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Shunning Paperback – Jan 16 1980


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 105 pages
  • Publisher: Turnstone Press; Reprint edition (Jan. 16 1980)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0888010389
  • ISBN-13: 978-0888010384
  • Product Dimensions: 22.5 x 15.3 x 0.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 177 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #290,686 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

“The Shunning tears heads off clichés, making us see a whole place freshly. It is a complete world, reeling and tilting but enduring.”—Books in Canada --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Patrick Friesen writes poetry, essays, drama, scripts, songs, and text for dance and music. The author of over a dozen books of poetry, Friesen has collaborated with various musicians, including Big Dave McLean, Cate Friesen, and Marilyn Lerner, and with choreographer-dancers Margie Gillis, Stephanie Ballard, and Ruth Cansfield. Friesen also teaches, part-time, as a sessional in the Writing Department at the University of Victoria. His most recent poetry book is jumping in the asylum (Quattro Books, 2011). Formerly of Winnipeg, Friesen now lives in Brentwood Bay on Vancouver Island.

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Most helpful customer reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 3 1997
Format: Paperback
Friesen stuns with potent, disturbing images, and awakens a yearning for the sacred. His book, which is actually one long poem, is a masterpiece. Friesen captures a longing long denied us--a thirst for a faith--and firmly pulls the reader into this story of a Mennonite farmer's destruction. The farmer is excommunicated (shunned) by his church for questioning an aspect of the Christian faith. The story is told through the eyes of the farmer's brother, usually, but occasionally we see through the eyes of the wife, the children, the townspeople, and, perhaps, a distanced, clinical god.
Before this work is dismissed as yet another "to hell with Grandpa's religion" book, it is important to note that the book pays no attention to the validity of the farmer's quandry, but instead focuses on the pain, the isolation, and the loss, of a solitary man in his microcosm
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Painful, achingly beautiful picture of faith, and its fading June 3 1997
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Friesen stuns with potent, disturbing images, and awakens a yearning for the sacred. His book, which is actually one long poem, is a masterpiece. Friesen captures a longing long denied us--a thirst for a faith--and firmly pulls the reader into this story of a Mennonite farmer's destruction. The farmer is excommunicated (shunned) by his church for questioning an aspect of the Christian faith. The story is told through the eyes of the farmer's brother, usually, but occasionally we see through the eyes of the wife, the children, the townspeople, and, perhaps, a distanced, clinical god.
Before this work is dismissed as yet another "to hell with Grandpa's religion" book, it is important to note that the book pays no attention to the validity of the farmer's quandry, but instead focuses on the pain, the isolation, and the loss, of a solitary man in his microcosm


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