Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
or
Amazon Prime Free Trial required. Sign up when you check out. Learn More
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Tell the Publisher!
I'd like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Sherlock Holmes and the Rune Stone Mystery [Paperback]

Larry Millett
2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
List Price: CDN$ 16.69
Price: CDN$ 11.51 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
You Save: CDN$ 5.18 (31%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
Want it delivered Wednesday, October 22? Choose One-Day Shipping at checkout.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover --  
Paperback CDN $11.51  
Join Amazon Student in Canada


Book Description

March 1 2012 Fesler-Lampert Minnesota Heritage

Sherlock Holmes is bored between cases at 221B Baker Street. So when King Oskar II of Sweden—who has heard of the discovery of the Kensington Rune Stone by a farmer in Minnesota—asks to engage his services, Holmes jumps at the chance to decipher the runes and determine whether the find is real or a hoax. With Dr. John H. Watson by his side, faithfully recording every detail, Holmes makes his way to Minnesota for a third time. But, in the first of many strange and unfortunate coincidences, the farmer who found the mysterious stone is murdered, and the stone itself is stolen on the day the famous detective arrives.

With the help of one Shadwell Rafferty, now a friend and partner, Holmes must solve this baffling case to find both the stone and the murderer.


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details


Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

For the third time (after, most recently, Sherlock Holmes and the Ice Palace Murders), Holmes and Watson make their way to Minnesota and team up with savvy St. Paul saloonkeeper and sometime detective Shadwell Rafferty. The year is 1899, and reports of the discovery of an ancient stone telling of Viking explorers coming to what is now Minnesota has caused an international stir. Sweden's King Oskar II wants the stone back in his country if it is genuine. As fate would have it, on the very day Holmes and Watson arrive, the farmer who uncovered the stone is murdered, "his skull split down the middle like a ripe watermelon," and the stone taken. The friendly rivalry between Rafferty and Holmes has evolved into almost a partnership. Millett handles Holmes and Watson well and is definitely in his comfort zone with Rafferty, a thoroughly engaging character. It doesn't matter if Holmes ever really came to Minnesota or if the Rune stone was genuine or fake. The way Millett tells the tale, readers will be happy to take his word for it. (Oct.)
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From School Library Journal

YA-Once again, Millett accurately re-creates the famous detective and his associate, Dr. John H. Watson, who narrates this fine mystery that's full of suspense, adventure, and colorful characters. Based on a true incident involving a stone with runic writing that was found in Minnesota in 1898, this story utilizes the same time and place. The story begins in London as King Oskar II of Sweden persuades Sherlock Holmes to investigate the authenticity of a Viking stone carving found on a western Minnesota farm. Holmes and Watson arrive in the states just as the farmer who made the discovery is killed and the stone is stolen. Many strange coincidences and a surprising villain complicate the case. The writing and plot are very much like Arthur Conan Doyle's stories, and fans will enjoy seeing the sleuths working together.
Linda A. Vretos, Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, Alexandria, VA
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
First Sentence
"Coincidence, Sherlock Holmes once remarked to me, is the tribute reason must occasionally pay to fate." Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

