• List Price: CDN$ 36.95
  • You Save: CDN$ 7.39 (20%)
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
State Of Fear has been added to your Cart
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This book is in very good condition and will be shipped within 24 hours of ordering. The cover may have some limited signs of wear but the pages are clean, intact and the spine remains undamaged. This book has clearly been well maintained and looked after thus far. Money back guarantee if you are not satisfied. See more of our deals.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

State Of Fear Hardcover – Dec 7 2004


See all 27 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 29.56
CDN$ 7.20 CDN$ 0.78

Best Canadian Books of 2014
Margaret Atwood's stunning new collection of stories, Stone Mattress, is our #1 Canadian pick for 2014. See all

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought



Product Details

  • Hardcover: 624 pages
  • Publisher: Harper; 1 edition (Dec 7 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0066214130
  • ISBN-13: 978-0066214139
  • Product Dimensions: 15.6 x 3.6 x 22.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #332,075 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Amazon

Amazon Exclusive Content

A Michael Crichton Timeline
Amazon.com reveals a few facts about the "father of the techno-thriller."

1942: John Michael Crichton is born in Chicago, Illinois, on Oct. 23.

1960: Crichton graduates from Roslyn High School on Long Island, New York, with high marks and a reputation as a star basketball player. He decides to attend Harvard University to study English. During his studies, he rankles under his writing professors’ criticism. As an act of rebellion, Crichton submits an essay by George Orwell as his own. The professor doesn’t catch the plagiarism and gives Orwell a B-. This experience convinces Crichton to change his field of study to anthropology.

1964: Crichton graduates summa cum laude from Harvard University in anthropology. After studying further as a visiting lecturer at Cambridge University and receiving the Henry Russell Shaw Travelling Fellowship, which allowed him to travel in Europe and North Africa, Crichton begins coursework at the Harvard School of Medicine. To help fund his medical endeavors, he writes spy thrillers under several pen names. One of these works, A Case of Need, wins the 1968 Mystery Writers of America's Edgar Allan Poe Award.

1969: Crichton graduates from Harvard Medical school and is accepted as a post-doctoral fellow at the Salk Institute for Biological Science in La Jolla, Calif. However, his career in medicine is waylaid by the publication of the first novel under his own name, The Andromeda Strain. The novel, about an apocalyptic plague, climbs high on bestseller lists and is later made into a popular film. Crichton said of his decision to pursue writing full time: “To quit medicine to become a writer struck most people like quitting the Supreme Court to become a bail bondsman.”

1972: Crichton's second novel under his own name The Terminal Man, is published. Also, two of Crichton's previous works under his pen names, Dealing and A Case of Need are made into movies. After watching the filming, Crichton decides to try his hand at directing. He will eventually direct seven films including the 1973 science-fiction hit Westworld, which was the first film ever to use computer-generated effects.

1980: Crichton draws on his anthropology background and fascination with new technology to create Congo, a best-selling novel about a search for industrial diamonds and a new race of gorillas. The novel, patterned after the adventure writings of H. Ryder Haggard, updates the genre with the inclusion of high-tech gadgets that, although may seem quaint 20 years later, serve to set Crichton's work apart and he begins to cement his reputation as “the father of the techno-thriller.”

1990: After the 1980s, which saw the publication of the underwater adventure Sphere (1987) and an invitation to become a visiting writer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1988), Crichton begins the new decade with a bang via the publication of his most popular novel, Jurassic Park. The book is a powerful example of Crichton's use of science and technology as the bedrock for his work. Heady discussion of genetic engineering, chaos theory, and paleontology run throughout the tightly-wound thriller that strands a crew of scientists on an island populated by cloned dinosaurs run amok. The novel inspires the 1993 Steven Spielberg film, and together book and film will re-ignite the world’s fascination with dinosaurs.

1995: Crichton resurrects an idea from his medical school days to create the Emmy-Award Winning television series ER. In this year, ER won eight Emmys and Crichton received an award from the Producers Guild of America in the category of outstanding multi-episodic series. Set in an insanely busy an often dangerous Chicago emergency room, the fast-paced drama is defined by Crichton's now trademark use of technical expertise and insider jargon. The year also saw the publication of The Lost World returning readers to the dinosaur-infested island.

