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Septuagint With Apocrypha: GREEK AND ENGLISH Hardcover – Jul 2009


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Septuagint With Apocrypha: GREEK AND ENGLISH + A New English Translation of the Septuagint
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 1408 pages
  • Publisher: Hendrickson (July 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0913573442
  • ISBN-13: 978-0913573440
  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 16.5 x 24.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #112,707 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Turimas Scott on Sept. 18 2000
Format: Hardcover
Having several members of my family involved with the Jehovah's Witnesses, and having had many religious discussions with them, I recognize your comments as those of a member of the Watchtower Society.
I would like to point out the double standard you manifest in your comments. With regard to Brenton translating the tetragram (YHWH) as "the Lord", you said:
---- "Brenton, as a translator, should have acknowledged the seriousness of producing a Bible translation, translating Hebrew into Greek with utmost dignity and respect..." ----
and:
---- "Displaying a religiously biased style, it is evident that Brenton had no intention of making the true thoughts and ideas that the scriptures were meant to convey available for the reader." ----
I wish to draw your attention to the fact that the Watchtower Society, in their own 'New World Translation' bible, inserted the name "Jehovah" into the inspired New Testament text 237 times when in fact it is not found even once in any Greek NT manuscript available today.
By altering the original reading of the Greek text, did the Watchtower Society translate "with utmost dignity and respect"? They did not.
In fact, they demonstrated a "religiously biased style".
It is also evident that they "had no intention of making the true thoughts and ideas that the scriptures were meant to convey available for the reader".
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Canicus on Aug. 26 2002
Format: Hardcover
This book presents the Septuagint (LXX) in parallel columns of Greek and an English translation. If you cannot read Greek, then the English translation is available for you to use. If you can read Greek, then the English is available to help clarify things when the torturous LXX Greek seems overwhelming.
The New Testament authors largely used the LXX whenever they quoted the Old Testament, and it sometimes differs from our Hebrew text. It seeded the theological language of the early church and the New Testament in a more fundamental way than even the King James Bible has for the English speaking theology of today.
To fully understand the New Testament, we must familiarize ourselves with the LXX. For example, the NT authors primarily used two words for the Church, "ecclesia" and "synagoge." These words were used almost exclusively in the OT for Israel. The NT authors' usage of these words can only mean that the Church and Israel are the same in their minds. I am an evangelical, but this fact challenges fundamentally some of the dominant teachings of our churches. Without the LXX, I would not have understood much NT doctrine. This includes far more than beliefs about the Church. Work through it and discover the others for yourself.
That said, this book suffers from some fatal flaws. First, it divides the Apocryphal books from the rest of the books, and it does so with the Apocryphal portions of accepted OT books. The early Church did not look at them this way. While the Apocryphal portions of Daniel do not exist in our modern Protestant Bibles, most of the early Church read them without any indication that they were different. The division is artificial and changes the reading for us and polluting our studies in the LXX.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Rivera on Sept. 22 2002
Format: Hardcover
Javan was the forefather of the Greeks, just as Shem is the ancestor of the Semitic peoples, among these the Jews. This work, begun in 275 B.C. by a group of seventy rabbis, represents the union of two cultures that forever changed history. The Work of the Seventy, or THE SEPTUAGINT, is a watershed in Jewish history and critical in the formation of the Christian Church.
The Septuagint allowed those with little or no knowledge of the Hebrew language or Judaic culture to read the prophecies and history that form the foundation of the Christian message, allowing its spread throughout the empire. In addition, much study has shown that the authors of the New Testament either allude to or quote directly from the Septuagint -a survey look at St. Paul's epistles will confirm this. Furthermore, Christian apologists since the Apostolic Fathers have used the Septuagint in defense of the Christian faith, such as Isaiah 7:14 on the Virgin Birth, where the Hebrew word "almah" -which means "maiden" or "virgin"- is translated into greek as "parthenon" which means "virgin" almost exclusively. (In fact, the Old Testament uses both "maiden" and "virgin" interchangeably, not always referring to a woman who has not had relations; this is a subject of continuing debate). As such, the Septuagint has played a critical part in the history and development of the Church and its theology (it is the Bible used by the Orthodox Church to this day).
This edition of the Septuagint is among the best currently available, providing the Greek text alongside the 1851 English translation. This is NOT an interlinear; there is no English under the Greek sentences. The binding is beautiful and strong, capable of withstanding one's constant use (hopefully you'll use it avidly!).
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Jan. 9 2003
Format: Hardcover
Sir Lancelot Brenton's edition of the LXX is based upon a single source, codex Vaticanus, with some variants from codex Alexandrinus mentioned in the footnotes, but not affecting, I believe, the translation, except in a few cases where the Vaticanus manuscript was mutilated and Alexandrinus provided the next best text (and these cases are enumerated in an appendix).
Likewise, Rahlfs' edition (Septuaginta, ISBN: 3438051214) is also based upon Codex Vaticanus, but textual variants found in codex Alexandrinus and codex Sinaiticus are adopted in preference to those in codex Vaticanus based upon Rahlfs' critical opinion. He is using standard text critical methodology to judge which are more likely representative of the "Old Greek" version used by the majority of Jews...
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