Shop Class as Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
  • List Price: CDN$ 32.50
  • You Save: CDN$ 12.12 (37%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 10 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Shop Class as Soulcraft: ... has been added to your Cart
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ships from the USA. Please allow 2 to 3 weeks for delivery. Book has a small amount of wear visible on the binding, cover, pages. Selection as wide as the Mississippi.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Shop Class as Soulcraft: An Inquiry Into the Value of Work Hardcover – Jun 2 2009


See all 12 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 20.38
CDN$ 15.78 CDN$ 10.20

2014 Books Gift Guide
Yes Please is featured in our 2014 Books Gift Guide. More gift ideas

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought



Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Press HC, The; 1 edition (June 2 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1594202230
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594202230
  • Product Dimensions: 14.7 x 2.3 x 21.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 386 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #187,348 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"It's appropriate that [Shop Class as Soulcraft] arrives in May, the month when college seniors commence real life. Skip Dr. Seuss, or a tie from Vineyard Vines, and give them a copy for graduation.... It's not an insult to say that Shop Class is the best self-help book that I've ever read. Almost all works in the genre skip the "self" part and jump straight to the "help." Crawford rightly asks whether today's cubicle dweller even has a respectable self....It's kind of like Heidegger and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance."
-Slate

"Matt Crawford's remarkable book on the morality and metaphysics of the repairman looks into the reality of practical activity. It is a superb combination of testimony and reflection, and you can't put it down."
-Harvey Mansfield, Professor of Government, Harvard University

"Every once in a great while, a book will come along that's brilliant and true and perfect for its time. Matthew B. Crawford's Shop Class as Soulcraft is that kind of book, a prophetic and searching examination of what we've lost by ceasing to work with our hands-and how we can get it back. During this time of cultural anxiety and reckoning, when the conventional wisdom that has long driven our wealthy, sophisticated culture is foundering amid an economic and spiritual tempest, Crawford's liberating volume appears like a lifeboat on the horizon."
-Rod Dreher, author of Crunchy Cons: The New Conservative Counterculture and Its Return to Roots

"This is a deep exploration of craftsmanship by someone with real, hands-on knowledge. The book is also quirky, surprising, and sometimes quite moving."
-Richard Sennett, author of The Craftsman

"Matt Crawford has written a brave and indispensable book. By making a powerful case for the enduring value of the manual trades, Shop Class as Soulcraft offers a bracing alternative to the techno-babble that passes for conventional wisdom, and points the way to a profoundly necessary reconnection with the material world. No one who cares about the future of human work can afford to ignore this book."
-Jackson Lears, Editor in Chief, Raritan

"We are on the verge of a national renewal. It will have more depth and grace if we read Crawford's book carefully and take it to heart. He is a sharp theorist, a practicing mechanic, and a captivating writer."
-Albert Borgmann, author of Real American Ethics

"Shop Class as Soulcraft is easily the most compelling polemic since The Closing of the American Mind. Crawford offers a stunning indictment of the modern workplace, detailing the many ways it deadens our senses and saps our vitality. And he describes how our educational system has done violence to our true nature as 'homo faber'. Better still, Crawford points in the direction of a richer, more fulfilling way of life. This is a book that will endure."
-Reihan Salam, associate editor at The Atlantic, co-author of Grand New Party

"Crawford reveals the satisfactions of the active craftsman who cultivates his own judgment, rather than being a passive consumer subject to manipulated fantasies of individuality and creativity."
- Nathan Tarcov, Committee on Social Thought, University of Chicago

Philosopher and motorcycle repair-shop owner Crawford extols the value of making and fixing things in this masterful paean to what he calls "manual competence," the ability to work with one's hands. According to the author, our alienation from how our possessions are made and how they work takes many forms: the decline of shop class, the design of goods whose workings cannot be accessed by users (such as recent Mercedes models built without oil dipsticks) and the general disdain with which we regard the trades in our emerging "information economy." Unlike today's "knowledge worker," whose work is often so abstract that standards of excellence cannot exist in many fields (consider corporate executives awarded bonuses as their companies sink into bankruptcy), the person who works with his or her hands submits to standards inherent in the work itself: the lights either turn on or they don't, the toilet flushes or it doesn't, the motorcycle roars or sputters. With wit and humor, the author deftly mixes the details of his own experience as a tradesman and then proprietor of a motorcycle repair shop with more philosophical considerations.
- Publishers Weekly, Starred review