Customer Reviews

2.5 out of 5 stars
2.5 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
I have to say I was quite disappointed with this book. I have been an avid Sherlockian for several years now, and having exhausted the original Conan Doyle stories many times over, I decided about a month ago to pick up this book. I didn't expect too much, but seeing as I had heard so many wonderful things about Larry Millett, I decided to give it a try.
First of all, this is NOT a Sherlock Holmes mystery. You can approach it in any way you like, but it will never be a Sherlock Holmes mystery. It is simply a mystery with Sherlock Holmes in it. And this Sherlock Holmes is certainly not the one I know. He is constantly and repeatedly surprised by evidence and information supplied to him by one Shadwell Rafferty, and Irish-American with an annoying habit of saying "'tis" and "'twould" in every sentence possible. Let me repeat that: Sherlock Holmes is SURPRISED. He is effectly put off his guard. As many Sherlock fans will note, this is a virtual impossibility. Sherlock Holmes is always ready for everything, and, more importantly, always suspects everything. He is never surprised. I immediately began to re-evaluate this story when I had found this out and here's what I decided:
This book is a mystery, and a rather good one at that. But you should not buy it if you are looking for Sherlock Holmes. Not only is the great detective fairly scarce throughout the book but he is greviously mis-represented. It is even suggested that he is in love! The absurdity is truly odd. However, if you give Sherlock Holmes any other name -- say, Terrance Jones, or John Smith, or Timothy Hillington, or just about any other name on the face of the Earth -- the mystery becomes quite interesting, sinister and highly entertaining.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
1.0 out of 5 stars Very Disappointing July 12 2001
Format:Paperback
I've been a Sherlock Holmes fan all my life. I have read all four of the Conan Doyle novels and most of the short stories. I've read numerous Holmes stories and novels by other writers and seen every Holmes film that I have come across. I was predisposed to like "Sherlock Holmes and the Rune Stone Mystery". However, all I can say is that it was a major disappointment.
First of all, let's be clear. Millett can call his main character Sherlock Holmes just as I can call myself the King of France, but saying, or writing, it doesn't make it so. Instead, we have some English imposter who doesn't even have the courage to use the Holmes name most of the time, let alone the Holmes intellect or his flair for observation and deduction. Millett would have been better off to have centered the novel around his own detective creation, Shadwell Rafferty, at least he seems to be who he says he is. Better yet, he should have built the book around his only interesting character, (alleged) villainous, Mary Comstock.
This is a story built, according to its narrator, the Pseudo-Dr. Watson, on coincidences. We all know what coincidences are. They are the last refuge of hack writers. If you don't know how to resolve a problem, have the solution fall conveniently into someone's lap. It's a lot easier than being creative.
Then there is the location of the book. We are asked to believe that Holmes would travel all the way to Minnesota by boat and train on some trivial mission for the King of Sweden. Since the King already has an agent there, this seems far-fetched. Now, I have nothing against stories set in Minnesota being a fan of John Sandford's Prey novels, but this is the third time that Millett has had Holmes make that trek.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Depends on reader's style.... June 2 2004
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
Like all Sherlock Holmes books, there will be people who like an author and dislike an author. I personally greatly enjoyed this particular Sherlock Holmes series written by Larry Millet. The style of writing is very interesting and very simular to the other Holmes stories written by Millet. However, if you are expecting a book in the pictureque styles of Dr. Doyle and Dr. Bell you will be disappointed. Millet's Holmes stories are more to the tee of an Indiana Jones type than that of the Bell-Doyle Holmes character. If you prefer a Doyle Holmes over a Jones Holmes than I recommend Val Andrews or Barry Day over Larry Millet. However, if you prefer having Holmes as a secondary character in a Indiana Jones type book than you should enjoy the somewhat grotesque SHERLOCK HOLMES AND THE ICE PALACE MURDERS.
Was this review helpful to you?
1.0 out of 5 stars Not for a Sherlockian or a Holmesian Oct. 13 2003
Format:Paperback
