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Star Trek: The Next Generation - Season 6

4.3 out of 5 stars 29 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Actors: Patrick Stewart, Brent Spiner, Colm Meaney, Denise Crosby, Jonathan Frakes
  • Directors: Jonathan Frakes, LeVar Burton, Adam Nimoy, Alexander Singer, Cliff Bole
  • Format: Box set, Closed-captioned, Color, Dolby, DVD-Video, Full Screen, Subtitled, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 7
  • MPAA Rating: NR
  • Studio: Star Trek
  • Release Date: Dec 3 2002
  • Run Time: 1177 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 29 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B000063V8U
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #43,874 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)
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Product Description

Product Description

26 episodes on 7 discs: Time's Arrow Part II, Realm of Fear, Man of the People, Relics, Schisms, True-Q, Rascals, A Fistful of Datas, The Quality of Life, Chain of Command Part I, Chain of Command Part II, Ship in a Bottle, Aquiel, Face of the Enemy, Tapestry, Birthright Part I, Birthright Part II, Starship Mine, Lessons, The Chase, Frame of Mind, Suspicions, Rightful Heir, Second Chances, Timescape, Descent Part I.

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As the sixth season of Star Trek: The Next Generation went into production, everyone knew that attentions would soon be permanently divided by the debut of Deep Space Nine. Sure enough, that meant crossovers ("Birthright"), guest stars, and references back and forth. The sense of baton-passing drew the TNG family closer, however. Directorial debuts begun in season 5 allowed for repeat group-huddle ownership of several shows. Jonathan Frakes bettered "The Quality of Life" by "The Chase," which finally offered an explanation why most races in the Trek universe are humanoid with knobbly foreheads. Patrick Stewart crowbarred a Western into the franchise in "A Fistful of Datas." LeVar Burton introduced the far more exciting Riker clone Thomas in "Second Chances." But here we still find an inability to follow through a good idea, since it was intended for the clone Tom to replace the real Will. Barclay outstayed his welcome with a lackluster "Ship in a Bottle" (despite a hammy cameo from Stephanie Beacham) after he'd injected creepiness into "Realm of Fear." The same happened with Q and the painfully weak "True Q" contrasted by the philosophically challenging "Tapestry," in which Picard faced the decisions of his youth.

Yet ultimately the year provided more memorable moments than either year 5 did or year 7 would. There was the fun of a pint-sized Starfleet in "Rascals," the shocking comment on political torture in "Chain of Command," the endless Matrix-like guessing game of reality in "Frame of Mind," and even a jokey genre nod often called "Die Hard Picard" instead of its official title, "Starship Mine." The two biggest attention-drawing moments came via stellar cameos. There was the bittersweet sight of James Doohan revisiting the original Enterprise bridge on "Relics," then a quick contribution by Stephen Hawking in the cliffhanger "Descent." Both were attempts at keeping TNG the connoisseur's Trek incarnation of choice. --Paul Tonks