Philosopher and motorcycle mechanic Crawford presents a fascinating, important analysis of the value of hard work and manufacturing. He reminds readers that in the 1990s vocational education (shop class) started to become a thing of the past as U.S. educators prepared students for the "knowledge revolution." Thus, an entire generation of American "thinkers" cannot, he says, do anything, and this is a threat to manufacturing, the fundamental backbone of economic development. Crawford makes real the experience of working with one's hands to make and fix things and the importance of skilled labor. His philosophical background is evident as he muses on how to live a pragmatic, concrete life in today's ever more abstract world and issues a clarion call for reviving trade and skill development classes in American preparatory schools. The result is inspired social criticism and deep personal exploration. Crawford's work will appeal to fans of Robert Pirsig's classic Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance and should be required reading for all educational leaders. Highly recommended; Crawford's appreciation for various trades may intrigue readers with white collar jobs who wonder at the end of each day what they really accomplished.
- Library Journal



About the Author

Matthew B. Crawford is a philosopher and mechanic. He has a Ph.D. in political philosophy from the University of Chicago and served as a postdoctoral fellow on its Committee on Social Thought. Currently a fellow at the University of Virginia's Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture, he owns and operates Shockoe Moto, an independent motorcycle repair shop in Richmond, Virginia.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By David Alston on July 12 2009
Format: Hardcover
Shop Class as Soul Craft is a very enjoyable book. It is a well researched, somewhat academic review of the relationship between people and their work and how people find value in work. The book isn't very long at about 200 pages, but is not a very quick read as some of the concepts are fairly involved. I would recommend to any young person starting out in the work force that they read the author's views on the transportablity of work. For people, like myself, nearing retirement age, it brought back pleasant memories of times when I felt that my work made a difference. I think his view of office work is a bit jaundiced, but none the less, he makes some very valid points, made more valid perhaps in the wake of Enron and other corporate deceptions.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ian Gordon Malcomson HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on Aug. 4 2010
Format: Paperback
In the great rush to improve our present lifestyle and secure our occupational futures, we, the workers of the world, have inadvertently trashed our appreciation for the real meaning of work. Crawford, in "Shop Class as Soulcraft", describes what many of us have lost in terms of becoming mere cogs in the industrial wheel that threatens to grind us into absolute submission because we no longer control the things we produce. This book takes both a cerebral and light-hearted approach in defining what truly constitutes an ideal workplace where the worker is an individual who enters into the joy of producing something that he or she can take personal pride in. While part of this book deals with the philosophy and psychology of why we have become industrial drones controlled by other people's wishes, Crawford offers his readers a ray of hope in the story he shares about his own decision to change. For him, an academic trained to be a 'cubical' professional, his secret passion had always been working on old motorcycles and cars. Returning to this later in his life, he discovered that there was virtue in working with one's hands. Manual labor involves an intellectual and mechanical sophistication that connects the mind with the body to create or preserve something that usually outlives and outperforms anything modern technology can build. Crawford's personal reflections are helpful in defining the need in all of us to come to grips with our identity in the workforce. To make that critical change is not easy. It will require a mindset that is given to appreciating detail, working under extended timelines, and willing to experiment with different options. The inevitable job satisfaction comes with knowing that you can work for yourself while having the ability to fix other people's problems.Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Weldergirl on Jan. 22 2011
Format: Hardcover
This was an incredible read - definitely opened my eyes as an educator about how we as a society have been conditioned to learn and work in one particular stream lined way. I ended up feeling frustrated at realizing that I have also been subjected to these methods, but somehow came out the other side as exactly the kind of person matthew talks about - a trades person first (welder) also independent (artist and small business owner) but also a professor who recognizing the errors in teaching the way we traditionally have, is hoping through practice to perhaps effect a shift that will benefit future students. i'm passing this book around my entire department. Thank you!
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Brad Tamlin on July 18 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed this book. I am an Electrician by trade, and now teach at a College. Leaving the trade to start a new career as an educator has been a difficult transition for me. I also worked in the corporate world for some time. I identify with the comparisons the author makes with "The Crew versus the Team" When a tradesperson joins the ranks of academics it can be intimidating. The way the author explains philosphy and relates it to trades is very interesting. He convinces the reader that working with your hands and appling a skill is highly cognitative. The best quote in the book is " If you don't vent the drain pipe like this, sewage gases will seep up through the water in the toilet, and the house will stink of shit" I recomend this book highly to anyone who teaches trades or shop related classes. It is also a good read for Managers to get inside the head of your subordinates and understand how to manage effectively.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.


Feedback