2000: In recognition for Crichton's contribution in popularizing paleontology, a dinosaur discovered in southern China is named after him. "Crichton's ankylosaur" is a small, armored plant-eating dinosaur that dates to the early Jurassic Period, about 180 million years ago. "For a person like me, this is much better than an Academy Award," Crichton said of the honor.

2005: Crichton’s newest thriller State of Fear is published.




Amazon.com's Significant Seven

Michael Crichton kindly agreed to take the life quiz we like to give to all our authors: the Amazon.com Significant Seven.

Q: What book has had the most significant impact on your life?

A: Prisoners of Childhood by Alice Miller

Q: You are stranded on a desert island with only one book, one CD, and one DVD--what are they?

A: Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu (Witter Bynner version)

Symphony #2 in D Major by Johannes Brahms (Georg Solti)

Ikiru by Akira Kurosawa

Q: What is the worst lie you've ever told?

A: Surely you're joking.

Q: Describe the perfect writing environment.

A: Small room. Shades down. No daylight. No disturbances. Macintosh with a big screen. Plenty of coffee. Quiet.

Q: If you could write your own epitaph, what would it say?

A: I don't want an epitaph. If forced, I would say "Why Are You Here? Go Live Your Life."

Q: Who is the one person living or dead that you would like to have dinner with?

A: Benjamin Franklin

Q: If you could have one superpower what would it be?

A: Invisibility

From Publishers Weekly

If Crichton is right–if the scientific evidence for global warming is thin; if the environmental movement, ignoring science, has gone off track; if we live in what he in his Author’s Message calls a "State of Fear," a "near-hysterical preoccupation with safety that’s at best a waste of resources and a crimp on the human spirit, and at worst an invitation to totalitarianism"–then his extraordinary new thriller may in time be viewed as a landmark publication, both cautionary and prophetic. If he is wrong, then the novel will be remembered simply as another smart and robust, albeit preachy, addition to an astonishing writing career that has produced, among other works, Jurassic Park, Rising Sun, Disclosure and The Andromeda Strain. Crichton dramatizes his message by way of a frantic chase to prevent environmental terrorists from wreaking widespread destruction aimed at galvanizing the world against global warming. A team lead by MIT scientist/federal agent John Kenner crosses the globe to prevent the terrorists from calving a giant Antarctic iceberg; inducing terrible storms and flash floods in the US; and, using giant cavitators, causing a Pacific tidal wave. Behind the terrorists lurks the fantatical, fund-seeking chief of a mainstream environmental group; on Kenner’s team, most notably, is young attorney Peter Evans, aka everyman, whose typically liberal views on global warming chill as Kenner instructs him in the truth about the so-called crisis. The novel is dense with cliffhangers and chases and derring-do, while stuffed between these, mostly via Kenner’s dialogue, is a talky yet highly provocative survey of how Crichton thinks environmentalism has derailed. There are plenty of ready-to-film minor characters as well, from a karate-kicking beauty to a dimwitted, pro-environmentalist TV star who meets one of the nastiest fates in recent fiction. There’s a lot of message here, but fortunately Crichton knows how to write a thriller of cyclonic speed and intensity. Certainly one of the more unusual novels of the year for its high-level mix of education and entertainment, with a decidedly daring contrarian take, this take-no-prisoners consideration of environmentalism wrapped in extravagantly enjoyable pages is one of the most memorable novels of the year and is bound to be a #1 bestseller.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
In the darkness, he touched her arm and said, "Stay here." Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on July 15 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book reminded me very much of Moby Dick with its heavy emphasis on both an adventure story and sharing detailed information. Those who prefer one aspect or the other will probably find themselves flipping quickly through the pages that emphasize the other aspect.

Popular opinions are almost always wrong. That's the theme of this book. The point is made in the context of describing how global warming, as perceived by the public and media, is different from what scientists are describing. Dr. Crichton argues through his story that we can waste a lot of time and resources on popular delusions, and we need to get our facts right. His appendix I on the dangers of politicized science is something everyone should read. The eugenics example is a chilling one.

The adventure story itself is a Frederick Forsyth/Clive Cussler-type thriller written from the perspective of a young lawyer who tags along with a James Bond-like character who single-handedly saves the day along with his trusty, almost silent, sidekick. They are about as good a source for scintillating conversation as the Lone Ranger and Tonto. Instead of greedy multinationals or rich megalomaniacs being at fault, this story looks at how lawyers and rabid environmentalists can get carried away.

