Start reading Self-Liberation through Seeing with Naked Awareness on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Anybody can read Kindle bookseven without a Kindle devicewith the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets, and computers.
Self-Liberation through Seeing with Naked Awareness
 
See larger image
 

Self-Liberation through Seeing with Naked Awareness [Kindle Edition]

John Myrdhin Reynolds
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

Digital List Price: CDN$ 19.99 What's this?
Print List Price: CDN$ 18.95
Kindle Price: CDN$ 9.99 includes free international wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
You Save: CDN$ 8.96 (47%)

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition CDN $9.99  
Hardcover --  
Paperback CDN $13.83  

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Description

Review

This text is perhaps the clearest, most comprehensive and accessible of medium-length writing on rigpa and as such is highly recommended. (Religious Studies Review)

This important work should be of interest to most Buddhist readers (Library Journal)

I very much enjoyed this incredible book that provides an in-depth view into Dzogchen. (New Age Retailer)

Product Description

The origins of this book come from the same cycle of teachings as The Tibetan Book of the Dead. Written by Padmasambhava, who helped to establish Buddhism in Tibet, the text was rediscovered centuries later and has been widely taught as an oral commentary since then. Giving instruction on the method of self-liberation, it presents the essence of Dzogchen. As this is regarded as one of the most advanced and esoteric teachings of the Buddha, practitioners seek out helpful commentary to guide them through the material. Self-Liberation through Seeing with Naked Awareness does just this - presenting this traditionally advanced teaching in such a way to make it accessible for Western students.

Product Details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1223 KB
  • Print Length: 196 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1559391448
  • Publisher: Snow Lion Publications; 2nd Edition edition (Oct. 1 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1559393521
  • ISBN-13: 978-1559393522
  • ASIN: B0062ZBHIQ
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #208,010 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Ian Myles Slater on: Identifying the Text Oct. 9 2003
Format:Paperback
Prospective readers of this work may wish to know that it has a descriptive subtitle -- "An Introduction to the Nature of One's Own Mind from *The Profound Teaching of Self-Liberation in the Primordial State of the Peaceful and Wrathful Deities* A terma text of Guru Padmasambhava expounding the view of Dzogchen, rediscovered by Rigdzin Karma Lingpa." In other words, it offers itself as a "postponed revelation," a terma (treasure) re-discovered and offered to the world centuries after its composition. As such it is part of a large class of Tibetan Buddhist works.
The text had previously been translated into English at the instigation of W.Y. Evans-Wentz, who published that version in "The Tibetan Book of the Great Liberation" which appeared in 1954 as the last of four volumes in the "Oxford Tibetan Series." It there followed an abridged translation of one of the traditional biographies of Padmasambhava, the legendary "Apostle to the Tibetans," and one of their patron Bodhisattvas, who is regarded as the author of this and other works. These texts were surrounded by commentaries by Evans-Wentz and C.G. Jung. The latter is probably important for students of Jung. Evans-Wentz's contributions generally reflect a lack of information about esoteric Buddhism, and a tendency to substitute material from Hindu and Theosophical sources.
Having compared the present translation (pages 9-28) with that offered by Evans-Wentz, I can say that it appears to be superior in clarity. Given the present, far more advanced state of Tibetan studies, it is certainly more likely to be accurate than the ad-hoc attempt provided by Evans-Wentz's translators. Additional features include the Tibetan text in transliteration, a glossary of Tibetan Buddhist terms, and an extended commentary.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
Format:Paperback
The only thing to add would be that this is a new addition of previously published "Self-Liberation: Through Seeing with Naked Awareness". The work itself is a terma(treasure teaching) of Guru Padmasambhava discovered by master Karma Lingpa. Personally, I found this book of a great value for the reason of a very lucid INSTRUCTION rather than just theory, which is sufficiently expounded, too. It gives a clear explanation as to why and how the principle of a spiritual teaching can be misunderstood and points out directly on the right method of application of this knowledge. I would recommend this book to everybody!
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Terton Karma Lingpa Jan. 23 2001
Format:Paperback
Terton Karma Lingpa is a highly respected authority in the Dzogchen Tradition. A present-day practitioner can not but appreciate the classics...
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars  17 reviews
46 of 49 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Self-Liberation: Through Seeing with Naked Awareness Jan. 23 2001
By Svyatoslav Uvarov - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
The only thing to add would be that this is a new addition of previously published "Self-Liberation: Through Seeing with Naked Awareness". The work itself is a terma(treasure teaching) of Guru Padmasambhava discovered by master Karma Lingpa. Personally, I found this book of a great value for the reason of a very lucid INSTRUCTION rather than just theory, which is sufficiently expounded, too. It gives a clear explanation as to why and how the principle of a spiritual teaching can be misunderstood and points out directly on the right method of application of this knowledge. I would recommend this book to everybody!
37 of 40 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ian Myles Slater on: Identifying the Text Oct. 9 2003
By Ian M. Slater - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Prospective readers of this work may wish to know that it has a descriptive subtitle -- "An Introduction to the Nature of One's Own Mind from *The Profound Teaching of Self-Liberation in the Primordial State of the Peaceful and Wrathful Deities* A terma text of Guru Padmasambhava expounding the view of Dzogchen, rediscovered by Rigdzin Karma Lingpa." In other words, it offers itself as a "postponed revelation," a terma (treasure) re-discovered and offered to the world centuries after its composition. As such it is part of a large class of Tibetan Buddhist works.