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
The sixth season of this marvelous series in my opinion is the best overall, well rounded season of the entire seven year run. It is loaded with exceptional, thought provoking and heart warming episodes that resound of exceptional script writing and superb performances by the primary and guest actors. From the season opener to the closer, few episodes fall out of the "superb" category! This season is another marvelous example of Gene Roddenberry's vision.
A brief synopsis of the "stand out" episodes of this particularly great season:
Relics - This superb episode is one of the most treasured episodes of the season as Scotty makes an appearance in the twenty fourth century and is befriended by the crew of the current Enterprise.
True Q - This is another great Q episode where John de Lancie makes his first of two sixth season appearances as Q. Amanda Rogers, a young honor student is aboard the Enterprise and she is beginning to display some "Q" powers.
Rascals - This is another one of the exceptional episodes of the season where a transporter accident turns Picard, Guinan, Ro Laren and Keiko O'Brien into children. Not longer after this "accident," Ferengi end up in control of the ship. Picard and the other "rascals" must find a way to regain control of the Enterprise.
A Fistful of Datas - Star Trek meets the old west in a hilarious and quite memorable episode. Alexander convinces his father to join him on the holodeck in an "ancient" western. Unfortunately the holodeck safeties become defective when Data performs an experiment that goes awry and he becomes integrated with the holodeck, putting Worf, Troi and Alexander in danger.
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Format: DVD
In the sixth season, Star Trek: The Next Generation decided to go off in some new directions and new ideas. The season opens with the conclusion of the cliffhanger Time's Arrow. The second adventure is better than the first...a great way to finish the story. We revert again back to the Original series a bit with "Relics" which contains James Doohan guest starring as "Scotty". Humor came through in "A Fistful of Datas" and we saw Patrick Stewart give arguably his best performance of the series in "Chain of Command". The sixth season contains my personal favorite sequence of the series which is Data's dream sequence in "Birthright, Part I". I think the sixth season was when Star Trek: The Next Generation was at its best. It was the climax of the entire show. It ends with Descent...probably the best cliffhanger since "The Best of Both Worlds".
Personal Favorite Episodes:
Time's Arrow: Part II, Relics, Schisms, True Q, Rascals, A Fistful of Datas, Chain of Command: Parts I and II, Face of the Enemy, Tapestry, Birthright, Part I, Starship Mine, The Chase, Frame of Mind, Timescape, and Descent: Part I
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Format: DVD
One of the neatest things about these DVD sets are the documentaries. I haven't mentioned them in my reviews up to this point and that is a failure on my part. I mention them now because I was somewhat disappointed in the sixth season extras as opposed to the extras on the previous five box sets. I'm only grumbling because the bonus material included a trailer for DS9, which is not my favorite Trek series. It also contained a trailer for Star Trek Nemesis. Obviously it was meant to be viewed before the movie came out, but I've already seen the movie and was angry that Paramount wasted good DVD space on a trailer for such a mediocre movie. Still, the profile on Data was great and as always, its nice to see the insights that the writers, directors and producers give us into the episodes. In one of the documentaries, someone mentioned that the sixth season of TNG was their best season ever. I disagree with this assertion. I've always championed seasons three and four as being top quality. Still, the sixth season delivered consistently superior drama and contained fewer clunkers than did the fifth season. We started out with the worst of the two-parters, "Time's Arrow," and continued with the mediocre, "Realm of Fear," but after that, the season took off with the arrival of Scotty. It was a delight to see Spock make his appearance and it was equally fun for me as an original series fan to see Scotty again in the episode, "Relics." It was also nostalgic to see the old Enterprise bridge. Q makes two appearances in this season in, "True Q," and "Tapestry." In the former, we get to see a slightly softer side of Q as he tries to mentor a young girl who discovers she has the power of the Q.Read more ›
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Format: DVD
Usually most television series are on their last legs by their next to last season. This wasn't the case with TNG. In fact, the writing/producing/directing/performing team seemed to have caught their second wind by season six--certainly one of their finest offerings.
I've read lots of complains about Time's Arrow (part 2). I found it to be a refreshing episode of the series--it did recall the flavor of Harlan Ellison's City on the Edge of Forever (more than the Roddenberry-Coon-Fontana rewrite). Adding Samuel Clemens (aka Mark Twain) to the mix was inspired.
While True Q didn't have the bite of most episodes involving Q, it still gave John De Lancie a chance to shine. It really wasn't about Q per se anyway. He was just a bystander in this case witnessing someone else's use of their Q power.
The real stand out episodes was the two part Chain of Command. The interaction between Patrick Stewart as Picard and David Warner as his torturer was riveting. One of Stewart's finest performances is featured in this great episode. In reality, it would actually have been a better season cliff hanger than Descent. I'd also like to praise Ronnie Cox and Jonathan Frakes for their performances as well; the two stories were well tailored and paralleled the changes within each character.
Quality of Life, Aquiel, Face of the Enemy, Ship in a Bottle (which resurrects Dr. Morarity from season 2), Tapestry and The Chase are all stand out episodes. Aquiel is a brilliant character study as well as a look at the effects of loss on the individual. It's a stunning episode that reaches to the heart of humanity--even in a powerful alien spieces.
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