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So You're New Again: How to Succeed in a New Job Paperback – Jan 1 2001


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 78 pages
  • Publisher: Berrett-Koehler Publishers; 1 edition (Jan. 1 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1583761691
  • ISBN-13: 978-1583761694
  • Product Dimensions: 15.3 x 0.7 x 22.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 141 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,980,491 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From the Publisher

How to Succeed When You Change Jobs
Part Three of a three-part series of a series of practical guidebooks on work transitions. These new books guide new hires—and their managers—step by step through the "breaking-in" process that is absolutely essential for helping new employees thrive. It is relatively easy to get new hires to be competent to perform the basic tasks they were hired to do. But success on the job is due to much more than that. It comes from understanding how the organization really works—the unique aspects of how things get done in that particular organization. And it comes from learning how to "fit in"—knowing how to get accepted, get respected, and earn credibility.

The three books in the series are:
How to Succeed in Your First Job: Tips for New College Graduates
Helping Your New Employee Succeed: Tips for Managers of New College Graduates
So, You’re New Again: How to Succeed When You Change Jobs

Built around author Ed Holton’s dynamic 12-step process—extensively field-tested and firmly grounded in research—these three volumes give new college graduates and their supervisors, as well as seasoned professionals who’ve changed jobs, essential insights and tools for mastering a variety of transition challenges.

Given the high costs associated with new employee turnover, no organization can afford to leave the new employee assimilation process to chance. Corporate human resources directors, managers of new employees, individual employees making job transitions, and career counselors alike will find powerful and practical new ideas and tools in these essential handbooks.

About the Author

Elwood F. Holton III

Elwood F. Holton III, Associate Professor of Human Resource Development at Louisiana State University, has consulted to J.P. Morgan, Enterprise Rent-A-Car, U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. General Services Administration, and the Multiple Sclerosis Society, and many others. He regularly consults with and provides training programs to businesses, government agencies, nonprofit organizations, and universities. He has consulted with J. P. Morgan, Honeywell, the U.S. Department of Energy, and many others. He has written and published widely in the area of human resource development and is president of the Academy of Human Resource Development, a global association of HRD researchers and reflective practitioners.

Books by the author:
Results

Human Resource Development Research Handbook

How to Succeed in Your First Job: Tips for New College Graduates

Helping Your New Employee Succeed: Tips for Managers of New College Graduates So You’re New Again: How to Succeed When You Change Jobs

Sharon S. Naquin

Sharon S. Naquin is Director of the Office of HRD Research at Louisiana State University. She was formerly Vice President of Savings Operations and Human Resources with a major bank.

Books by the author:
How to Succeed in Your First Job: Tips for New College Graduates
Helping Your New Employee Succeed: Tips for Managers of New College Graduates
So, You’re New Again: How to Succeed When You Change Jobs


Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
Congratulations! You have decided to make a career transition, either by changing jobs within your organization or moving to a new organization. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Paperback
Authors Elwood F. Holton III and Sharon S. Naquin, both academics, invested substantial research to produce a little book that might just solve the very big midlife quandaries faced by workers whose jobs have been downsized or exported to another country. People who thought they would never need to take a different job find themselves the new person in a new office again, with no tools to help them cope other than the lessons of the corporate culture they left behind. However, using old cultural information in a new place is the road to disaster, according to the learned authors, who do a fine job of explaining why. Businesses are culture clubs and new hires must learn to get along before they can get ahead. At fewer than 100 pages, this is, nevertheless, a little redundant. Perhaps we need to hear the bell ring clearly, over and over, for the content is useful stuff simply told. For that reason, We recommend this to anyone contemplating a move, to every new hire and to every HR officer as part of the pre-employment package given to all experienced applicants.
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Format: Paperback
Whenever you move from one assignment to another in your professional life, whether due to a promotion or a complete career change, the move carries with it a requirement to relearn some parts of your job and how you act at work. This book attempts to establish a template to help you through that process.
The book does a good job of laying out the basic requirements you need to address when entering a new job, laying out a one-year, twelve-step plan to ensure you are accepted by your co-workers and supervisors, all of which is designed to make sure you do a better job at your new position. The authors first define the problem, pointing out how newcomers are generally perceived in organizations, and pitfalls they tend to encounter while trying to gain acceptance. They then take you through their twelve-steps, which are prioritized to take you through your first year at work while increasing your credibility with your new co-workers. By working through their twelve steps, you present a better image to the outside, which helps get you accepted into the organization more quickly. And once that is done, you will be far more effective in executing your duties and helping your organization improve.
The book is pretty slim, and some additional discussion of each step would make it more valuable. As a baseline, however, this book provides a good way to approach any new position.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
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Format: Paperback
This is a good book oveall. It offers some valuable insight
regarding being succesful in your new job. However, this book never mentions the 90 day probationary period. I beleive this is becoming more and more important in our competitive work force. A lot of the material is common sense. Like avoiding
comparing jobs too much.
Still, it's a good book overall and I like the 12-step program.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 8 reviews
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
A valuable asset when changing jobs or positions Dec 1 2001
By Andrew Olmsted - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Whenever you move from one assignment to another in your professional life, whether due to a promotion or a complete career change, the move carries with it a requirement to relearn some parts of your job and how you act at work. This book attempts to establish a template to help you through that process.
The book does a good job of laying out the basic requirements you need to address when entering a new job, laying out a one-year, twelve-step plan to ensure you are accepted by your co-workers and supervisors, all of which is designed to make sure you do a better job at your new position. The authors first define the problem, pointing out how newcomers are generally perceived in organizations, and pitfalls they tend to encounter while trying to gain acceptance. They then take you through their twelve-steps, which are prioritized to take you through your first year at work while increasing your credibility with your new co-workers. By working through their twelve steps, you present a better image to the outside, which helps get you accepted into the organization more quickly. And once that is done, you will be far more effective in executing your duties and helping your organization improve.
The book is pretty slim, and some additional discussion of each step would make it more valuable. As a baseline, however, this book provides a good way to approach any new position.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Packed with Knowledge! March 1 2004
By Rolf Dobelli - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Authors Elwood F. Holton III and Sharon S. Naquin, both academics, invested substantial research to produce a little book that might just solve the very big midlife quandaries faced by workers whose jobs have been downsized or exported to another country. People who thought they would never need to take a different job find themselves the new person in a new office again, with no tools to help them cope other than the lessons of the corporate culture they left behind. However, using old cultural information in a new place is the road to disaster, according to the learned authors, who do a fine job of explaining why. Businesses are culture clubs and new hires must learn to get along before they can get ahead. At fewer than 100 pages, this is, nevertheless, a little redundant. Perhaps we need to hear the bell ring clearly, over and over, for the content is useful stuff simply told. For that reason, We recommend this to anyone contemplating a move, to every new hire and to every HR officer as part of the pre-employment package given to all experienced applicants.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Good book overall but lacks first 90 day strategy Sept. 10 2002
By dydz - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a good book oveall. It offers some valuable insight
regarding being succesful in your new job. However, this book never mentions the 90 day probationary period. I beleive this is becoming more and more important in our competitive work force. A lot of the material is common sense. Like avoiding
comparing jobs too much.
Still, it's a good book overall and I like the 12-step program.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Lacks depth June 15 2011
By Selene - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book has a 12 stage process. It gives ideas on what needs to be done - mostly common sense like "make a good first impression" or "use interpersonal skills" but it does not go on to elaborate or give examples. It lacks depth and because the steps are fairly common sense anyway, the book lacks quality and is really not that helpful. I would not recommend this book.
Good reminder read Oct. 9 2013
By Troy Brumley - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
There's nothing in here that isn't obvious, but it is good to be reminded of the information in the book. It's a quick read but I didn't feel that I didn't get my money or time's worth for the effort. I ordered this when I was changing jobs for the first time in 15 years (I don't job hop) and wanted to make sure I didn't screw up the transition. Good book, quick read, good reminders.


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