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Sonatas Violin & Harpsichord

Giuliano Carmignola , Bach Johann Sebastian Audio CD
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

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Product Details


Disc: 1
1. Sonata No.1 In B Minor For Violin And Harpsichord, BWV 1014: I. Adagio
2. Sonata No.1 In B Minor For Violin And Harpsichord, BWV 1014: II. Allegro
3. Sonata No.1 In B Minor For Violin And Harpsichord, BWV 1014: III. Andante
4. Sonata No.1 In B Minor For Violin And Harpsichord, BWV 1014: IV. Allegro
5. Sonata No.2 In A Major For Violin And Harpsichord, BWV 1015: I. (Dolce)
6. Sonata No.2 In A Major For Violin And Harpsichord, BWV 1015: II. Allegro
7. Sonata No.2 In A Major For Violin And Harpsichord, BWV 1015: III. Andante Un Poco
8. Sonata No.2 In A Major For Violin And Harpsichord, BWV 1015: IV. Presto
9. Sonata No.3 In E Major For Violin And Harpsichord, BWV 1016: I. Adagio
10. Sonata No.3 In E Major For Violin And Harpsichord, BWV 1016: II. Allegro
See all 12 tracks on this disc
Disc: 2
1. Sonata No.4 In C Minor For Violin And Harpsichord, BWV 1017: I. Largo
2. Sonata No.4 In C Minor For Violin And Harpsichord, BWV 1017: II. Allegro
3. Sonata No.4 In C Minor For Violin And Harpsichord, BWV 1017: III. Adagio
4. Sonata No.4 In C Minor For Violin And Harpsichord, BWV 1017: IV. Allegro
5. Sonata No.5 In F Minor For Violin And Harpsichord, BWV 1018: I. Largo
6. Sonata No.5 In F Minor For Violin And Harpsichord, BWV 1018: II. Allegro
7. Sonata No.5 In F Minor For Violin And Harpsichord, BWV 1018: III. Adagio
8. Sonata No.5 In F Minor For Violin And Harpsichord, BWV 1018: IV. Vivace
9. Sonata No.6 In G Major For Violin And Harpsichord, BWV 1019: I. Allegro
10. Sonata No.6 In G Major For Violin And Harpsichord, BWV 1019: II. Largo
See all 13 tracks on this disc

Product Description

Amazon.ca

Bach's Sonatas for Violin and Harpsichord hardly lack for excellent recorded versions in the period instrument department, including these sensitive and musicianly collaborations between Giuliano Carmignola and Andrea Marcon. Tempos rarely move faster than the music can sing, and cultivated vocalism characterizes Carmignola's sweet, silvery timbre, which differs from Andrew Manze's grittier approach. Indeed, you hardly notice Carmignola's bow arm at all in the way his long, sustained notes seem to materialize from within the harpsichord. A genuine give and take prevails as the musicians effortlessly adjust to each other's foreground and background roles. Carmignola eschews the whimsical embellishments Fabio Biondi brings to these scores, yet he varies repeats through subtle changes in accent, color, and phrasing. Sony's spacious engineering contrasts to the Podger-Pinnock edition's close-up, analytical sonics, yet the instruments resonate with full-bodied clarity. This release, in sum, is more than just a worthwhile contender in a crowded catalog. --Jed Distler

Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Bach Beautifully Played July 4 2002
Format:Audio CD
Giuliano Carmignola is a musician's musician. He was "discovered" by Sony when he was around the age of 50, having spent many decades in a corner of Italy quietly, calmly doing what he loves to do: playing music, considering music. We know this because we can clearly hear this in his sound. His sound never harangues, but its beauty compels us to listen. (Music, after all,is the art of manipulating sound.) It is not anti-music to play beautifully, although in these times of the vociferous "authentic" movement spokesmen, it might be politically incorrect. Being a working classical musician myself (I'm a violist), I inevitably find it wildly amusing to read protests by the so-called authentic movement. Many sound like they actually believe they are channeling past lives (and aural memory) from the eighteenth century. They conveniently forget that the Baroque Period (1600-1750) was Dionysian (and therefore "Romantic") and not Apollonian. And they very self righteously try to snooker us into believing that they alone know what a body of work stands for, as if any one human being could possibly define that for the rest of us. A body of work stands for nothing, it simply is. Art always is the sum total of the experience we bring to it, "experience" being the operative word here. Ask any old geezer musical icon what is the most important in music, and you will inevitably get the same answer: music is about concentration and it is about intention. From the point of view of rendering a satisfying performance, what is printed on the page is merely the beginning of the process -- and in the end, the least important. Read more ›
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5.0 out of 5 stars ... wort every penny May 15 2002
By A Customer
Format:Audio CD
You have at least three new good versions of this 6 Bach sonatas for violin & harpsichord out (Biondis/Allesandrini on opus 111 and Manze on Harmonia mundi) too choose from but I prefer this disc (even if Manze:s disc are more filled, with other stuff) because I like Carmignolas warm (BUT def. baroque style) and at the same time more daring, spontanious, lively fiddle play and he probably not play by that way because of the sake for it... he IS that good (no mannerism here).
This is def. a Bach 6 sonata for violin & harpsichord disc holding its strenghts for a lifetime listening.
This harpsichord is by the way also beutiful and skilful played by his counterpart Andrea Marcon who also is a baroque music expert and -in fact- is a professor of this instrument.
In those 6 Bach sonatas both instrument (viola and harpsichord) should be heard and treated equal but the viola is in sound a bit "over" Marcons harpsichord -in general (soundengineering?) but I could live with that because of Carmignolas violin.
This set is a must have for baroque lovers, music lovers in general and audophiles as well... It is not SO long (some lasting so called fillers should have been in this disc to fill it out) but it is more than well worth the money anyway so buy it with no hesitation.
I like to mention that a lot of PROFESSIONAL rewievers rank this disc extremly high in both artistic way and about sound so dont care about one star rewievs about this disc.
Stunning, great and shure... there is some other good ones too mentioned above but this is really, really good.
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Carmignola strikes again July 25 2002
By jg
Format:Audio CD
After Carmignola most excellent recording of Vivaldi Concertos I was very interested to listen to the Bach recording, since Bach is in a completely different musical world than Vivaldi, although both are nevertheless from the same style period (i.e. Baroque). Carmignola is reknown for being an excellent Baroque violinst - and indeed he is (so do not listen too much to the one star comment). Being a (after work) violinist my self I simply enjoy listening to him and his counterpart: both are engaged in a dialogue throughout the 6 sonatas, the violin being sometimes in the foreground, sometimes the harpsichord with most astonishing dynamic changes in between those two instruments and within each of the instruments. Playing lots of Vivaldi has done no harm to this Bach interpretation, it may well have put a new aspect into it. The recording is technically also excellent, presenting a very warm, very balanced full sound.
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5.0 out of 5 stars musical taste Nov. 21 2002
Format:Audio CD
I am amazed at B. Johnson's critique of this cd and of stylistically informed performances in general. Obviously, one who thinks that Isaac Stern's rendition of Bach's sonatas is the standerd to be emulated has absolutly no musical taste! Giuliano Carmignola's performance provides such a fresh and exciting interpretation to music which used to be labeled as boring and trite. Take Johnson's words with a grain of salt!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  7 reviews
26 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Carmignola strikes again July 25 2002
By jg - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
After Carmignola most excellent recording of Vivaldi Concertos I was very interested to listen to the Bach recording, since Bach is in a completely different musical world than Vivaldi, although both are nevertheless from the same style period (i.e. Baroque). Carmignola is reknown for being an excellent Baroque violinst - and indeed he is (so do not listen too much to the one star comment). Being a (after work) violinist my self I simply enjoy listening to him and his counterpart: both are engaged in a dialogue throughout the 6 sonatas, the violin being sometimes in the foreground, sometimes the harpsichord with most astonishing dynamic changes in between those two instruments and within each of the instruments. Playing lots of Vivaldi has done no harm to this Bach interpretation, it may well have put a new aspect into it. The recording is technically also excellent, presenting a very warm, very balanced full sound.
