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Spirit Level New Edition, The [Paperback]

Richard Wilkinson , Kate Pickett
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
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Book Description

Dec 14 2010
Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett's "The Spirit Level: Why Equality is Better for Everyone" is the most influential and talked-about book on society in the last decade - now updated with a new chapter on the controversy the book has ignited. Why do we mistrust people more in the UK than in Japan? Why do Americans have higher rates of teenage pregnancy than the French? What makes the Swedish thinner than the Australians? The answer: inequality. This groundbreaking book, based on years of research, provides hard evidence to show: How almost everything - from life expectancy to mental illness, violence to illiteracy - is affected not by how wealthy a society is, but how equal it is; that societies with a bigger gap between rich and poor are bad for everyone in them - including the well-off; how we can find positive solutions and move towards a happier, fairer future. Urgent, provocative and genuinely uplifting, "The Spirit Level" has been heralded as providing a new way of thinking about ourselves and our communities, and could change the way you see the world. "A big idea, big enough to change political thinking". ("Guardian"). "A remarkable new book ...the implications are profound". (Will Hutton, "Observer"). "The evidence is hard to dispute". ("Economist"). Richard Wilkinson studied economic history at the London School of Economics before training in epidemiology and is Professor Emeritus at the University of Nottingham Medical School and Honorary Professor at University College London. Kate Pickett is a Professor of Epidemiology at the University of York and a National Institute for Health Research Career Scientist. Her work with Richard Wilkinson on "The Spirit Level" was shortlisted for Research Project of the Year 2009 by the "Times Higher Education Supplement", and their book was chosen as one of the Top Ten Books of the Decade by the "New Statesman".

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Spirit Level New Edition, The + The Spirit Level Delusion: Fact-Checking the Left's New Theory of Everything
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Review

“Wilkinson and Pickett make an eloquent case that the income gap between a nation's richest and poorest is the most powerful indicator of a functioning and healthy society…Felicitous prose and fascinating findings make this essential reading.”—Publishers Weekly (starred)

“In this fascinating sociological study, the authors do an excellent job of presenting the research, analyzing nuances, and offering policy suggestions for creating more equal and sustainable societies. For all readers, specialized or not, with an interest in understanding the dynamics today between economic and social conditions.”—Library Journal

The Spirit Level will change the way you think about life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, especially if you live in the United States. You will reexamine what it means to be successful, how you will seek and achieve personal satisfaction, and what you owe your fellow citizen.”—Jo Perry, BookBrowse.com

“It has taken two experts from the field of public health to deliver a major study of the effects of inequality on society. Though Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett are British, their research explores the United States in depth, and their work is an important contribution to the debate our country needs.”Robert B. Reich, from the foreword

“Might be the most important book of the year.”—Guardian

“Fascinating and deeply provoking…The Spirit Level does contain a powerful political message. It is impossible to read it and not to be impressed by how often greater equality appears to be the answer, whatever happens to be the question. It provides a connection between what otherwise look like disparate social problems.”—David Runciman, London Review of Books

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Richard Wilkinson has played a formative role in international research and his work has been published in 10 languages. He studied economic history at the London School of Economics before training in epidemiology and is Professor Emeritus at the University of Nottingham Medical School and Honorary Professor at University College London. Kate Pickett is a Professor of Epidemiology at the University of York and a National Institute for Health Research Career Scientist. She studied physical anthropology at Cambridge, nutritional sciences at Cornell and epidemiology at Berkeley before spending four years as an Assistant Professor at the University of Chicago. Her work, with Richard Wilkinson, on The Spirit Level was shortlisted for Research Project of the Year 2009 by the Times Higher Education Supplement, and their book was chosen as one of the Top Ten Books of the Decade, by the New Statesman.

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Most helpful customer reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This book is very well documented. It allows us to get informed about the consequences of choices we collectively made for decades. At the same time, it shows us that health problems in America are not only medical problems that could be solved by an extended medicare system.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Important Book April 2 2013
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This is a book that every citizen should read. The "look out for yourself" attitude ultimately hurts all of us, and this book provides the data to prove it. It is unfortunate that inequality is increasing in our society.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Worth a read Jan. 4 2011
Format:Paperback
One does not have to google too deep to be convinced the authors; Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett, are active advocates for progressive causes so the uneasy feeling that the evidence presented in their book was sifted and selected to suit the author's preconceptions should not cause much surprise. Indeed, by the end of the book the authors have cast aside any pretence of being disinterested researchers. This is not to suggest their effort should be written off as political rhetoric, just that a grain or two of salt may be called for.

The bulk of the book is devoted to examining, one by one, various social ills and demonstrating they are correlated, in rich societies at least, to the degree of income inequality within the society. The greater the inequality; the worse off the society, regardless of its overall wealth. This explains, for example, why the USA, one of the world's wealthiest countries, has higher levels of mental illness, lower life expectancies and so on, than poorer countries in which income is distributed more equally than in the U.S. The results are consistent both in comparisons between selected rich countries and in comparisons between the U.S. individual states. The data presented is extensive and well documented.

It is easy to concur with the authors. After all, isn't it obvious that taking inequality to the extreme by limiting all income to one or a few individuals would be disastrous? And too, we have the example of the odious income of Wall Street bankers which has had less than ideal results. Still, some of the correlations cited are more difficult to accept as causal than others. For example, call it a gut feel but it seems likely something more than just income inequality is needed to explain high rates of obesity.
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Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This analysis of income inequality and its effects on societies worldwide is compelling. If politicians do not heed the conclusions, humanity will suffer.
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5.0 out of 5 stars How inequality is killing us Sept. 3 2013
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
If a book's value can be measured by its ability to antagonize right-wing `think-tanks,' then this book is priceless.

The Spirit Level challenges everything we've been told about why people get sick and what it takes to be healthy.

While public campaigns lecture us to eat right, stop smoking, exercise more, etc., in fact, our well-being has very little to do with our individual choices and everything to do with how society is structured. Put simply, inequality is extremely bad for our health.

The United States ranks as the world's most unequal nation, far outstripping all other nations. The top one percent of Americans have a combined net worth that is more than triple the net worth of the other 99 percent combined. And the bottom 40 percent of Americans own less than nothing, because they are sinking in debt.(1)

Wilkinson and Pickett compare income inequality within 23 of the world's richest nations and all fifty US states. They found that, at every income level, people living in more unequal nations and states suffer:

*lower life expectancy
*higher infant mortality
*more homicides
*more anxiety
*more mental illness
* more drug and alcohol addiction
* more obesity
* higher rates of imprisonment
* less social mobility
* more teen pregnancies
* more high-school dropouts
* poorer school performance
* more school-age bullying

And the extent to which people at every income level suffer these problems is directly related to how unequal is the society in which they live.

In contrast, people living in more equal societies and states enjoy better mental, physical and social health - at every income level.
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