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Sheba: Through the Desert in Search of the Legendary Queen Hardcover – Apr 24 2001


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; None edition (April 24 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0395952832
  • ISBN-13: 978-0395952832
  • Product Dimensions: 21.8 x 14.9 x 3.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 649 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,428,734 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Aaron Neptune on April 5 2003
Format: Paperback
Nicholas Clapp may be better known for his remarkable discovery of the so-called "lost city" of Ubar in the 90's. What makes his discovery all the more remarkable, and entertaining, is that Clapp is a documentary filmmaker... not an archaeologist. Of course, one could say that a documentary filmmaker is something of a jack of all trades, a good description of Clapp, it seems, as he brought together a team of NASA scientists, a British adventurer in the Lawrence of Arabia vein, and his parole officer wife, among others, on an adventure he created from some serious, in-depth study of ancient texts and maps.
Clapp's Sheba takes place in a similar area, and again deals with the murky mists that cover mankind's ancient past, and with the myths and legends that may, or may not, be based on fact. However, Sheba is notably different than "The Road to Ubar" in that his quest this time involves a person and not a place. Unfortunately, places last quite a bit longer than flesh-and-blooders like ourselves, and Sheba should be approached differently than Ubar-- if you've read it-- because here there will not be that "aha!" moment when the seeming lump of sand gives up its treasure.
Clapp's quest for Sheba offers the tantalizing prospect of such "aha!" moments when and if Yemen becomes a safe place for large, organized archaeological digs. A vast, ancient city of 20,000 people awaits that intrepid Indiana Jones.
Now, having said that, Clapp shows more of his wonderful storytelling ability, and his historical detective work, looking for the weave of fact amongst the warp of time.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. Meegan on June 27 2002
Format: Paperback
Nicholas Clapp's search for the Queen of Sheba is one of the best non-fiction books I've read this year. The book is a travelogue, history, biblical study, analysis of Arabic mythology, and view of Middle Eastern and Eastern African politics all wrapped into one. Clapp is an engaging writer with a dry and subtle sense of humor that had me laughing out loud as I followed him on his often whimsical quest through Israel, Yemen, and Ethiopia. His frank, honest style and his ability to poke fun at and not take himself too seriously made the book and absolute pleasure to read. Like most books that focus on the world's great "unsolved mysteries," Clapp's journey often raises more questions than it answers. But that only added to my enjoyment of the story. When I finished the book, it felt as if I'd come to the end of a long stay with a good friend.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Eric Lyon on March 15 2002
Format: Hardcover
From the acheologist and author behind the superlative Road to Ubar comes this years-long search for the titular queen. Clapp knows that behind many a legend looms a historical figure. In contrast to his search for Ubar, however, Clapp seems a bit too willing to believe the most tenuous of connections when seeking Sheba's stomping grounds. As his ability to wander through possible sites becomes increasingly restricted (due to political unrest), his healthy critical outlook appears to take a back seat to his need for an expedient resolution. Clapp himself seems as likeable as ever, though, and many of his observations (especially those made while in Yemen) are as hilarious as they are insightful.
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