19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars ... wort every penny May 15 2002
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
You have at least three new good versions of this 6 Bach sonatas for violin & harpsichord out (Biondis/Allesandrini on opus 111 and Manze on Harmonia mundi) too choose from but I prefer this disc (even if Manze:s disc are more filled, with other stuff) because I like Carmignolas warm (BUT def. baroque style) and at the same time more daring, spontanious, lively fiddle play and he probably not play by that way because of the sake for it... he IS that good (no mannerism here).
This is def. a Bach 6 sonata for violin & harpsichord disc holding its strenghts for a lifetime listening.
This harpsichord is by the way also beutiful and skilful played by his counterpart Andrea Marcon who also is a baroque music expert and -in fact- is a professor of this instrument.
In those 6 Bach sonatas both instrument (viola and harpsichord) should be heard and treated equal but the viola is in sound a bit "over" Marcons harpsichord -in general (soundengineering?) but I could live with that because of Carmignolas violin.
This set is a must have for baroque lovers, music lovers in general and audophiles as well... It is not SO long (some lasting so called fillers should have been in this disc to fill it out) but it is more than well worth the money anyway so buy it with no hesitation.
I like to mention that a lot of PROFESSIONAL rewievers rank this disc extremly high in both artistic way and about sound so dont care about one star rewievs about this disc.
Stunning, great and shure... there is some other good ones too mentioned above but this is really, really good.
29 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bach Beautifully Played July 4 2002
By rompibai - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Giuliano Carmignola is a musician's musician. He was "discovered" by Sony when he was around the age of 50, having spent many decades in a corner of Italy quietly, calmly doing what he loves to do: playing music, considering music. We know this because we can clearly hear this in his sound. His sound never harangues, but its beauty compels us to listen. (Music, after all,is the art of manipulating sound.) It is not anti-music to play beautifully, although in these times of the vociferous "authentic" movement spokesmen, it might be politically incorrect. Being a working classical musician myself (I'm a violist), I inevitably find it wildly amusing to read protests by the so-called authentic movement. Many sound like they actually believe they are channeling past lives (and aural memory) from the eighteenth century. They conveniently forget that the Baroque Period (1600-1750) was Dionysian (and therefore "Romantic") and not Apollonian. And they very self righteously try to snooker us into believing that they alone know what a body of work stands for, as if any one human being could possibly define that for the rest of us. A body of work stands for nothing, it simply is. Art always is the sum total of the experience we bring to it, "experience" being the operative word here. Ask any old geezer musical icon what is the most important in music, and you will inevitably get the same answer: music is about concentration and it is about intention. From the point of view of rendering a satisfying performance, what is printed on the page is merely the beginning of the process -- and in the end, the least important. For unless an artist takes the printed page and then runs with it according to his own unique and inimitable experience, what is rendered sadly becomes something that a synthesizer also could have produced. I wince thinking of the enormous amount of recorded music out there that falls into this category and of the people who sigh, "I just don't like classical music." I say they just don't like performances that bring nothing to the printed page.Carmignola and Marcon bring their honest selves to the performance of this music. The pleasure of their honesty and the beauty of their sound fills this listener with immense satisfaction.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Highly Recommended Feb. 17 2009
By l'auditeur - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
It's a shame that Bach's accompanied violin sonatas are so infrequently performed. They may be the unfortunate victim of the overwhelming popularity of Bach's solo violin repertoire and concerti (and perhaps also the victim of lackluster realizations).

The first recording I found of these pieces was the Laredo/Gould set on Sony, which, despite their impeccable qualifications, left me unimpressed. This recording I bought on a whim, recalling Carmignola's fantastic Four Seasons recording, and it left me absolutely speechless. This music positively sings! There is imagination and a virile energy in Carmignola and Marcon's playing that complements Bach wonderfully - never overwhelming or compromising, but infusing an extraordinary vitality. I would have never guessed these sonatas could be so much fun!

Despite the challenges of baroque instruments, Carmignola's intonation is absolutely impeccable and Marcon's phrasing and ornamentation is superb. It ranks among the finest harpsichord performances I've heard. If you have any aversion to the instrument, as I once did, he will quickly cure it.
12 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars musical taste Nov. 21 2002
By ClassicalJoel - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
I am amazed at B. Johnson's critique of this cd and of stylistically informed performances in general. Obviously, one who thinks that Isaac Stern's rendition of Bach's sonatas is the standerd to be emulated has absolutly no musical taste! Giuliano Carmignola's performance provides such a fresh and exciting interpretation to music which used to be labeled as boring and trite. Take Johnson's words with a grain of salt!
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