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Signals in the Air: Native Broadcasting in America Hardcover – Jan 16 1995


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 200 pages
  • Publisher: Praeger (Jan. 16 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0275948765
  • ISBN-13: 978-0275948764
  • Product Dimensions: 2.1 x 15.8 x 23.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 318 g
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,098,102 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
While American Indian broadcast station signals cover less than a sixth of the United States land mass, the Indigenous population itself is widespread. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Amazon.com: 1 review
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Signals covers underrepresented topic Dec 10 1999
By B. Freeman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Perhaps it is as a result of the influx of newer media or the fact that it's always been around for most of us, that we often take radio for granted. And yet what a valuable resource the signals that permeate the ether can be. Take for example the role of radio in the Native American community. That's exactly the subject of Keith's book. I borrowed it from a professor of mine and am enjoying the read. It's an interesting and important treatise on the underreported native broadcasters. If you love radio, especially the kind that really serves a community (that's me!), and are at all into programming aspects, I recommend you get the book.


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