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Silent House [Import]


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Product Details

  • Format: Subtitled, NTSC, Import
  • Language: Spanish
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: UNRATED
  • Studio: Ifc Independent Film
  • Release Date: Sept. 13 2011
  • ASIN: B00561BN3G

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 19 reviews
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
A Minimalist Horror Experiment From Uruguay--A Tense Film That's Not For Everyone Sept. 16 2011
By K. Harris - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
The unusual "The Silent House" (La Casa Muda) from Gustavo Hernandez is a fascinating example of rogue, low budget filmmaking. With a reputed budget of six thousand dollars, the film is sparse and minimal and sold on a gimmick. The body of the movie is filmed in one uninterrupted take as the camera follows a young woman through a perilous evening. Those expecting big thrills, graphic violence, or special effects enhancement may not be the target audience. It doesn't surprise me that I have heard this experience described as dull in some camps. It does, after all, follow the lead character through a creepy house in real time with a minimum of dialogue. It creates an effective mood with music, sounds, and the claustrophobic film technique that squeezes the viewer into the same frame as the heroine. I, personally, enjoyed the low-key approach and found the film to have a surprisingly satisfying payoff. But prepare to have patience. If this doesn't sound like your ideal vision of what a suspense film should be, it probably isn't.

The movie begins as a father and his daughter approach an abandoned estate on foot. It seems they have been contracted with some clean-up work. Meeting the owner, they outline a strategic plan. A few minutes later they are settling in for sleep (I guess they're going to get an early start), and before the daughter drifts off--things start to go bump in the night. When she's finally able to convince her sleeping daddy to go investigate, it sounds as if he encounters some trouble upstairs. After her father's attack, the girl must find a key to escape this escalating nightmare and she heads to the forbidden second floor (the owner has warned them of its dangers). The search through the house has an effective creepiness as the protagonist seeks to evade her pursuer. Even though things unfold in real time, the house may just hold some secrets that no one was expecting.

I truly appreciated this simple and straightforward film. Hernandez has taken the severe limitations of his budget and crafted a stylish little film for the art house crowd. It's biggest issue is that it will undoubtedly be marketed to an audience expecting something much bigger and more spectacular. This is a film that succeeds by creating a tense atmosphere as opposed to providing loud scares. One scene, in particular, has a pitch black room being lit sporadically with a camera's flash bulb. I've seen the device used before, but here it is really effective. And if you think you know where things are headed, you might get a pleasant surprise in the end. This intimate experience is NOT for everyone--people that hate it will do so fervently and its supporters will be likewise vocal. I really admired "The Silent House," Hernandez's grand experiment, and Florencia Colucci's intense lead performance. KGHarris, 9/11.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
A Minimalist Horror Experiment From Uruguay--A Tense Film That's Not For Everyone Sept. 16 2011
By K. Harris - Published on Amazon.com
The unusual "The Silent House" (La Casa Muda) from Gustavo Hernandez is a fascinating example of rogue, low budget filmmaking. With a reputed budget of six thousand dollars, the film is sparse and minimal and sold on a gimmick. The body of the movie is filmed in one uninterrupted take as the camera follows a young woman through a perilous evening. Those expecting big thrills, graphic violence, or special effects enhancement may not be the target audience. It doesn't surprise me that I have heard this experience described as dull in some camps. It does, after all, follow the lead character through a creepy house in real time with a minimum of dialogue. It creates an effective mood with music, sounds, and the claustrophobic film technique that squeezes the viewer into the same frame as the heroine. I, personally, enjoyed the low-key approach and found the film to have a surprisingly satisfying payoff. But prepare to have patience. If this doesn't sound like your ideal vision of what a suspense film should be, it probably isn't.

The movie begins as a father and his daughter approach an abandoned estate on foot. It seems they have been contracted with some clean-up work. Meeting the owner, they outline a strategic plan. A few minutes later they are settling in for sleep (I guess they're going to get an early start), and before the daughter drifts off--things start to go bump in the night. When she's finally able to convince her sleeping daddy to go investigate, it sounds as if he encounters some trouble upstairs. After her father's attack, the girl must find a key to escape this escalating nightmare and she heads to the forbidden second floor (the owner has warned them of its dangers). The search through the house has an effective creepiness as the protagonist seeks to evade her pursuer. Even though things unfold in real time, the house may just hold some secrets that no one was expecting.

