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Shock Troops: Canadians Fighting the Great War 1917-1918 Paperback – Sep 29 2009


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Shock Troops: Canadians Fighting the Great War 1917-1918 + At the Sharp End: Canadians Fighting the Great War 1914-1916 + Madman And The Butcher, The
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 736 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Canada (Sept. 29 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0143055933
  • ISBN-13: 978-0143055938
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 5.1 x 22.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,721 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

TIM COOK is the Great War historian at the Canadian War Museum, as well as an adjunct professor at Carleton University. His books have won numerous awards, including the 2008 J.W. Dafoe Prize for At the Sharp End and the 2009 Charles Taylor Prize for Literary Non-Fiction for Shock Troops. In 2013, he received the Pierre Berton Award for popularizing Canadian history. He lives in Ottawa with his family.


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Customer Reviews

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By G. Poirier TOP 50 REVIEWER on Oct. 12 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
In this second instalment on his two-volume masterpiece on the Canadians (infantry) in World War I, the author picks up where he left off at the end of "At the Sharp End" (Volume one). Here, the horrors experienced by the soldiers on the Western Front continue to be recounted with just as much gory, heart-wrenching detail as in the first volume. However, in this case, the major battles in which the Canadian Corps undertook were resounding victories - although very costly ones. As before, the life of the trench warrior is the main focus, but the high command is also well covered. What I found particularly fascinating in this volume were the last few chapters in which the last hours and minutes of the war are discussed, as well as the events after the armistice: the soldiers' feelings at not being sent home immediately and the way they expressed their discontent, the eventual incorporation of thousands of returning soldiers into Canadian society, feelings towards the Canadian high command (Currie), the tabulation of the casualty statistics, the adequacy of pensions for disabled soldiers and their families, and how the Great war has been viewed over the decades until the present. As in the first volume, the writing style is clear, authoritative, accessible and always very engaging. The detailing of the various activities of the Canadian Corps's different military units can be a bit overwhelming at times; but the stories of some of the individual selfless sacrifices, astounding acts of heroism and the ultimate accomplishments of the Corps as a whole can leave the reader in awe. Once again, this is a book that can be read and appreciated by absolutely anyone.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By John Sargeant on Oct. 23 2009
Format: Paperback
Tim Cook retains his reputation as one of Canada's leading WW1 historians.
While recounting the course of the battles that Canada was involved in, he also keeps our interest by telling the intimate stories of the men who wore the Maple leaf. He resists the urge to have us believe that Canada was the sole reason for the allies success and is fair in his criticism and praise of the military and political characters in this sad drama.
This is a very readable book and one that should be in the library of every Canadian. Can't wait to see what he does with the next book on Currie and Hughes.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By John V. Gass on March 21 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I am not a professional book reviewer but as my Father's family was totaly involved in WW 1 I have read anything I can get my hands on relative to the Canadian involvement in that war. Tim Cook's treatment, in my opinion, is the best written to date. His research and subsequent publication is unbelievably excellent. Mr Cook's first volume "At The Sharp End", deserves the same comment. Anyone looking for a very readable detailed historical account of the Canadians in World War 1 cannot do better than these two volumes.
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Format: Paperback
Without doubt, the most comprehensive and personal presentation to date of Canada's involvement and the influence of her front-line soldiers through the Great War . . . A read for all Canadians in this 100th year commemoration of that conflict's origins. Don't be intimidated by the 1500+ pages (including Pt #1, The Sharp Edge). Neither repetitive nor redundant at any juncture and easily readable for teens on upwards.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Patrick Sullivan TOP 500 REVIEWER on June 15 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I still have some pages left, so I have not read the conclusion. This book covers every single aspect of a soldiers life in the Great War. Like a lot of Canadians, I had relatives that fought in the Great War. I wanted to know what they went through. You later realize why the quote "he never talked about the war," was so common to hear from older relatives. WW1 was not a pleasant experience. This book, and At The Sharp End, will give you everything there is to know about life on the Western front. Cook has done an outstanding job at researching the material.
While reading, there are times when it is a little rough to stomach all the stories of death and disease. The hardship these people endured, is almost beyond belief.
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Canadian forces became the sharp point of the Allied effort in Europe, and were used by the British as Shock Troops, hence the title. Sometimes they were badly handled by British Commanders who regarded them as cannon fodder, but by 1917 they had risen to being regarded as the finest soldiers on the Western Front, and were being directed by their own commanders. Sadly this volume includes Second and Third Battles of Ypres, the Third of which is often called Passchendaele, and was the bloodiest campaign the Canadians ever fought in. The ground was waterlogged, trenches became chin or deeper canals, and the German artillery had spent 4 years zeroing in on the Allied positions. The Germans were broken finally because of the healthier better equipped and by that time better fed troops, but it was a tragedy for both sides.
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Now that this sensational book has been written, Canadians will no longer be able to call World War I, which broke out in 1914, 'The Forgotten War'. Tim Cook, WWI historian at the Canadian War Museum, puts it all on the record vividly. He gives an exhaustive 648-page account (plus notes) that establishes facts and promotes pride in Canada's WW1 infantry forces' character and achievements.The reader is right at the front line as shock troops of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (part of the British
the strategies, tactics and action of battalions, groups and heroes of each battle in graphic detail. It is based on National Archives data previously locked up and pictures archived in the CMC. Short sentences and direct quotes interspersed with descriptions keep the narrative going at a fast pace. Without hyperbole or sentimentality, the author uses the victims' or witnesses' own words to convey the impact of horrific conditions, killing and destruction. The tone of the narrative is bitter sweet wherever possible and consistently proud. I was particularly interested to find out about shell shock, executions, trench community life, morale, family contacts, illnesses, leave and many other broader topics, all excellently covered.This is a valuable document for anyone wishing to know exactly what his or her relative did or didn't endure.It is a very good, readable, competent book and I recommend it to others. However, my advice to readers who might get bored by so many meticulous, comprehensive accounts of successive
battles, or who don't identify excitedly with battle manoeuvers, is to skip ahead.References to events further from Cook's topic, such as the Brest-Titovsk Treaty between Germany and Russia, should be checked out with other sources. And come prepared. All the way through it will seem like you are right there, ready to do or die, and that's not easy!
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