The text had previously been translated into English at the instigation of W.Y. Evans-Wentz, who published that version in "The Tibetan Book of the Great Liberation" which appeared in 1954 as the last of four volumes in the pioneering "Oxford Tibetan Series," which had begun in 1927 with another terma text, the "Tibetan Book of the Dead."

The "Self-Liberation" treatise there followed an abridged translation of one of the traditional biographies of Padmasambhava, the legendary "Apostle to the Tibetans," and one of their patron Bodhisattvas, who is regarded as the real author of this and other works. These texts were surrounded by commentaries by Evans-Wentz and C.G. Jung. The latter is probably important for students of Jung. Evans-Wentz's contributions generally reflect a lack of information about esoteric Buddhism, and a tendency to substitute material from Hindu and Theosophical sources.

Having compared the present translation (pages 9-28) with that offered by Evans-Wentz, I can say that it appears to be superior in clarity. Given the present, far more advanced state of Tibetan studies, it is certainly more likely to be accurate than the ad-hoc attempt provided by Evans-Wentz's translators. Additional features include the Tibetan text in transliteration, a glossary of Tibetan Buddhist terms, and an extended commentary. This is undoubtedly an advance on Evans-Wentz, although its devotional tone may seem cloying to some readers (including this one)

There are also extended discussions of the Evans-Wentz and Jung interpretations. The dismissal of Jung is particularly interesting; although I don't much care for Jung myself, I felt that he was not being given sufficient credit for trying to take Asian traditions as seriously as he took those closer to home. (Of course, given Jung's reductionist approach to religion, this may amount to 0 = 0.)
22 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An answer for the restless mind Feb. 2 2002
By Jeff Orrok - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I discovered that upon reading this text, a part of my mind which was always seeking to understand this life had finally been satisfied! I do not consider myself a practicioner of buddhism, much less an expert, and yet what it had to say was clear and persuasive.(...)
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book transformed my life Sept. 13 2011
By Leon Gutierrez - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
After a year from reading this book I can honestly say that this book invited me to become a Buddhist. Even thought it is not an easy read, it is very direct, practical and profound. I had to read some sections several times to feel I understood.
Before reading this book, I didn't know anything about this philosophy or Guru Rinpoche. For me, this book was a life changing point. Beautiful "terma"
Thank you Mahasiddha Padmasambhava
11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars For me, one of the better Dzogchen texts... Feb. 3 2005
By calmly - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
John Reynolds (aka Vajranatha) exposed me to Dzogchen thru this book. He associated himself with Namkai Norbu (who wrote the foreword) and had the assistance for this translation on others who know Dzogchen, including Lama Tharchin who I had the great fortune to hear speak once.

If Dzogchen can be applied successfully, then it must be through reading books like this one that one "reaches" that understanding.

When I was new to Dzogchen, Vayranathra's commentary was helpful. It remains so, but to a lesser degree today, but that may be due to overfamiliarity with it on my part. The appendix, which discusses how Evan-Wentz and Jung viewed Dzogchen, was never very helpful to me and I am not clear that it would benefit anyone but scholars. My assumption is to ignore Evan-Wentz translation and go with Vayrarathra's, since it was the first I encountered, it was supported by some Dzogchen teachers, and it excited me about Dzogchen.

Since that time, having read "You aee the Eyes of the World" from Longchenpa, Self-Liberation is no longer my "favorite" Dzogchen text but it continues to seem to be one of the three most important I know of, these two and the other one being the Bon text "Heart Drops of the Dharmakaya". I confess that my practical understanding of these texts remains small after about 10 years of studying Dzogchen on and off, but it does seem to me to remain one of the more important possible ways of facing the world constructively.

Vajranathana has continued his studies of Dzogchen (both in Tibetan Buddhism and Bon) and remained closely associated with

Namkai Norbu. My impression is that he is one of the most, if not the most, reputable scholar/translator of Dzogchen. His other translations include "The Golden Letters" and "The Cycle of Day and Night". I'd suggest reading "You are the eyes of the world" postponing the introduction and commentary but rather reading first the main text of "Self-liberation through seeing with naked awareness", also postponing its commentary and seeing what effect they have on you. If they make sense, you may be on your way to being benefited by Dzogchen in a way you could never have anticipated either yourself or by what modern day writers try to tell you. My bias is to trust the modern translators and ancient text writers for the time being and see where that leads me, because the translators may be constrained by the ancient texts and the ancient text writers may be had less to gain in worldly ways then some modern teachers.

Well, that's just my two cents on how I have approached Dzogchen. It isn't certain to me yet that anyone at any time has really applied these teachings constructively: it may be a well-meaning comfort system and it may be a long-lived deception. That it means something to indicate I am conscious in a way that seems incredibly creative, without boundaries, and with staggering presence I won't argue with, but that may be natural aspects of what we find as our consciousness and being in the world, it doesn't mean that anyone is a master of it or that it is some great perfection that already exists but for which I should pay people to confirm. Be wary and enjoy this creative ride and be glad, as "Self-Liberation through seeing with naked awareness" points out that your present thoughts will liberate of their own accord and not clutter your mind for too long.
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Look for similar items by category