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Shape of Further Things [Paperback]

Brian W. Aldiss
3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

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Book Description

May 24 1974
'Haven't you ever thought to yourself after a pleasant evening - or even after a dull afternoon - that if you could but have it all again, preferably in slow motion, then you could trace in it all the varied strands of your life?' In "The Shape of Further Things", originally published by Faber in 1970, Brian Aldiss presents an autobiographical work that explores both past and future. An intriguing book that explores a wide range of topics, offering a memorable perspective on the developing thoughts of a Science Fiction writer and a critique of the function of Science Fiction in society.

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About the Author

Brian Aldiss, born in 1925, is one of the most prolific authors of both general and science fiction. In a writing career stretching from 1955 to the present he has published over seventy books. He has also been an influential compiler of science fiction anthologies. A Science Fiction Omnibus is available as a Penguin Modern Classic. Faber have reissued six of his best science fiction titles: Earthworks, Cryptozoic!, Barefoot in the Head, Galaxies like Grains of Sand, The Dark Light Years and The Shape of Further Things.

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3.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating Sept. 18 2002
Format:Paperback
This is non-fiction from Aldiss, not really on any particular subject, or arranged with any goal in mind, but a conversation between himself and the reader, importuned by a January 1969 night's conversation between himself and Christopher Evans. If I may not be too bold, it's much the same as what I imagine First Impressions to be, although Aldiss has me soundly beat in terms of far-ranging intellectual discourse. We all have to start somewhere, though.
Although in some ways this book is trapped in the time at which it was written, it also overcomes such by realizing that it would be. The title, of course, refers back to H.G. Wells' Shape of Things to Come (or, at least I think that's right). Aldiss tries to live up to that earlier volume by playing the prophet as well. And, like most prophecies when looked back on with hindsight, it's interesting to note the things that didn't come to pass more than what he's gotten right. This is also a biographical and historical document as it relates the rise of SF in Britain, as well as describing some of the inner workings of the New Wave. Thanks to Paul di Filippo for sending this book to me (a perfect way to make sure I read your recommendation!).
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Amazon.com: 3.0 out of 5 stars  1 review
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating Sept. 18 2002
By Glen Engel Cox - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This is non-fiction from Aldiss, not really on any particular subject, or arranged with any goal in mind, but a conversation between himself and the reader, importuned by a January 1969 night's conversation between himself and Christopher Evans. If I may not be too bold, it's much the same as what I imagine First Impressions to be, although Aldiss has me soundly beat in terms of far-ranging intellectual discourse. We all have to start somewhere, though.
Although in some ways this book is trapped in the time at which it was written, it also overcomes such by realizing that it would be. The title, of course, refers back to H.G. Wells' Shape of Things to Come (or, at least I think that's right). Aldiss tries to live up to that earlier volume by playing the prophet as well. And, like most prophecies when looked back on with hindsight, it's interesting to note the things that didn't come to pass more than what he's gotten right. This is also a biographical and historical document as it relates the rise of SF in Britain, as well as describing some of the inner workings of the New Wave. Thanks to Paul di Filippo for sending this book to me (a perfect way to make sure I read your recommendation!).
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