Auto boutiques-francophones Simple and secure cloud storage Personal Care Furniture Kindle Explore the Amazon.ca Vinyl LP Records Store NFL Tools
Spiral Staircase has been added to your Cart
+ CDN$ 3.49 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by DVDemon
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Fast shipping from Montreal!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Spiral Staircase
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
      

Spiral Staircase


Price: CDN$ 85.99 & FREE Shipping. Details
Only 1 left in stock.
Sold by raremoviefindercanada and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
5 new from CDN$ 79.98 7 used from CDN$ 17.90
Unlimited FREE Two-Day Shipping for Six Months When You Try Amazon Student


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Product Details

  • Actors: Dorothy McGuire, George Brent, Ethel Barrymore, Kent Smith, Rhonda Fleming
  • Directors: Robert Siodmak
  • Writers: Ethel Lina White, Mel Dinelli
  • Producers: Dore Schary
  • Format: Black & White, Dolby, Full Screen, NTSC, Subtitled
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, French
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: UNRATED
  • Studio: Fox Video (Canada) Limited
  • Release Date: Oct. 4 2005
  • Run Time: 83 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000AM6OOE
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #47,800 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Product Description

Amazon.ca

An unusual suspense film, The Spiral Staircase tells the story of a mute servant girl threatened by a murderer who has a penchant for killing the handicapped. Ethel Barrymore, Elsa Lanchester, and George Brent co-star, while Dorothy McGuire expertly captures the dilemma of the mute Helen Capel. Capel, who has not been able to speak since childhood, must somehow call for help before becoming the killer's next victim. McGuire's performance carries the film far past any B-movie qualities in the plot, and the last line is one of the most memorable in film history. Silent movie buffs will especially enjoy the opening scene, which takes place at a turn-of-the-century movie parlor. --Mark Savary --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jay Dickson on April 13 2004
Format: DVD
This well-remembered Gothic thriller has been re-filmed three times--once for TV in 1961 with Elizabeth Montgomery, once in 1975 with Jacqueline Bisset, and once again for TV in 2000 with Nicolette Sheridan--but the originals never quite captured the qualities of the original, which features Doroithy McGuire's best performance as a terrorized mute serving girl in a 1906 New England mansion. The script itself isn't much, and relies on very hoary melodramatic conventions that even seemed old in its day, and the script has its share of howlers (the famous last line, in particular). What makes it memorable is McGuire's very affecting performance, Robert Siodmak's remarkably chilling direction, and most of all the great Warren mansion itself--one of the most beautifully elaborate sets ever constructed for a Gothic. At times your eyes have trouble taking the entirety of the house's richly inhuman decorations in, and the killer's ability to move in and around the house with ease seems perfectly logical. (Keep a watch out for the great early sequence with Dorothy McGuire watching herself in the mirror on the landiung of the house's other, main staircase--as the killer watches her watching herself.)
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mark Norvell on Oct. 3 2002
Format: DVD
Famous 1946 version of Ethel Lina White's "Some Must Watch" about a deranged killer preying on young women with physical infirmities because they aren't "perfect". Set in the early 1900's, Helen(Dorothy McGuire) is a mute servant girl working in a spooky old house caring for a crotchety invalid(Ethel Barrymore) whose two sons are dysfunctional misfits. Everyone worries that Helen will be the next victim and they are so right for the killer is a lot closer than they think. Fine cast of character actors populate this engrossing chiller that must have scared the poop out of 40's audiences. McGuire is perfect as Helen and Barrymore is regally majestic as the old lady. Spooky music and camera shots of the killer's eyes just before he pounces keep things properly creepy. Most enjoyable and a delight for vintage movie buffs. Great presentation by Anchor bay on DVD. A keeper.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Fernando Silva on June 15 2003
Format: DVD
Splendid mystery movie, thanks to a great performance by its star, the excellent actress Dorothy McGuire, who plays a mute girl in danger (a murderer who only kills disabled women, is on the loose). McGuire works for a rich dowager, played with great skill as always, by Ethel Barrymore, who's very concerned about the girl's security, because she's almost sure that McGuire will be the next victim......what secrets does the big mansion hide?.
The cast is full of seasoned pros: George Brent, Kent Smith, a very young and beautiful Rhonda Fleming.... and special mention deserve the performances of Elsa Lanchester, as a maid with a likeness for booze...and Sara Allgood, as a stern nurse.
The film is rich in atmosphere, has an eerie quality, and an excellent camera work.
The dvd edition is good.
If you like thrillers, this one is for you.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Michael Manion on March 29 2002
Format: DVD
What a classic thriller! A young women has been mute since she was a girl - Helen, played by Dorothy McGuire. She is living in an large old house with an elderly women, played by the wonderful Ethel Barrymore and her two sons played by George Brent and Gordon Oliver. There is a young Doctor, played by Kent Smith who is looking out the Helen and is interested in helping her. There seems to have been a murder recently of a young girl. Mrs. Warren(Ethel Barrymore) seems to know a lot more then she is telling. On a dark and raining night each person in the house comes to face some under lieing fear that grips everyone eventually. The lighting is very interesting and the acting is top noch. For those of you who really enjoy the who-done-it and thriller genre this is one of the best.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By bernie TOP 50 REVIEWER on Oct. 6 2013
Format: DVD
It is a New England town in the horse and buggy era. Talkies are not in yet. For the past ten years the town has been plagued by mysterious murders. The victims seem to be physically challenged women.

As viewers we speculate on who the culprit can be. The local Constable (James Bell) has a theory that it is someone from the town and that it will be hard to detect the perpetrator.

Helen (Dorothy McGuire) is a psychological mute. Everyone tells her she is next but she is not to worry because she is being protected. Mrs. Warren (Ethel Barrymore) tells her to get out before it is too late. Professor Warren (George Brent) tells her to just get fixed. Dr. Parry (Kent Smith) says I can take you somewhere where you might get fixed; he tries a little bit of experimenting himself. Steve Warren (Gordon Oliver) says "Lever be." I think he likes silent women.

Looks like the perpetrator could be anyone is all we see is an eye and a glove.

Maybe you can guess and maybe you cannot. But in any event will be on the edge of your seat.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By EA Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on May 1 2011
Format: DVD
A thunderstorm, a gothic mansion, a young woman in peril, and an elderly lady who voices predictions of death'n'doom. "The Spiral Staircase" is a solid little horror/suspense thriller that carefully crafts its settings, as well as a feeling of claustrophobic fear -- the only problem is that it's pretty obvious who the villain is.

A small rural town is being plagued by a serial killer; he only preys on young women who are handicapped, either mentally or physically. I'll leave you to speculate on the Freudian subtext there.

So unsurprisingly people are worried about Helen, a young mute woman (although for some reason, Helen doesn't seem concerned much). Helen lives in an old gothic mansion some miles from town, working as the companion to an elderly, crabby lady who keeps uttering vague warnings of death'n'doom. Also present: an exasperated nurse, the cook and her hubby, and the old lady's son and stepson.

So when a thunderstorm hits and the old woman has an attack of... whatever she's suffering from, Helen's doctor boyfriend goes rushing off to get ether. However, someone is watching Helen from inside the house, and this person is determined to kill her before the night is out...

As a mystery, "The Spiral Staircase" is pretty flawed. Helen spends the entire movie ignoring warnings of death'n'doom from... pretty much everybody, then is apparently shocked when the serial killer goes after her. Also: it's kind of obvious from the start who the murderer is, if nothing else because all the red herrings point so strongly to the only other suspect. It would have been nice if they had made us wonder about the other characters.

But as a psychological thriller, this is a solid piece of work.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.


Feedback