I agree with the previous reviewer, and would have assigned this book a negative rating if it were allowed. If you are a true devotee of Sherlock Holmes, this is NOT the book for you. Millett may have knowledge of Canonical lore, but he has no understanding of the characters Sherlock Holmes or Dr. Watson, nor does Millett exhibit any understanding of the Victorian morals and principles that these two men would have been steeped in.
As for me: after reading only 6 chapters of this book, I gleefully used it as tinder in my fireplace. That should speak for itself.
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.3 out of 5 stars  17 reviews
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A mystery to be sure, but not a Sherlock Holmes mystery Aug. 2 2003
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I have to say I was quite disappointed with this book. I have been an avid Sherlockian for several years now, and having exhausted the original Conan Doyle stories many times over, I decided about a month ago to pick up this book. I didn't expect too much, but seeing as I had heard so many wonderful things about Larry Millett, I decided to give it a try.
First of all, this is NOT a Sherlock Holmes mystery. You can approach it in any way you like, but it will never be a Sherlock Holmes mystery. It is simply a mystery with Sherlock Holmes in it. And this Sherlock Holmes is certainly not the one I know. He is constantly and repeatedly surprised by evidence and information supplied to him by one Shadwell Rafferty, and Irish-American with an annoying habit of saying "'tis" and "'twould" in every sentence possible. Let me repeat that: Sherlock Holmes is SURPRISED. He is effectly put off his guard. As many Sherlock fans will note, this is a virtual impossibility. Sherlock Holmes is always ready for everything, and, more importantly, always suspects everything. He is never surprised. I immediately began to re-evaluate this story when I had found this out and here's what I decided:
This book is a mystery, and a rather good one at that. But you should not buy it if you are looking for Sherlock Holmes. Not only is the great detective fairly scarce throughout the book but he is greviously mis-represented. It is even suggested that he is in love! The absurdity is truly odd. However, if you give Sherlock Holmes any other name -- say, Terrance Jones, or John Smith, or Timothy Hillington, or just about any other name on the face of the Earth -- the mystery becomes quite interesting, sinister and highly entertaining.
Whether Larry Millett is using Sherlock Holmes's name to sell books, or whether he truly believes this book is a good representation of the detective, only Millett himself can say. But, from what I have read, Millett is devestatingly unfamiliar with Holmes's character, methods, and incredible genious, making this book less than so-so for Sherlock fans.
Also, although after a few chapters I was used to Minnesota being mentioned so often, at the beginning of reading this book, I chuckled to myself every time Millett wrote "Minnesota," "St. Paul," "Minneapolis," or "Fargo-Moorhead" which rather deteriorated the sinister feel of the mystery.
For those of you who are just looking for a good mystery, are unfamiliar with Sherlock Holmes, or are willing to disregard the fact that the English detective protrayed in this book is supposed to be Sherlock Holmes, than this book may be the one for it. It is very well written and quite interesting and deserves at least some merit for that...
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Favourite of Milletts 3 Holmes so far March 24 2000
By Brad Marchant - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
I've read all three of Milletts Sherlock in Minnesota and this one was my favourite so far. I enjoy the interface of the refined Victorian detective with the quarks and characters of Minnesota. His stories have become progressively more fun to read. I really enjoy the addition of Rafferty to our crime fighting team.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Written in the Doyle Style Jan. 17 2000
By Vizier - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
This is the third in the "Sherlock Holmes in Minnesota" saga and it follows the others in style and story. If you are a lover of the Holmes genre and gobble up what you can of the pastiches being offered by so many today, you are either gravely disappointed or surprisingly gratified. The story must capture the spirit of Holmes and Watson so brilliantly done by Doyle many years ago. The key to all such imitations is, of course, style of writing. Millett has suceeded in capturing Doyle's style. I find little fault in the way Watson or Holmes utter their dialogue. This is what makes me feel at home with a pastiche. It is the Holmes and Watson you recognize from the "canon". Millett has done his homework, has provided an acceptable story line and entertains us with this book.
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Just Plain Wrong (and I'm forgiving the setting) Dec 29 2004
By shawniemc - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
-a short list of errors-

