Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Seeing I Paperback – Jul 1 1998


Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 69.22 CDN$ 25.79

Join Amazon Student in Canada


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: BBC Books (July 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0563405864
  • ISBN-13: 978-0563405863
  • Product Dimensions: 17.5 x 10.9 x 1.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 68 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,962,510 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

By sleeping sheepsnake on July 4 2002
Format: Paperback
This is an appealing Dr Who novel.
It solidifies the relationship between Sam and the Doctor, after they had been apart for so long. The plot itself has some interesting details involving implant-technology, and aliens that acquire their technology merely by wresting it away from other planets, the inhabitants of which have actually done all the work. This is a colony-world, so I don't mind the exceedingly human face of the culture, or the Earthisms; other aspects of the story are otherworldly enough.
The subplot concerns Sam's growing love for the Doctor. At first glance, it reads as superficial, as she seems most drawn to his appearance. But a few passages allow for a deeper look, and given the fact that the TV show was on so long and, to my knowledge, this type of subplot was not mined, I'm all for it.
I also like the groundwork laid down for revelations that take place in the novel Interference (Books 1 and 2).
A superior Eighth Doctor story.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback
With SEEING I, we bring to a close the three book DOCTOR WHO mini-series that began with THE LONGEST DAY (which was followed by a solo Doctor intermission in THE LEGACY OF THE DALEKS), and followed by DREAMSTONE MOON - and up until now each story has tried to build on the one previous - but with little luck and even less entertainment. But with SEEING I we end on a high note which not only entertains, but also drops a few plot lines and problems with Sam that had dogged her since she first arrived on board the TRADIS. As for the story, it's a straight forward affair that will at once cause a few yawns, but at the same time open a few eyes (pun intended). The Doctor is still searching for Sam, and now having found her at the opening of the story, he is arrested and locked away for several years while we, the reader, pick up and follow Sam from girl to young woman as she lands without a friend on a distant planet, joins a environmental group, shakes up the place and battles a mega corporation - and all the while is allowed to grow up. I've never been a big fan of the Sam character. She was boring, annoying and her attraction to the Doctor was always a problem for me (and most writers tried to turn her into some kind of "sex object" for the Doctor to notice - see OPTION LOCK for the dreaded wet T-shirt scene), but here, finally, she allowed to grow up, acquire some skills (which she was seriously lacking in the previous novels - unless you consider screaming and running skills), and have a mind of her own. Like the rest of the series though, the fireworks are held back until the final third of the book and it's all rush, rush, rush from there until the last page, leaving the reader with abrupt conclusion to a story which was neither that exciting or surprising to begin with. SEEING I is not for first time readers, but for fans, it's one of the best and worth picking up.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback
This is the first of the "New" Dr. Who stories I have read, meaning the "original" stories that are not part of the series. I have got to say that it is one big soap-opra. Most of the scenes are with Sam on some Earth-like world doing Earth-like stuff. Booring. I read this about two years ago, so can only barely remember the scenes with Dr. Who. Most of the chapters are of Sam and her friends, or Sam and her new boyfriend blah! blah! blah! These books, all of them in my opinion, are like this. I don't know if it's the times(1999, 2000, 2001) or what but I guess people prefer soaps on another planet to adventure on another planet like the series. That is why these books have sold. That is why sci-fi shows today are so mushy(eg. Farscape, Star Trek, probably "Enterprise" released this fall, and Dr. Who if it was remade for today's audience, I guess I'm an old codger at age 30, don't know... Hmm!)
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback
There was one moment while in SEEING I where I cheered out loud. It was the passage in which Sam Jones (having run out on the Doctor in an earlier book) gets fed up with her boring, routine, desk-bound, nine-to-five job and quits to try to make a life for herself that means something. And this portion demonstrates the strength of this book. No longer is Sam merely Generic Companion #1, but a thinking, living, human character who's forced to deal with life after her first series of travels in the TARDIS.
The Doctor is well characterized here, but that isn't surprising as Kate Orman and Jon Blum are the team that gave us the first real characterization of the post-TV-Movie Eighth Doctor. There are a few places where his extreme touch-feeliness may feel a bit shallow and false, but there is something positive to be said about a Doctor who goes bungee jumping in between adventures. The plot is fairly thin and serves mostly to explore the two main characters, Sam and the Eighth Doctor, and their relationship -- something that had not been done as well or as in-depth in this BBC range it had been in some of the Doctor/companion teams of the Virgin-era books. This is something that the series was very much in need of -- in prior books, the Doctor and Sam had become almost faceless, with Paul McGann's one-time portrayal of the Doctor being reduced into small basic mannerisms that captured none of the charm and enthusiasm that had been brought to the role. SEEING I did a wonderful job of giving the Doctor more character than simply repeating his friends' a (not inconsiderable) number of times before addressing them.
All in all, this is an excellent return to form.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Product Images from Customers

Most recent customer reviews

Search


Feedback