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Spring (Rm) Original recording remastered


Price: CDN$ 14.97 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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Frequently Bought Together

Spring (Rm) + Life Time (W/Slipcase)
Price For Both: CDN$ 36.89


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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Feb. 24 2009)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording remastered
  • Label: Blue Note Records
  • ASIN: B001PCJFZS
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #67,925 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Extras (Rudy Van Gelder Edition) (2009 Digital Remaster)
2. Echo (Rudy Van Gelder Edition) (2009 Digital Remaster)
3. From Before (Rudy Van Gelder Edition) (2009 Digital Remaster)
4. Love Song (Rudy Van Gelder Edition) (2009 Digital Remaster)
5. Tee (Rudy Van Gelder Edition) (2009 Digital Remaster)

Product Description

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 2 1999
Format: Audio CD
this album from the mid-sixties when mr. williams was still a teenager, reveals his immense talent as a drummer and the driving engine of a jazz ensemble. this album greatly reflects mr. williams work with the then peak quintet in jazz (miles davis, wayne shorter, herbie hancock, ron carter, and williams). the feel is the same modalism that was working magic on albums such as esp, miles smiles, and the sorcerer with davis. the real joy here is hearing sam rivers and shorter together. the two sax men trade some exquisite solos in this set. particularly noteworthy are the longest tracks , extras and tee. the length allows for some great soloing by all the major players worth hearing over and over again. the addition of rivers and bassist gary peacock add an "out" feel to the proceedings, but once again mr. williams proves himself a master of control even when pushing the limits. a truly great album.
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By W. Peters on Feb. 15 2010
Format: Audio CD
I like some jazz, but I can't relate to this.

5 tracks, track 2 is all drums

From the credits:
originally recorded in 1966, remastered 2008

Wayne Shorter & Sam Rivers: tenor saxophones
Herbie Hancock: piano
Gary Peacock: bass
Tony Williams: drums
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Micah Newman on May 16 2003
Format: Audio CD
I got turned on to Tony Williams via his incredibly expansive and ear-stretching work with the 60's Miles Davis Quintet. I'll buy anything with him on it, although I've since learned that his best work was with Miles Davis. On _Spring_, Tony's second LP as a leader, he largely sticks to brushes, and even when he doesn't, he sounds as though he is. The tempos are fairly brisk and the drum work still plenty impressive, but his playing is surprisingly quiet most of the way through this album.
Most of _Spring_ consists of interesting free-but-not-exactly-dissonant sketches with varying instrumentation. The opening "Extras" is a double-tenor affair with Sam Rivers and Wayne Shorter twisting and colliding off one another, Gary Peacock's intuitive and quick-minded bass work, Tony backing them up, and no piano. As is typical with all the music on this LP, it sounds like the musicians are really intently listening to one another. It's an intimate setting, one in which you can actually hear the sax players' pads popping. "Echo" is a 5-minute drum solo in which Tony runs through various understated rhythmic ideas in a fairly systematic way. Herbie Hancock joins in on piano for the rest of the tracks, the most overtly tuneful of which is "Love Song", which features Sam Rivers.
This album makes for interesting listening, but it's not quite as satisfying or cohesive as certain other free-but-not-quite-dissonant works such as Herbie Hancock's "The Egg" and "The Collector" (the latter of which is on the CD reissue of Wayne Shorter's _Adam's Apple_). Still, it's a worthy and fairly impressive effort.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Caponsacchi on June 23 2002
Format: Audio CD
Miles' second "great quintet" sans Miles lacks cohesion, focus, purpose, at least on this outing. The "compositions" seem to be titles manufactured after the fact as a way of providing dividers to the free-form meanderings that took place while the tape was running. There are a few sparks created by Rivers and Shorter on the first couple of tracks, but the rest of the album is curiously unengaging. Peacock's unfaltering walking bass lines provide coherence and civility, but this would hardly seem to be the occasion for exercising politeness. And for a Van Gelder-engineered session, Williams' cymbals are surprisingly subdued in the total mix.
If you're a musician, hearing a session like this makes you wish you were taking part in it. I'm more impressed by recordings that "scare" me back into the practice room.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Autonomeus on June 11 2001
Format: Audio CD
This is an astounding recording, from August 1965, with teen sensation Tony Williams on drums and composer of all 5 pieces. It's a great example of 60s Blue Note -- not outside, but spare and angular, moving orthogonally away from straight bop. Williams had been mentored by Sam Rivers in Boston from the time he was in double-digits, and when he made it big with Miles, he brought Rivers along on his first solo dates. Personally I don't think the first, "Life Time," ever catches fire, but this one is a different story. Rivers, already over 40 by the time of this session, and Wayne Shorter, who had jumped from Art Blakey to Miles, are a terrific combination here. Herbie Hancock comes along from Miles' band, and Gary Peacock is more than authoritative on bass. "Echo" is a Williams solo, and "Love Song" is a beautiful waltz-time vehicle for Rivers -- the other 3 tracks all feature both Rivers and Shorter. "Extras" and "Tee" alone would make "Spring" well worth hearing! Check it out!
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