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Spirit In The Room (Deluxe Edition)

Tom Jones Audio CD

Price: CDN$ 14.98 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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Spirit In The Room (Deluxe Edition) + Praise And Blame
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Product Details


1. Tower of Song
2. (I Want To) Come Home
3. Hit Or Miss
4. Love And Blessings
5. Soul Of A Man
6. Bad As Me
7. Dimming Of The Day
8. Traveling Shoes
9. All Blues Hail Mary
10. Charlie Darwin
11. Just Dropped In
12. Lone Pilgrim
13. When The Deal Goes Down

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.2 out of 5 stars  83 reviews
33 of 35 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Raw Tom Jones has arrived ! June 7 2012
By DAK77 - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Spirit in The Room is a great CD and is an even more honest look into the heart of Tom Jones than Praise and Blame, his last CD. I've been a TJ fan since the early 90's and liked him for many reason but his ability to take chances and be himself was the most appealing to me. This CD is the most bare bones performance that I have ever heard from him. You can tell by this CD and Praise and Blame that Tom is reflecting heavily on his faith and the events of his life. He's not too worried about keeping up with today's scene like we saw before (The Lead and How To Swing It - 1994) and he's moved on from collaborating (Reload - 1999) but some how he appeals to millions through raw talent.

The arrangements on this CD are simple, sometimes even borderline jam session but I believe the message comes across quite clear that his soul is the centerpiece of this entire work. Don't look for many uptempo numbers on here, he gets to mid-tempo on a few but many numbers such as All Blues Hail Mary are mellow with light percussion or no percussion such as in Charlie Darwin and maybe some simple riffs heard in I Want To Come Home.

Overall I love this CD for it's honesty. Artists like Jones have earned the right to bare their soul in a music industry that no longer embraces creativity. TJ is old skool. Using the incredible baritone that God gave him to tell the world what is on his mind. I was skeptical about Jones' search for meaning in life when I first heard Praise and Blame but he's confirmed to me that he has matured 110% as an artist (though still reaching and growing).
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Album of the Year? May 2 2013
By Mark D. Prouse - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
For a long time fan of Tom Jones, the Tom Jones most people know, the sexy, swaggering swinger, the belter of R&B classics and corny country ballads, the bigger than life crooner of movie themes and Las Vegas show stoppers, this new CD represented a challenge, one I wasn't sure I wanted to approach ... except I had heard him stretch his wings and venture into new directions before, and usually with great success (listen to his "Goin' Down Slow," and "Love Letters," featured on the Mike Figgis-directed segment of the TV documentary, The Blues (Martin Scorsese Presents Red, White and Blues). Not really crazy about the samples I heard from another recent Tom Jones effort, Praise & Blame, I wasn't too excited to learn there was more from a great voice whose star I thought was surely on the descent. Then someone sent me a link to a video of Jones doing Leonard Cohen's "Tower of Song," and I was mesmerized. Here was a great, crowd pleasing entertainer who had somehow crossed over into a higher level of artistry. Don't take my word for it, and don't just dismiss him after hearing a few samples here on Amazon. This is deep, soulful music, sung by a voice like no other, with lyrics clearly understood and communicated. And the song choices! Odetta's overlooked, magnificent "Hit Or Miss," from a long out-of-print album of then-contemporary folk songs, gets an inspired, fresh delivery. Richard Thompson's oft-covered "Dimming Of The Day" is sung with the urgency of a man who knows he's on the final leg of his path to glory. Blind Willie Johnson's "Soul Of A Man" sounds like it could have been recorded any time in the last sixty years by a blues master of any color, and is yet, unmistakably, Tom Jones. "Just Dropped In" is, appropriately, a psychedelic-blues outing that makes no attempt at duplicating the Kenny Rogers original while honoring it faithfully. Then there's the Low Anthem spine tingler, "Charlie Darwin," a completely unexpected and wonderful surprise, backed by a heavenly choir. Jones closes with a haunting rendition of Bob Dylan's "When The Deal Goes Down." The spare arrangement fades out on a vibrating echo that left me thinking, "woah! What just happened here?" I say, Sir Thomas John Woodward, OBE, in his winter white years, has topped himself and delivered an instant classic, and it's not his singing alone that makes this latest adventure reach its intended destination - it's the funky, dark-toned playing of all the supporting musicians, most notably the guitar and percussion work of producer Ethan Johns. There's not a false note here; the entire performance from start to finish is intense yet understated, becoming all the more powerful for its restraint, the impeccable song selection and even the sequencing. So far, this is my Album of the Year for 2013!
14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Soulful interpretations (4 and 1/2 stars) July 26 2012
By TheNoomz83 - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
Other than the Southern gospel-blues of Blind Willie Johnson ("Soul of a Man"/1930) and the traditional gospel of "Travelin' Shoes" (associated with Vera Ward Hall in the '30s), which seem like overflow material from his previous "Praise & Blame" album (2010--also produced by Ethan Johns), "Spirit in the Room" is a dual-era singer-songwriter covers album. Three of the covered songs (by Odetta, Richard & Linda Thompson, and Leonard Cohen) are from the 1970s and 1980s, while the other five (by Paul McCartney, Paul Simon, Tom Waits, Joe Henry and Low Anthem) go back no further than three years. While I find that his stunningly powerful take on "Soul of a Man" blows everything else away here (Jones is now clearly among the greatest living deep southern soul-blues singers on the planet, no matter that he hails from Wales), he is solidly soulful on everything else. I would even venture to add that all but three of the eight modern-era songs are, to one degree or another, improved by the Jones/Johns pairing of vocals and production values. Ironically, the two that are least up to the originals are two of the finer efforts here: "Tower of Song" and "Hit Or Miss." It's just that Leonard Cohen and Odetta operate on another plane and can't be touched. Jones will have to settle for the second-best versions of these songs that one is likely to encounter. I would rate his "Dimming of the Day" a dead heat with Richard & Linda Thompson (not that there is any kind of contest afoot); both are soberingly affecting. The best of the rest is easily the hauntingly apocalyptic final (as it would have to be!) track, "Charlie Darwin" (the Low Anthem cover). Jones deserves special credit for making Tom Waits listenable ("Bad As Me"), Paul McCartney more down home (on "Come Home"), and above all for injecting some passion and soul into Paul Simon's simpering "Love and Blessings" from last year. The song choice on "Spirit in the Room" is just south of four-star, but the overall execution verges on five-star.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not what I thought May 20 2013
By Sandy Piksa - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
I love Tom Jones and a have a all his albums, but mostly like his older songs, but this wasn't bad, just a new sound for him. I had heard he liked blues and was going to start singing more of it. The more I listen to the album I'm sure I will like it better. Really in my opinion Tom can't do wrong. Loved him for many many years.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Raw and Earthy April 24 2013
By Shimal - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Imagine you're sitting in a little dive and you've just watched the band go off on break. Your buddy hands you a brew and you take a big drink. then he nudges the guy next to him and says "I hear you've got some new numbers. Lets hear a few." So, one of the guys sits down at the drums and starts a clean beat. Then the guitar player chimes in with clear, clean back-up. And that guy opens his mouth and starts to sing - raw, earthy tones that are just a bit world-weary and that are accented just right by the spare music backing him. That's "Spirit in the Room." If you're looking for lush orchestration, multiple back-up singers and pop lyrics, then this CD is not for you. Tom Jones voice is perfect for these tracks and he's forgotten more about phrasing than most singers ever learn. Its incredible.

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