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  • Sherlock Holmes in Washington / Sherlock Holmes Faces Death
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Sherlock Holmes in Washington / Sherlock Holmes Faces Death


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Product Details

  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: UNRATED
  • Studio: Phase 4
  • Release Date: Sept. 14 2010
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • ASIN: B003UAKECG
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #60,973 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Product Description

Sherlock Holmes Double Feature - Sherlock Holmes Faces Death & Sherlock Holmes in Washington

Sherlock Holmes Faces Death (1943) An intriguing mystery based upon Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's "The Musgrave Ritual." Dr. Watson, tending recuperating soldiers housed at centuries-old Musgrave Manor, summons Sherlock Holmes to investigate strange happenings. What follows is a bizarre series of events, including murders, secret passages, a game of chess and a mysterious family ritual. Even Inspector Lestrade is on hand, as well as lovely Hillary Brooke as Sally Musgrave. But only Sherlock Holmes, in a race against time and a desperate killer, can decipher the ancient riddle and uncover the treasure it hides.

Sherlock Holmes in Washington A British secret service operative, carrying top-secret microfilm from England to Washington, disappears while traveling to his destination. Fearing for his safety just before his disappearance, he passes the microfilm, ingeniously hidden, to another passenger on the train without her knowing. The agent is reported missing and Sherlock Holmes is called in to investigate.

Filmed during World War II, Sherlock Holmes In Washinton pits Holmes and Watson against Nazi enemy agents. The British government asks Holmes and Watson to go to Washington to recover the missing documents before they fall into the wrong hands, which would be disastrous for England and her allies. Holmes is up against an international ring of spies in a race against time to piece together the clues and discover the whereabouts of the microfilm before it is too late.

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Most helpful customer reviews

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Both movies are good quality transfers from the original media and I have always loved the original Sherlock Holmes series!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 42 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Classic Sherlock Holmes Films Oct. 24 2010
By Karen R. Haynes - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
It's nice that the Rathbone/Bruce Sherlock Holmes films are being remastered. These old films are good of their kind, but they were not in the best of shape. 'Sherlock Holmes Faces Death' is the better of the two films (it's based loosely on the story 'The Musgrave Ritual'). Any of the Sherlock Holmes films with Basil Rathbone & Nigel Bruce are worth watching. Although low budget (except the two made at Fox) they were well made & the acting can't be beat. The added commentary is also a plus. A must for the Sherlock Holmes fan.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Classic Holmes films from the Rathbone era Sept. 15 2014
By Graves - Published on Amazon.com
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Sherlock Holmes has been portrayed more time on stage, screen and TV than any other fictional character and in all that vast sea of Holmes, Basil Rathbone is the bar against which all others are measured. Cummerbatch, Brett, Cushing, Cook, Caine and all the rest cannot be viewed without comparing them to Rathbone-quieter than, more emotional than, crazier than, etc. he is the standard and here we have two examples.

In "Faces Death" (when doesn't he?) they take the names from the real Holmes short story, "the Musgrave Ritual" but the similarities end there. It's 1943 and Watson is serving as the medical officer in a hospital, really an old mansion, a crumbling, spooky edifice, for shell shocked soldiers. When one of the doctors is attacked one night Watson asks his friend to investigate and as bodies start to pile up in this classic who done it, the game is afoot!

"In Washington" is more of an adventure film. When a British courier disappears with an important document Holmes is charged with tracking it down. The man was last seen in a train compartment and as people who had been on that train start to get attacked it becomes obvious the courier passed the documents to someone on the train and a race is on to see if Holmes can get to the right person first.

As an interesting aside to this film it is copywrited in 1942, After the US had entered the war but it just refers to `an enemy' not Germany outright, it was probably written before pearl Harbor and was meant to drum up American support for the war. also of interest is a steward on the train Holmes talks to; a black man who proudly tells Holmes his son is in the army and going to be a pilot. We wouldn't think anything of this in 2014 but in 1942? This was an interesting statement by someone involved in the film about men fighting for their country.

Prior to these films Rathbone usually played the villain, a suave cultured villain, but the baddie none the less. At best he was the disinterested playboy, but after these films, he was Sherlock Holmes; the great brain without emotion who was several moves ahead of everyone else in the room, ably supported by Nigel Bruce as a bumbling Watson who could be counted on not only to trip over a clue, but provide unquestioning support for his friend through the very darkest mysteries. They did it so very well that any other actor before or since is held up to them for comparison. They set the bar, and they set it very high indeed.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
A must-have for aficionados! Sept. 2 2011
By Nancy Rice - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
This was a wonderful purchase. I am addicted to the Sherlock Holmes series with Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce. Thank heaven there are people who work to restore these classics and make them available on DVD. This was an exciting purchase, because I thought I had seen all the Rathbone movies, but these two were new to me! "Sherlock Holmes Faces Death" became an instant favorite, which I watched three times the first day. Keep bringing the classics on, please! A+ to this purchase.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Chronologically, My Dear Watson Oct. 22 2014
By Bowman - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
When a pre-existing series like this is released to DVD I often find it puzzling how they decide to package it. In this particular case a person potentially interested in viewing these films cannot tell from the Product Description what order they were originally released.

Obviously there are dates are microscopically printed at the lower back insert. But what would be so hard to sequentially number them in there proper chronological order. As is the case with everything I am sure there is some financial motive to their approach. These are the films and their original date of release:

The Hound of the Baskervilles - March 31, 1939
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - September 01, 1939 [1]
Sherlock Holmes and the Voice of Terror - September 18, 1942
Sherlock Holmes and the Secret Weapon - February 12, 1943 [2]
Sherlock Holmes in Washington - April 30 1943
Sherlock Holmes Faces Death - September 17, 1943
The Spider Woman - January 21, 1944
The Scarlet Claw - May 26, 1944
The Pearl of Death - September 22, 1944
Sherlock Holmes and the House of Fear - March 16, 1945
The Woman in Green - June 15, 1945 [2]
Pursuit to Algiers - October 26, 1945
Terror by Night - February 01, 1946 [2]
Dressed to Kill - June 07, 1946 [2]

[1] - These first two movies were produced by 20th Century Fox and set in their original Victorian era of the late 1800's. The remaining 12 movies were produced by Universal Studious and relocated to the then present day 1940's.

[2] - These 4 films are not available in this "Double Feature" release. In 2006 they became part of the public domain which allowed them to be digitally restored and computer colorized. They were then released as a 4-pack (ASIN: B00370I5VQ), and as much as I detest the desecration of B&W movies, they are actually pretty sharp viewing. I hope this helped.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Great stuff Dec 26 2010
By Kevin Holmes - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Excellent audio/video quality. Plots and actions only closely resemble the Sherlock Holmes adventures of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, but fun just the same.


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