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Shoveling Fuel for a Runaway Train: Errant Economists, Shameful Spenders, and a Plan to Stop Them All Paperback – Aug 1 2002


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 220 pages
  • Publisher: University of California Press (Aug. 1 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0520225147
  • ISBN-13: 978-0520225145
  • Product Dimensions: 1.7 x 14 x 20 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 204 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #398,633 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents


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"We should double the rate of growth, and we should double the size of the American economy!" Read the first page
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Format: Paperback
Brian has really impressed with his thoughtful analysis of our economy from both an intellectual and spirtual viewpoint. Unfortunately, none of this can be easily proved, but that is the case with the most important things in our lives, all of which have a spirtual base (religion, our role in society, role in the family, etc.).
Brian has uncovered and clarified issues which have probably been rolling around in the back of many of our minds, for example the link between Darwinism, Maslow's heirarchy, and sexuality. (The real spirit of how things work is deeply embedded in our passions, sexuality, etc, and we must uncover these things to get to the root of all critical life issues). He also proposed a viewpoint of the role of the wealthy in our society, how their behavior impacts our economny and ecology, and how we all are capable of the same behavior if we had a few more dollars in our pocket, so perhaps a little better understanding of each other across "classes" is in order.
Brian only loosely alluded to the role of addiction in the behavior of the wealthy (e.g. if you have a hundred million dollars, why do you need more, what are you trying to prove, and aren't you in a position to exercize the most important human / spirtual values?). Perhaps a closer look at the role of addiction and prevalance of addictive behaviors and how they contribute to "success" and sustain destructive behaviors and ego based delusions at the expense of a more spirtual well roundedness would be in order.
Brian makes an excellent point about how a real solution requires a change in the mindset of the populace (very Jeffersonian) to be more aware and more involved in solving these problems, however he falls short with solid solutions. But then again, maybe there are no simple solutions. This book is about awareness, and it does a great job at it.
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By A Customer on Jan. 3 2004
Format: Paperback
The first 106 pages of the book are well written and present a number of interesting notions about the dangers of our society's high regard for economic growth. Czech's arguments against the practicality of infinite growth (even though it may be theoretically possible according to neoclassical economists) are clear and well documented.
The underlying theme of the book is that neoclassical economists support a theory that the economy can sustain infinite growth, while the ecological economists claim that at some point, the growth will inevitably slow and then stop (more likely crash) because it is impossible in practicality to sustain growth forever. The book starts off with some interesting points about economic growth and sustainability in Part I, and then goes off the deep end in Part II as the author shares his proposed plan for achieving a 'steady-state economy.'
The plan in a nutshell: everyone should live very modestly, regardless of their income level, and whenever they notice someone else spending more money than they feel is necessary, they should immediately judge them and try to shame them into changing their ways. The goal is for society to become repulsed by conspicuous consumption to the extent that those in the financial top 1% of society are pressured to reform themselves and give their extra money away to those in need.
Although Part I is good enough to justify the purchase price, I would recommend skipping Part II in its entirety.
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Format: Paperback
I was drawn to this book after it was suggested as an alternative here at Amazon to a so-called "perpetual growth" tome (a book, by the way, that actually points to no such thing), but I've decided against buying Czech's book for fear of becoming an overspent American. Sorry, but I'm not contributing to the royalty check of Czech.
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Format: Paperback
I was initially attracted to this book by its title: that our growth economy has become a runaway train into which our economic efforts are merely shoveling fuel is a great metaphor. ... I expected the second part of the book, in which the author prescribes his recommendations, to be weak. Instead, I found his proposal and its supporting arguments arresting. And the book throughout is engaging and highly readable.
I'm too lazy or rushed to try to provide a summary that will do justice to his proposal here. Suffice it to say that I think what he offers is workable and appropriate for our society. It is a way that can significantly help us to get there (to sustainability) from here, with the best of our system of government and cultural values intact. Let there be no mistaking it - Czech prescribes a nonviolent revolution! While I don't think his proposal is the last word on the matter or necessarily the main approach sustainability advocates should use, I do think it has influenced me significantly and in good ways that will foster effective action. Isn't that what you would want from a book like this?
Having said that, I think Czech's approach would be well supplemented by an emphasis on the creative possibilities of sustainability. Other sustainability voices (e.g., Hawken, Lovins, McDonough, Braungart) seem to emphasize the building, restoring, redesigning, and creating. Czech emphasizes restraint. Given our fix, both are needed. And greater attention to virtue, as David Orr has argued, would help all around.
Finally, I'll mention that ecological economics, which Czech espouses throughout the book, seems to be a real up-and-comer. I've just learned of a development called post-autistic economics, which started in France and is akin to ecological economics. Something is afoot here! We could be in for a paradigm shift, and this book could be instrumental in shaping and promoting it.
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