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Solitude-Solitaire


Price: CDN$ 22.95
Only 1 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Vanderbilt CA.
2 new from CDN$ 22.95 13 used from CDN$ 0.01

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Frequently Bought Together

Solitude-Solitaire + World Falling Down + Collector's Series - Faithfull
Price For All Three: CDN$ 47.12

These items are shipped from and sold by different sellers.


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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Jan. 22 1987)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Warner Bros
  • ASIN: B000002L9Z
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #66,610 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Big Mistake
2. They Don't Make 'Em Like They Used To
3. Glory Of Love
4. Queen Of The Masquerade Ball
5. Daddy's Girl
6. The Next Time I Fall
7. Wake To Love
8. Solitude/Solitaire
9. Only Love Knows Why

Product Description

--This text refers to an alternate Audio CD edition.

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Audio CD
Leaving Chicago behind him, Peter released this album to kick of his solo career, (perhaps he should be a footballer then. Sorry, that was an awful joke.) to some success. I will try and be fair in the review that follows however my personel opinion is undoubtibly going to creep in.
Now, first of all I shall say that this deserves 3 stars, no more no less. This is because, firstly it is a very dated album. It is the definition of eighties pop. However that is not to say it is bad, just very uncool. Musically it is actually quite good, not up to Chicago's declining standerds, but still decent. It is the sort of album you put on when you've listened to all your other albums and got bored of them. And upon listening to it you think 'Oh, it's better than I gave it credit for.' In my opinion, it is perfecly decent and worth getting but it will not be one of those great albums. Of course, many of you reading this have looked at this album because you love it, a few because you want to buy it, and another few because you hate it. So, for those of you who want to hear the album being praised, go to a 5 star review, for the few looking for advice on buying it, look at any review (preferably continueing mine) and for those of you who came here to hate it... It's an awful album, I can't believe it was ever released, and as for Peter... Happy now you haters? Anyway, in conclusion, if you like latter Chicago get this, if you like other Cetera works get this, and if you like eighties pop get this.
I hope I've steered you right.
Thank you, and goodnight/day/morning/evening...
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Format: Audio CD
With his departure from Chicago following 17, bassist/vocalist Peter Cetera was quick to go on the solo wagon, as his debut, Solitude/Solitaire came out, ironically at the same time his former band emerged with 18 with a new lead singer. Cetera seems to have left much of the band's sound behind, embracing a fresher but more conventional pop approach, filled with synths and horns, hardly surprising given that the producer was Michael Omartian.
"Big Mistake" is light Duran Duran-type pop about women being the victim of a smooth-talking love and leave type, and says that women don't make that big mistake only once. The song ends with a brief flurry of synth and horns.
The frantic and bouncy "They Don't Make'Em Like They Used To" is an example of Sheena Easton style New Wave. And despite what the title leads one to think, the next line puts down that assumption with "I think they're better than before." The they in the title is about women, which won't go well given the analogy of women being rolled off the assembly line.
The next song may smack of 80's Chicago, but given that David Foster's one of the co-writers, hardly surprising. The synth pop ballad "The Glory Of Love," from Karate Kid Part II resurrects old-fashioned chivalry with lines such as "a man who will fight for your honour/I'll be the hero you're thinking of," and "knight in shining armour." I remembered liking this song a lot, but the theme of women needing their honour fought for and rescued is very much passe.
However, it's the next ballad single from the album, "The Next Time I Fall," with languid dreamy keyboard work matching more his duetting partner Amy Grant's softer voice. One of my favourite ballads from the decade.
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Format: Audio CD
With his departure from Chicago following 17, bassist/vocalist Peter Cetera was quick to go on the solo wagon, as his debut, Solitude/Solitaire came out, ironically at the same time his former band emerged with 18 with a new lead singer. Cetera seems to have left much of the band's sound behind, embracing a fresher but more conventional and inoffensive pop approach, filled with synths and horns, hardly surprising given that the producer was Michael Omartian.
"Big Mistake" is light Duran Duran-type pop about women being the victim of a smooth-talking love and leave type, and says that women don't make that big mistake only once. The song ends with a brief flurry of synth and horns.
The frantic and bouncy "They Don't Make'Em Like They Used To" is an example of Sheena Easton style New Wave. And despite what the title leads one to think, the next line puts down that assumption with "I think they're better than before." The they in the title is about women, which won't go well given the analogy of women being manufactured products.
The next song may smack of 80's Chicago, but given that David Foster's one of the co-writers, hardly surprising. The synth pop ballad "The Glory Of Love," from Karate Kid Part II resurrects old-fashioned chivalry with lines such as "a man who will fight for your honour/I'll be the hero you're thinking of," and "knight in shining armour." I remembered liking this song a lot, but with the element of females having their honour fought for and rescued, I imagine feminists will be seething in rage at this song.
However, it's the next ballad single from the album, "The Next Time I Fall," with languid dreamy keyboard work matching more his duetting partner Amy Grant's softer voice. One of my favourite ballads from the decade.
Read more ›
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