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Seventh Inning Stretch Hardcover – May 22 2002


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Fitzhenry & Whiteside (May 22 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0802733743
  • ISBN-13: 978-0802733740
  • Product Dimensions: 21.9 x 14.5 x 2.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 404 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

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By Donald Mitchell #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Aug. 2 2003
Format: Hardcover
What happens when a small-town police force runs up against a series of bizarre events? Science will out, if they understand their police procedures. In Seventh-Inning Stretch, you have two deaths that occur under gruesome and unimaginable circumstances. Finding out what brought it all on will leave you intrigued.
Jake Hines has recently become chief of detectives in Rutherford, Minnesota, and he's finding it hard to supervise rather than taking charge. In the process, he bends everyone a little out of shape and begins to back off . . . just a little.
As the book opens, things are looking up. There's been a temporary lull in serious crimes. So he directs everyone to work on cold cases. He even has time to hear about a series of Murphy and other con games being run by grifters in the small town and its environs. New offices are being constructed and the new furniture is being delivered.
At home, he's settling into the old farmhouse that Trudy Hansen and he have bought together. His only complaint is that her long hours of DNA training on Saturdays leave them with too little time together. He's slightly concerned about how to get the roof fixed, insulation put in and rewiring done . . . but that's what credit cards are for, isn't it? Trudy's not so sure.
Then, everything turns topsy-turvy when a body is found stuffed into a trash bin behind the Lotus Blossom restaurant downtown. But no one saw or heard anything. And what's that stuffed into the stiff's mouth?
Nothing turns out to be what it seems in this exciting story, but with careful research and thinking everything is pretty well sorted out.
I would have rated this book higher, but the modus operandi of the murder was exceedingly gruesome and disgusting.
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By jane austen on Oct. 31 2002
Format: Hardcover
What can I say? I just really love this series. I found Jake quite by accident on a bargain table and took a chance. This was really serendipity. I promptly bought all that were written and have kept up ever since. I am eagerly awaiting # 8 as I have gotten involved with these characters. MEMLINE
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Format: Hardcover
Jake Hines is a captain and the chief of Detectives in the Rutherford Police Department who loves his job only slightly less than he loves his significant other, Trudy Hanson. They live in a farmhouse that needs a lot of work but Jake isn't worried about such trivial thing since he finally has what he always wanted since being a foster child: a place to call home.

A group of grifters consisting of two men, two women and a child descend upon the citizens and merchants of Rutherford, conning them out of their hard-earned money. When two bodies are found in a home garbage can, the police believe that the two male drifters are involved in the crime. Jake and his teams try to solve a double homicide with very little evidence and no leads.

This is the fifth Jake Hines police procedural and it is definitely the best in the series. The police, a tight knit group, are truly baffled by the strange turns in the case and their collective and individual bewilderment humanizes the force. This allows the readers to empathize with and appreciate the hard, often unrewarding work cops do. The hero is a rarity as an person totally happy in his personal and professional life. Elizabeth Ginn continues to deliver an ingenious mystery.

Harriet Klausner
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 6 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Great series! Oct. 30 2002
By jane austen - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
What can I say? I just really love this series. I found Jake quite by accident on a bargain table and took a chance. This was really serendipity. I promptly bought all that were written and have kept up ever since. I am eagerly awaiting # 8 as I have gotten involved with these characters. MEMLINE
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Misdirection! Aug. 2 2003
By Donald Mitchell - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
What happens when a small-town police force runs up against a series of bizarre events? Science will out, if they understand their police procedures. In Seventh-Inning Stretch, you have two deaths that occur under gruesome and unimaginable circumstances. Finding out what brought it all on will leave you intrigued.
Jake Hines has recently become chief of detectives in Rutherford, Minnesota, and he's finding it hard to supervise rather than taking charge. In the process, he bends everyone a little out of shape and begins to back off . . . just a little.
As the book opens, things are looking up. There's been a temporary lull in serious crimes. So he directs everyone to work on cold cases. He even has time to hear about a series of Murphy and other con games being run by grifters in the small town and its environs. New offices are being constructed and the new furniture is being delivered.
At home, he's settling into the old farmhouse that Trudy Hansen and he have bought together. His only complaint is that her long hours of DNA training on Saturdays leave them with too little time together. He's slightly concerned about how to get the roof fixed, insulation put in and rewiring done . . . but that's what credit cards are for, isn't it? Trudy's not so sure.
Then, everything turns topsy-turvy when a body is found stuffed into a trash bin behind the Lotus Blossom restaurant downtown. But no one saw or heard anything. And what's that stuffed into the stiff's mouth?
Nothing turns out to be what it seems in this exciting story, but with careful research and thinking everything is pretty well sorted out.
I would have rated this book higher, but the modus operandi of the murder was exceedingly gruesome and disgusting. The story would have worked better for me with a more tasteful demise. If you have delicate tastes in your crime fiction, this book may not appeal to you.
After you finish this fine police procedural, think about where you may be assuming that things are one way . . . when they are actually quite different. How can you test your assumptions before you act on them?
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
strong police procedural June 8 2002
By Harriet Klausner - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Jake Hines is a captain and the chief of Detectives in the Rutherford Police Department who loves his job only slightly less than he loves his significant other, Trudy Hanson. They live in a farmhouse that needs a lot of work but Jake isn't worried about such trivial thing since he finally has what he always wanted since being a foster child: a place to call home.

A group of grifters consisting of two men, two women and a child descend upon the citizens and merchants of Rutherford, conning them out of their hard-earned money. When two bodies are found in a home garbage can, the police believe that the two male drifters are involved in the crime. Jake and his teams try to solve a double homicide with very little evidence and no leads.

This is the fifth Jake Hines police procedural and it is definitely the best in the series. The police, a tight knit group, are truly baffled by the strange turns in the case and their collective and individual bewilderment humanizes the force. This allows the readers to empathize with and appreciate the hard, often unrewarding work cops do. The hero is a rarity as an person totally happy in his personal and professional life. Elizabeth Ginn continues to deliver an ingenious mystery.

Harriet Klausner
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Perfect story, perfect length Aug. 11 2005
By J. Rosenberg - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This is a great series. The characters are complex, their interactions and dialogue realistic within the context of a police procedural. Jake Hines' police work and his life with Trudy are an excellent combination. And, best of all, the author has not felt it necessary to stuff her story full of extraneous material in order to produce a 300-page book when a 200-page book does the job.
Smart mouth detective May 8 2014
By N. Turner - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I love the Jake Hines series to the point that I'm gradually replacing my paperbacks with hardbacks, and of course rereading them as I do. Jake, his lady Trudy, and their friends and coworkers (cops, forensic technicians, coroners and farmers) are a funny bunch, even when caught up in truly serious crime solving.

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