In typical Michael Crichton fashion, the story develops around little-known scientific facts about how humans can influence the environment. So if you wanted to know more about how giant ice bergs, tsunamis and flash floods can be created, this is your book. At the same time, there are nice subplots around how to track terrorists via the Internet and an obscure way to assassinate people.

I found myself drawn to both the adventure story and the global warming information.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By David Dent on April 10 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Author Michael Crichton has made his mark dealing with the `what-if' scenarios of science. State of Fear is different.

This is a book about political science, and the politicization of science. While the specific issue is climate change, the more general one is the power of media in shaping public opinion. Interestingly, the book shows that both the left and right manipulate media to sway public opinion. Media are portrayed as unwitting dupes of interest groups, politicians, and public relations specialists, because of mindless parroting of press releases from seemingly reputable organizations and experts.

Through his protagonist, Crichton challenges the conventional media wisdom of human influence on climate change. While he may or may not agree with the position of any of the book's characters, Crichton cautions us all to read, watch and listen with a critical mind, because politicized science is dangerous.

Indeed, Crichton , in a speech at California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, January 17, 2003, likened the current climate change juggernaut as pseudo science, similar to the eugenics movement, the search for extraterrestrial intelligence SETI, and a nuclear winter.

Highly recommended.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Bob Crandle on Dec 30 2004
Format: Hardcover
First off, this book is typical Crichton, a fun thriller, with good characters and great pacing. It seems most of reviewers of this book agree on that. There is a controversy concerning the science and Mr. Crichton's stance on the subject of global warming. I am not sure myself on this issue, but the author does give the reader plenty to think about. For me personally I see both sides, how can man not be having an effect on the enviornment including weather? but how can we even pretend to know what this effect will be? We can't even predict next weeks weather. I also know that over the last 500,000 thousand years or so the earth has had cyclical periods of warmer and colder weather (ever hear of the ice age? in fact some theories suggest we are still in the ice age just a warmer interglacial period). How are we to be able to predict just what the effect of man will be? when I was a kid a remember the fear was that the earth was heading into the next ice age? I am not saying that we shouldn't study the forces that effect climate, but I think a person has to try and think logically about all this and try and learn from all sources. Enjoy this book, and open your mind to the issues. I also recomend "A TOURIST IN THE YUCATAN" cool arceological thriller!
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Nov. 27 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I am a huge fan of Michael Crichton and own and love every single one of his books. But this book fell flat for me. I think character development is critical to any book. Most of the main characters were entirely two-dimensional and therefore no empathy could be created. I think the author jumped on a topical bandwagon and coupled it with a fantastical and literally unbelievable plot line. Moreover, although Mr Crichton is always thorough in his research, I think it was a little over the top. At times, it was more like reading a university paper with all the endless footnotes for his scientific references. A huge disappointment.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By sedgewick on Jan. 28 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Having heard about the contrarian views regarding climate change espoused in this book, I hoped to find an interesting dialogue in the form of a novel. What a disappointment!

To begin with, the plot and its execution strain credulity in this security conscious post 9/11 world. In one instance for example, we are expected to believe that a large number of school and community groups would go camping, all at the same time and all in the same specific area, after having received funding for it from charities unknown to any of them. Nobody would have become suspicious? There is a lot more of that sort, but I won't go into it.

Then there are the flat, cardboard characters more suitable for comics pages than a book that professes to address a serious subject. Evans, one of the main players and a lawyer, shines through his ignorance on almost anything, but especially the stuff he should know, considering who his client is. Yet, he gets himself out of tight spots that would even challenge the legendary James Bond.

Further the style: Too much idle conversation to fill pages, interspersed with rough language to give the appearance of toughness. The headings of the chapters - place, time and date - are supposed to indicate a fast pace, but it doesn't work. The whole thing reads more like an ill-defined draft for a movie script.

Lastly, and most importantly, the arguments: If not outright flawed, they are at best presented in tabloid manner. At one point for example, (page 402 of the hard cover edition), after hearing someone stating that global warming could mean insect infestations, which could kill whole forests, Jennifer asks Evans, her colleague, "Do you really believe this sxxx?
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most recent customer reviews



Feedback