I truly appreciated this simple and straightforward film. Hernandez has taken the severe limitations of his budget and crafted a stylish little film for the art house crowd. It's biggest issue is that it will undoubtedly be marketed to an audience expecting something much bigger and more spectacular. This is a film that succeeds by creating a tense atmosphere as opposed to providing loud scares. One scene, in particular, has a pitch black room being lit sporadically with a camera's flash bulb. I've seen the device used before, but here it is really effective. And if you think you know where things are headed, you might get a pleasant surprise in the end. This intimate experience is NOT for everyone--people that hate it will do so fervently and its supporters will be likewise vocal. I really admired "The Silent House," Hernandez's grand experiment, and Florencia Colucci's intense lead performance. KGHarris, 9/11.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Loved this movie Oct. 18 2011
By E. Speaks - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
I loved this movie. It had the feel of the old fashioned horror films I have always loved. I think the actress was great and the ending was very surprising. I also like the fact that it was all filmed in one take. That was amazing!! The director should be complimented. This movie was awesome and I will watch it again and again.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Scary As Hell Sept. 30 2012
By Stephen B. O'Blenis - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
The Silent House (aka La Casa Muda) is an intense, (seemingly) simple story about a girl and her father hired by a friend of the family, to go out to a dilipidated, boarded-up house in the country and spend the weekend getting the place cleaned up and in reasonably good condition for sale. Once there, they find themselves the victims of a terror within the house.

Filmed in one continuous shot (and for a grand total of six thousand dollars), the 'one continuous shot' angle serves as more than an interesting novely or a way to actually make a good movie on such a tight budget: it puts the happenings one hundred per cent in real time and narrows the entirety of the movie into a very tight, intense focus. It's not a 'found-footage' movie (although it does share a lot of the atmosphere and characteristics of the best of that sub-genre), but the camera does stay on the girl and her immediate surroundings for at least 90% of the time, roaming away only for a few key moments. In this way it remains very much a point-of-view film.

This is one that requires close attention and, preferably, multiple viewings. Some very interesting things happened watching this movie. On my first viewing, a lot of things that were going on, especially with the way the characters acted, didn't seem to be making much sense until the end when things started falling into place and I thought I had it pretty much figured out. As the movie finishes, one is left not only shaken but wondering if they pieced things togther right and, as with other mindbenders like The Sixth Sense (Collector's Edition Series), Spider Forest and Shutter Island, you're left wanting to watch it again.

On the second viewing is where it got weird. Watching closely you may see that certain assumptions from the first watch don't really play out or make sense anymore. Some of the explanations didn't seem to fit as much. Here's the strangest part, and something I don't remember ever happeening to quite the same effect with any other movie: as logic breaks down more and more, the movie abruptly gets scarier and scarier. It's like there's something the conscious mind isn't quite picking up on, but is freaking the hell out of the subconscious. Not that it wasn't already disturbing and frightening, but this whole 'subconscious freak-out' thing really pushed it over the top. I've talked to several people who've seen this who generally get different interpretations of things in here, both from me and from each other. It's possible there simply is no 'tipping point' where everything clicks in and makes sense (like with The Sixth Sense) but there's definately something weird going on.

I do generally love 'open-to-interpretation' movies with ambiguous endings, but often times This Much ambiguosness might be overkill. With The Silent House it jusy makes it tremendously creepy and haunting. A great movie, and a great entry for Uruguay onto the international horror scene (they've done a couple of horror movies before, but I don't think any of them got much of a release outside their own backyard; I know I hhaven't managed to see them).

Fright fans have got to get The Silent House.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
not the ending that i wanted, but still memorable Feb. 28 2012
By celticriver - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
i didn't know about this movie until i looked up info on the soon to be released remake coming out in march. i wanted to see what the original was like. very nicely structured horror movie. while i wasn't too crazy about the ending, i didn't all together hate it. apparently, i've been watching hollywood-styled horror movies too much.

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