CDN$ 113.83
  • List Price: CDN$ 126.50
  • You Save: CDN$ 12.67 (10%)
Usually ships within 2 to 5 weeks.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Speech and Language Processing: An Introduction to Natural Language Processing, Computational Linguistics and Speech Recognition Library Binding – Jan 26 2000


Amazon Price New from Used from
Library Binding
"Please retry"
CDN$ 113.83
CDN$ 70.74 CDN$ 29.74

There is a newer edition of this item:


Join Amazon Student in Canada



Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Library Binding: 934 pages
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall; US ed edition (Jan. 26 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0130950696
  • ISBN-13: 978-0130950697
  • Product Dimensions: 23.4 x 17.8 x 5.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #537,876 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

By n on Nov. 5 2003
Format: Library Binding
something which I can use - I am a linguist - and found it immensly readable and useful
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Library Binding
This book helped me accomplish what I set out to do; namely to obtain an overview of the field of natural language processing, with an emphasis on language understanding (as opposed to recognition). And I can recommend it on that level. The weakness of the book however is that it left me asking, "OK, now what?". The book started off strong with a number of dynamic-programming algorithms, finite automaton models, and N-grams that one could sink his/her teeth into from an algorithmic point-of-view. But when it came to actual techniques for natural-language understanding (chapters 14-17) the goods were not delivered. The algorithms disappeared, and the best I could find was in Chapter 15 an incomplete, and unconvincing treatment of Hiyan Alshawi's semantic parsing techniques which fueled the Core Language Engine last decade. Chapter 16 dealt with lexical semantics and was almost entirely devoid of algorithms.
My gut feeling after reading this text is that parsing techniques will likely give way to statistical and probabilistic learning methods that will in some sense bypass the need to correctly or accurately parse language. I cannot fault the authors for not exploring this in more depth,as this represents the cutting edge for both NLP and artificial intelligence. In any case, I'm off to read Schutze and Manning's book which will hopefully provide a bit more focus on that perspective. What intrigues me is that most people can understand some language, but very few people understand the grammar of their own language, especially if they have been deprived of a formal education. So why should computers need to know all about grammar rules and parsing? Could they instead be trained by simply being exposed to enough interactions between language and objects? I teach in a department dominated by both foreign and immigrant students. I understand them most of the time, but I would estimate that half the time their sentences or utterances would not fail to be parsed correctly.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Library Binding
GENERAL IDEA: Broad coverage but it lacks depth and details - particularly practical details. That is, the presentation is often too sketchy, mainly because it approaches too many subjects for its available space. I would not say that this book is strong on theory either. It is quite obvious that it avoids getting too formal and rigurous, probably to remain attractive for non-specialists too.
CASE STUDY: One specific problem I had with the Hidden Markov Models, that are supperficially presented (or spread I could say) in several separate sections of the book, so it's not been a pleasure trying to actually understand them properly and completely as a fundamental concept, to make them work in my particular application.
TITLE: The book's title IS misleading because it starts with "Speeech" and this book's main subject is not speech but (written) language. Actually there are only a few chapters on speech.
CONCLUSION: Get this book if you are looking for a good overview of the field. As soon as you need in-depth coverage of some particular topic you will look for additional resources.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By A Customer on May 19 2002
Format: Library Binding
This book is a great general introduction to NLP, covering a broad range of topics. Unfortunately there are many errors in the mathematical formulae and the algorithm descriptions, so do make sure to download the errata list from the book's home page.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Library Binding
I recently had reason to return to Jurafsky and Martin's* "Speech and Language Processing" to do a little brush-up on pronunciation models. Of course, I got diverted; this time by an insightful review of the "internal structure" of words. I came away reminded of why this is perhaps the single best textbook I've ever read. "Speech and Language Processing" is always the first source I check, and it is quite often the last.
First of all, Jurafsky and Martin cover absolutely everything you need to know in order to understand the state of the art systems and to read primary sources such as journals or conference proceedings. You could teach an advanced undergraduate or graduate course by simply tackling it a chapter at a time and discussing everyone's solutions to the exercises. The book is organized by interleaving theoretical topics, such as regular expressions and automata, with practical applications, such as pronunciation modeling or pattern matching. This allows for a fast start on interesting and realistic applications while providing a solid foundation for understanding the field.
Second, the book is not only readable, it's enjoyable. The examples are clever, not cute or forced. The topics flow from one to the next in an almost seamless narrative.
Third, the book is scholarly to the point of lacing pages with references to original sources. Somehow, Jurafsky and Martin have managed to track down fascinating threads such as the development of the currently accepted statistical models for speech recognition.
Fourth, and most amazingly, Jurafsky and Martin manage all of this while maintaining a rigorous standard of definition and example that should be a model to the rest of the field. Terms are defined when they're used or cross-referenced.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Library Binding
This book is a feat for anybody interested in Natural Language Processing and probably the most comprehensive book on this subject. It provides an in-depth overview of the most important aspects of NLP from regular expressions to sense disambiguation, discourse, and machine translation. I particularly like the bibliographical and historical notes in each chapter, which provide additional historical context and lots of references.
The book is well written and carefully structured. However, it contains several silly typos (real-word errors) that are a bit embarrassing, considering the topic of the book.
This book does not cover the hardware components of speech recognition. It only provides an introduction to the computational aspects. Nevertheless, I don't think the title is misleading (as other reviewers claim), but the back-cover should mention that it doesn't cover the electronic and signal processing components of speech recognition.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Product Images from Customers

Most recent customer reviews

Search


Feedback