The Social Conquest of Earth and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 18.50
  • List Price: CDN$ 29.50
  • You Save: CDN$ 11.00 (37%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Social Conquest Of Earth, The Hardcover – Mar 27 2012


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 18.50
CDN$ 18.50 CDN$ 21.02

Up to 90% Off Textbooks

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Join Amazon Student in Canada


Frequently Bought Together

Social Conquest Of Earth, The + On Human Nature: With a new Preface, Revised Edition
Price For Both: CDN$ 37.27


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought



Product Details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Liveright; 1 edition (March 27 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0871404133
  • ISBN-13: 978-0871404138
  • Product Dimensions: 1.7 x 0.3 x 2.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 662 g
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #74,343 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

I just finished The Social Conquest of Earth, a fabulous book. --President Bill Clinton"

About the Author

Edward O. Wilson, a professor emeritus at Harvard University, is the author of more than twenty-five books, including the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Ants and the bestselling novel Anthill (ISBN 978 0 393 33970 3). Also available: The Superorganism (ISBN 978 0 393 06704 0) and From So Simple a Beginning (ISBN 978 0 393 06134 5).

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

2.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
Wilson has long been recognized as the expert on ants and other “eusocial” insects, which live together in altruistic groups of specialized workers. Some of his critics think that he has applied his insights into ants rather too directly to human social groups, but I didn’t get that impression from the book.

Indeed, Wilson is careful to distinguish between humans and other social species, including our closest primate relatives. He makes this distinction early, and he keeps returning to it.

There are major differences between humans and the insects even aside from our unique possession of culture, language, and high intelligence. Prehuman ancestors had to achieve eusociality in a radically different way from the instinct-driven insects. The pathway to eusociality was charted by a contest between selection based on the relative success of individuals within groups versus relative success among groups.

The insects could evolve to eusociality by individual selection in the queen line, generation to generation; the prehumans evolved to eusociality by the interplay of selection at the level of individual selection and at the level of the group.

One of the most engaging ideas in The Social Conquest of Earth is Wilson’s claim that multi-level selection is the engine that drives the duality of human nature. In its simplest form, Wilson’s idea is that the tension we all feel between selfish and generous, aggressive and accepting, “me” and “us,” is the eternal clash between the contrary impulses of the biological products of individual and group selection.

The human condition is an endemic turmoil rooted in the evolution processes that created us. The worst in our nature coexists with the best, and so it will ever be.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Santos on Aug. 21 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I was sorely disappointed with the Social Conquest of the Earth. I had read the essay Edward Wilson co-wrote with David Sloan Wilson on group selection and its place in sociobiology a few years ago in the Quarterly Review of Biology, and had been looking forward to a book by E.O. Wilson on the subject for some time. I had previously read Consilience and found it immensely rewarding. For someone with a growing interest in evolution (but no formal education in the hard sciences) it was a real joy to read and I took much from it. Not least of which was a great respect for Wilson's vast knowledge, not only of science, but also of the humanities. I had also read On Human Nature, and although it was quite dated by the time it fell into my hands, it was still very insightful. Wilson has made a tremendous contribution to the sciences, particularly evolutionary biology. His work on sociobiology and its offshoot, evolutionary psychology, has been revolutionary. Not just in the 1970s when he began writing about it, but even now. Over the last (roughly) decade, a small library of work has been produced on the importance of cooperation in evolution and the role evolution has played in the development of moral systems. Much of this has its modern roots in Wilson's contribution to evolution.

Unfortunately, this book fell far short of what I had hoped Wilson would contribute to this area of evolutionary studies. The book, overall, did not build toward a coherent argument in favour of group selection's importance to evolution. The chapters read more like individual, second-rate essays on a disconnected issues that only loosely link back to group selection. At certain points, he seems to barely make an effort to tie in individual chapters with the overall stated objective of the book.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Brian Griffith TOP 500 REVIEWER on Sept. 9 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
At first, Wilson seems very hard-headed and technical with his intricate analysis of how social life evolved. He's perhaps the world's greatest expert on social insects, so his comparison of sociality among the bugs and the humans gives a great combination of fine detail with broad perspective. Because Wilson looks at clanishness and meat eating as utterly necessary steps in the evolution of human communities, I thought he was going to defend tribalism as a necessary reality of life. But as he reviews human history and modern social trends, he sees a critical path toward inclusivity, creativity, and mutual care as the requirements for success, which will replace tribal-style culture and religion as known in the past.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jacques cyr on March 26 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I particularly appreciated the beginning and the end. The middle part was to technical for me to remember, however it did give me an idea of the scope of the subject.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By chaser on Oct. 11 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It is a disappointing read. Not relevant to my understanding of social gatherings.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.


Feedback