1. Sherlock is dumb: The real Sherlock would have wrapped up this entire lame mystery without leaving Baker Street, as he did with many minor cases hardly worth mentioning by Watson. The reader often figures things out far in advance. As a previous reviewer stated, he was surprised by things that were in no way surprising! This is supposed to be the same fellow who correctly anticipated a bank robbery given a report about redheaded men copying the dictionary?

2. Sherlock, besides being dumb, is apparently new to detective work: Upon Watson and Holmes discovering a fresh murder there is a painful lack of Holmesian technique. The real Sherlock would have been down on all fours sniffing the carpet, inspecting the doorknob, fishing through the fireplace, and of course scooping up cigar ash. (Our author, in this vital moment, seems completely unaware that Sherlock Holmes is in fact a preexisting character--much less ever having read about him.) Before leaving the scene, Holmes should have rattled off numerous astounding conclusions to Watson for his notes. Instead, Holmes wonders away in a clueless fog--even saying something stupid to the effect of, 'I guess we'll never know'. (This is the point where I lost all hope, I kept reading only because the book was a gift--and it didn't take any brain power to read.)

3. Rafferty, the local contact, is not only way too competent, he's so smart that he emphasizes the Minnesota-Holmes's stupidity: This Rafferty genius could have easily solved this without Holmes and Watson getting in his way. Compare this to the likes of Lestrade and Gregson, who around those of normal intellect would appear quite bright, but around Holmes their conclusions are simple-minded. Rafferty though, is nearly infallible! I really don't know what the author was thinking in devising this character. Does he know the rules of character development taught in Creative Writing 101?

4. as stated by a previous reviewer...Coincidence?!: Not only does the author rely upon blind chance, he points it out for us before the book ever begins! Thanks Larry, for identifying yourself as a hack from the get-go! This is no longer just a bad pastiche, or a bad mystery, it's an example of very bad writing!

I'm sure I'll think of more later, after posting.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Third successful case in Minnesota for Holmes and Millett Oct. 28 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Some readers of Larry Millett's Sherlock Holmes in Minnesota series (Sherlock Holmes and the Red Demon, 1996 and Sherlock Holmes and the Ice Palace Murders, 1998) might be skeptical that events described in these books actually occurred. So it is fitting, and with a certain amount of irony, that Holmes' third case in Minnesota surrounds the discovery of a rune stone describing how Norse explorers came to what is now northwestern Minnesota in 1362. This is, of course a very thinly veiled Kensington Rune Stone "a highly disputed artifact since the day it was unearthed," says Millett in his afterword. Next to publishing Holmes's cases (they were written by Holmes' companion Dr. John Watson) Milllett, writer and editor at the St. Paul Pioneer Press) is best known for his books and articles on the architectural history of Minneapolis and St. Paul.
It is March 1899. Millett adeptly captures the familiar opening of many of Holmes' cases: a cozy scene in the sitting rooms of 221B Baker Street and Holmes lamenting the dearth of inspiring crime. Indeed Millett's Holmes has come to sound eerily like the Holmes of Conan Doyle: "I am a ship without a rudder adrift on an empty sea. The criminals of London, it would seem, have suffered a collective failure of the imagination, for which I must pay the price."
Fortuitously arriving on this scene is an agent for King Oskar II of Sweden. Upon hearing of the amazing discovery of a rune stone depicting Viking explorers in North America predating Christopher Columbus, Oskar decided that the stone should be brought to Sweden. At his behest Holmes is to find proof "that the stone itself cannot under any circumstances be a modern forgery." Though the prospect of another trip to Minnesota is "hardly pleasing" to Watson, he and Holmes agree to investigate.
As fate would have it, the farmer who discovered the stone is murdered, "his skull split down the middle like a ripe watermelon", and the stone stolen the very day Holmes and Watson arrive. By happy coincidence, (and as Holmes remarks, "Coincidence the tribute reason must occasionally pay to fate."), Shadwell Rafferty, barkeeper, sometime detective, and last seen in the Ice Palace Murders is also on the case. In that adventure, Rafferty and Holmes engage in a friendly rivalry. Here, they operate on equal footing, almost in partnership with a synergy that invigorates every scene in which they appear together.
Millett, over the course of these three novels has become more comfortable and more confident with Holmes, Watson and Rafferty who return as welcome friends. His plots, whether simple or elaborate, entertain and never fail to absorb. It is difficult to predict if additional accounts of Holmes' work in Minnesota will crop up, or if further of adventures of Shadwell Rafferty alone will be unearthed. Either or both should be greeted with enthusiasm by the multitude of Holmes fans, the gathering host of Rafferty fans, or anyone just looking for a well-wrought tale.
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Look for similar items by category


Feedback