in this field - this ISN'T a hysterical threatening account of how we are doomed to huddle in caves clutching a last lone can of spam as the zombie hordes overwhelm the world. Its a calm, lighthearted, but well written manual for dealing with the simple fact that, well, crap happens. No matter where you live, at some point you are going to have to deal with either a blizzard, a blackout, or just a night when the roads are too slick to venture forth to the grocery story... and how to prepare for those issues ahead of time. The moment the ice storm starts is a wee bit too late to realize you have nothing in the cupboard - and the author works really hard to explain how to avoid that scenario.

The world is too full of easily hysterical people who panic when the rain falls. Buy this book and avoid the herds of people who only remember AFTER the hurricane is sighted that they must, right now, this minutes, go to the store and buy water.

When even the government is telling folks that they need to be able to manage for a few weeks (or months) in times of crisis - this is a great book to start walking you through the process of preparing. Preparing for what?

Life.

And this book proves it doesn't have to be any more dramatic than that.
14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
Food Scarcity is No Myth April 11 2009
By Story Circle Book Reviews - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Food security is a big issue, and growing bigger and more challenging by the minute--not just for people in the developing world, but for those of us lucky enough to live where food is abundant. If you're wondering where you would find food in an emergency--a natural disaster, an extended power outage, a labor strike--this book is for you. And if you're planning to grow some of your own groceries (who isn't, in these lean times?), you'll find plenty of help in this smart, funny and easy-to-read book.

Wheeler includes information based on personal hands-on experience about dealing with food supplies in sudden emergencies, stockpiling, buying organic, managing a garden (from seedtime to harvest and points in between), and wild foraging (for those hungry souls caught in the lurch without a pantry or a garden). She also offers suggestions for finding and preparing plant medicines, harvesting rainwater, and building a food community in your neighborhood. Very helpful: ten techniques for storing food and "compromise" gardens for people who lack the time, space, money, and energy for large-scale gardening.

While you may be able to find more detailed information elsewhere, Food Security for the Faint of Heart is a great place to begin. It will help you start thinking, planning, and preparing for the day when food may be suddenly scarce and you still have the urge to go on eating.

by Susan Wittig Albert
for Story Circle Book Reviews
reviewing books by, for, and about women
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Charming and informative March 24 2010
By Big Jon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Robin Wheeler has thoroughly covered the subject of food security in a funny, lighthearted way. Her writing style and humor are delightful and I got the feeling that I would like to meet her in person.

This is not just a book about storing emergency food, but a book of suggestions on how to take control of your food supply, eat healthier and have some peace of mind...and maybe even have a little fun doing it. She makes you want to try some of her suggestions.

She presents several interesting recipes, written in a happy-go-lucky way that makes you believe you can't fail. I intend to try her Potato-Leek soup...but I might just use scallions instead of Leeks! What the heck.

I recommend this book highly.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Well-written, fun to read, easy to follow basic food storage June 15 2010
By Jean Cottel - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have read about food storage off and on for years and this is one of the best -- well-written and engaging. The initial suggestions for getting started on a rotating storage system are easy and doable for most people... no giant root cellar construction needed.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Something to keep at hand in case the worst occurs Dec 11 2008
By Midwest Book Review - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Worrying about where one is going to get their next meal is never something one wants to have to deal with. "Food Security for the Faint of Heart: Keeping Your Larder Full in Lean Times" is a book about preparation when crisis hits. In this modern world, everyone takes the existence of the supermarket for granted and has enough food for about a week, two at most. Covering the skills one needs to stay fed when disaster hits such as preservation, foraging, rationing, and more, "Food Security for the Faint of Heart" is something to keep at hand in case the worst occurs.


Feedback