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Speak & Spell Original recording remastered


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1 used from CDN$ 27.85

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (April 6 2006)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording remastered
  • Label: Mute
  • ASIN: B000EQ46F0
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #51,547 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. New Life (2006 Digital Remaster)
2. I Sometimes Wish I Was Dead (2006 Digital Remaster)
3. Puppets (2006 Digital Remaster)
4. Boys Say Go! (2006 Digital Remaster)
5. Nodisco (2006 Digital Remaster)
6. What's Your Name? (2006 Digital Remaster)
7. Photographic (2006 Digital Remaster)
8. Tora! Tora! Tora! (2006 Digital Remaster)
9. Big Muff (2006 Digital Remaster)
10. Any Second Now (Voices) (2006 Digital Remaster)
11. Just Can't Get Enough (2006 Digital Remaster)
12. Dreaming Of Me (2006 Digital Remaster)


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Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Audio CD
It's a wonderful, full of great melodies album, that kickstarted two brilliant careers of ultratalented musicians : one was soon-to-develop-new-grounds-band called Depeche Mode that changed their captain, and second was of course, the composer of this album, young prodigy Vince Clarke. Now, I read the other listeners' thoughts, that, like, cool that Clarke gone away so soon 'cause he's untalented and all. Let me tell you something: Martin Gore was a young prodigy on his own, and very soon he proved that to the whole world, developing the whole new sound in today's music. But that, of course, doesn't make Vince Clarke a less talented musician. Simply he had always more pop feeling in his music, and later he proved it with Yazoo and Erasure. And this album shines the same light: it's full with this brilliant simple minimalistic pop, "future pop" how they called it back in those days. "New Life", "What's Your Name?", "I Sometimes Wish I Was Dead" and The Hit! - "Just Can't Get Enough" are just examples of happy-pop-sound with awesome melody. "Puppets", "Big Muff", "Tora!Tora!Tora!" will take your happy mood away if you're too much happy at the time. :) But there's also darker sides - you can hear it on "Photographic", one of my favorite DM songs ever, that features such a mystic sound and such a evening-dusk-gonna-scary-you melody, that I hardly heard something close to that even with today's fully computerised electronic music, that can produce every sound in the world it seems...
My advise to everyone who simply likes good music is to buy this album, neverminding that sound is so simple and maybe even sounds ridiculous to some today's listeners. And to those who hate it, prefering post-Speak & Spell style of DM, I'd suggest to never forget the roots. Speak & Spell had to be created so we could enjoy now the wonder of Depeche Mode and talents of Martin Gore!!
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Format: Audio CD
Admittedly, this album is, superficially speaking, differently sounding than the rest of their (later) material. But make no mistake: this album adheres to the DM aesthetic in many ways. It forms its own unique niche in the history of this band. And just like all of DM's other classic albums of the mid to late '80s and early '90s, it's superbly inventive, crafted, and produced electronic pop that strives to appeal to the highest common denominator of the record buying public. As one reviewer wrote about this long ago: "DM introduce literacy into bubblegum".
Compared to DM's later efforts, the lyrical content and melodies here are pretty fluffy. But the underlying ideas here are great: Daniel Miller and the band went into the studio with the idea of creating an electronic pop album with a highly minimal Kraftwerkian aesthetic, but also with a poppy sweetness which had never been married to this style of music before. Today the album sounds equally dated and relevant; in other words, great art that not only evokes the time in which it was made but also occupies its own irreplacable spot in this history of this band and perhaps in that of music as a whole.
Some may call me crazy, but I love this album for its classic electronic minimalism a la Kraftwerk, its almost total lack of pretense, and also just for the fact that its a blast to listen to. But I would not recommend this as an introduction to the band for a first time listener as it, while certainly being very good, is neither their best nor a broad overview of Depeche Mode; instead purchase "The Singles 81-85" (which has the three singles released concurrently with "Speak & Spell"), become further acquainted with the band and only then get this album and see it in the context of their later work (and that of other innovative electronic acts of the time like Kraftwerk).
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Format: Audio CD
Yes, yes...this is not the amazing Gothy, darker Depeche that we all know and love today. But it IS a perfect set of synth-laden pop tunes that was quite groundbreaking in its day. Really good songwriting...and it paves the way for the work Vince Clarke would go on to do in Erasure. If you love the New Wave sound of the early '80s, you've got to get this one.
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By RoHLand on May 6 2004
Format: Audio CD
Yes, it's a masterpiece. It's just their debut but it already exceeds most of its successors (with the exception of Construction Time Again). I don't know why people always tell things like "Good thing that Vince Clarke left so early" and stuff, when he produced such a jewel of Britsh Synth Pop.
We have these happy-go-lucky pop songs like "Just Can't Get Enough" or "New Life", as well as thoughtful songs in minor key e.g."Puppets". And then, my 6 all time favourites, that are even better then various songs from other DM albums.
"Any Second Now(Voices)" sounds a bit like Kraftwerk and it represents Vince's sensitive side, letting Martin Gore take vocals and using the Warm Pad Synth in the (instrumental) chorus.
"I Sometimes Wish I Was Dead" (which appears on this album version) might confuse the listener a bit, as the song is not at all as gloomy as the title would suggest. But nevertheless it's great, due to the simplistic cadences (G-D-C), this leading synth melody that reappaers constantly and the march feeling produced by the moog bass synth line and the militant rythm.
Also the b-sides featured on this album version are great. Take "Icemachine". It's not that happy-go-lucky like its A-Side "Dreaming of Me", but, written in minor key, darker and also rhythmically very interesting, using clapping percussion and puff sounds which make it seem quite rebellious.
And then "Shout" is quite dark for Vince's work and not at all naive and happy. It sounds a little bit exotic according to the heavy rythm devices, and this 'evil' bass synths (modified with phaser effect) that dominates this track makes it quite dark so that the atmosphere of this song stands in contrast to its lyrics.
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