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Shot of Love Import


Price: CDN$ 10.14 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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Frequently Bought Together

Shot of Love + Saved + Slow Train Coming (Remastered)
Price For All Three: CDN$ 29.15


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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Feb. 1 2008)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: SBME
  • ASIN: B0012GN490
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)

Product Description

Reflective lyrics with flashes of brilliance from the master poet! Lenny Bruce; The Groom's Still Waiting at the Altar; Trouble; Every Grain of Sand, and more.

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Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Bill R. Moore on Aug. 18 2003
Format: Audio CD
Shot of Love and the album that preceded it, Saved, have received, through the years, critical drubbings along the lines of what Dylan's recent movie Masked and Anonymous has garnered. His gospel period, in general, has almost always been looked upon in a generally negative light, and is only now starting to get the credit it deserves with the release of Gotta Serve Somebody: The Gospel Songs of Bob Dylan, a collection which features contemporary gospel stars singing some of the man's best songs from the period.
Where does Shot of Love fit into all this? It is an underrated album. However it is not a great album, or a classic. It is much, much more secular than the first two gospel albums; indeed, only one song -- Property of Jesus - is unabashedly Christian. Several of the songs -- Heart of Mine, Lenny Bruce, and possibly several others -- are not Christian at all. There is almost none of the fire and brimstone here that Slow Trained Coming was loaded with; neither is it unabashedly gospel, as Saved was. Dylan wraps the virtues of Christianity up in more everyday forms, and does not bash us over the head dogmatically here; it's barely self-righteous, and it doesn't preach to the choir. Music-wise, none of the songs are in actual gospel style; several are even poppy. Others rock quite hard -- harder than anything since the mid-60's, in fact. Piano is the lead instrument on several songs, often played by Dylan himself. The backup singers do a good job here, and aren't overly intrusive or robotic-sounding, as they sometimes had been in the past. The legendary Jim Keltner is excellent on drums, as always. As for Dylan's singing, let it be known that the album contains some of Dylan's best vocal performances ever. His voice is as sweet as honey on In The Summertime -- a beautiful performance.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Douglas MacRae on April 2 2004
Format: Audio CD
This one of my favorite from Mr. Dylan. It's grown on me. I bought this album for the beautiful and transcendent Every Grain Of Sand, and because of hearing him live in Toronto in 1980. One of his most poetic, it seems inspired by William Blake. In this collection of excellent songs I see Dylan coming from a life-changing experience with Jesus that saw him writing everything with that focus to a point of balance. Now he has begun to write about "the reality of man", but filtered through his Christian understanding; less dogmatic. I still play each of the three or four CDs from this period of Dylan's career more than any other - Infidels included. (I've really tried to like his albums from the '60s and '70s but some of the Beat-inspired lyrics are just too obscure for me - interesting, but I can't relate! Maybe it's because I'm a latter-period Boomer.)
That being said, the music on this album is always great. The band is top-notch. We know from the way Dylan generally works in the studio that the sessions are played without much rehearsal. Indeed, the sounds on this record are warm and natural, with plenty of the natural room sounds on the tracks. This gives it a nice loose feeling which can yield mixed results. For example, Heart of Mine is slowed down here, and comes across as an unfortunately weaker recording of a great song. The unreleased version on the Biograph album is miles better. Other songs have been mentioned by other reviewers. There's not a single bad song here.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Pieter Uys HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on May 26 2003
Format: Audio CD
I know this album came in for a lot of criticism upon release but in retrospect it's not bad at all. Heart Of Mine has a great rolling rhythm and nice tempo changes, whilst Lenny Bruce is a minor masterpiece, a very moving tribute with lovely piano and organ. Every Grain Of Sand is a magnificent song when considered from a general spiritual angle, stripped of dogma. It sounds very mournful but has that transcendent, hopeful quality found in most kinds of gospel and other spiritual music. I also love Emmylou Harris' beautiful interpretation on her Wrecking Ball album, although she tweaked the lyrics a bit. In The Summertime with its nice harmonica touches reminds me a bit of some of Van Morrison's pastoral pieces. So all in all not a bad album judged on a purely musical level, containing at least two gems and another great song in Heart Of Mine. I like it!
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Format: Audio CD
_Shot of Love_, the third of Dylan's so-called "born again" trilogy of albums, is, musically, among his strongest releases of the 80s, with his voice still in decent shape, complemented by sympathetic backup vocalists. What's more, the religious messages (most of the time) are not too heavy-handed ("Property of Jesus" is a possible exception). The title track makes an overt reference to Jesus but in a manner that could easily be interpreted as secular (or maybe mythopoetic) rather than faithful. It would not be unrealistically charitable to call "Every Grain of Sand" non-denominational, though the references (for example, to "every sparrow falling") are a direct echo of the gospels. If you're knowledgeable about Dylan's music but have avoided this period in his career because you're not keen on having religion rammed down your gullet, it may be time to cut this record some slack. However, I must confess, I bought the album mostly in order to own a copy of "Lenny Bruce," a song that I have become convinced was Dylan's veiled tribute to Phil Ochs, who had hanged himself five years before this album was released. Consider these facts: 1) Ochs is wearing a coat that once belonged to Lenny Bruce on the cover of his _Pleasures of the Harbor_ album; 2) Dylan sings in "Lenny Bruce" that "[Bruce] is on some other shore / He didn't want to live any more," a description which seems more worthy of a suicide than an accidental drug overdose. 3) Most tellingly, Dylan sings of how he rode in a taxi with "Lenny Bruce" once and the journey seemed to take "a couple of months." This seems to be a reference to a story told about Dylan and Ochs in Marc Eliot's 1978 Ochs biography _Death of A Rebel_ (published just three years before the release of _Shot of Love_).Read more ›
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