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Stayin' Safe: The Art and Science of Riding Really Well Hardcover – Jun 15 2008


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Stayin' Safe: The Art and Science of Riding Really Well + The Upper Half of the Motorcycle: On the Unity of Rider and Machine
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Whitehorse Press (June 15 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1884313728
  • ISBN-13: 978-1884313721
  • Product Dimensions: 15.9 x 3.2 x 23.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 635 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #398,889 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Peter Tamblyn is an instructor with Larry Grodsky's Stayin' Safe Motorcycle Training.
Larry Grodsky's passion for motorcycling began in college and eventually led him to become a MSF instructor and the Safety Editor with Rider magazine, for whom he wrote more than 200 monthly columns. He eventually founded his own teaching program, Stayin' Safe, which uses road rides (rather than training ranges) to better learn the riding skills needed in real life situations.Pete Tamblyn is an instructor with Larry Grodsky's Stayin' Safe Motorcycle Training.

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Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jimmy Fairchild on Jan. 1 2010
Format: Hardcover
This is a collection of his columns, with very brief personal introductions for each from one of his many his friends and colleagues. Once I'd read the first one, I had a hard time putting the book down, and I was truly saddened when I finished the book.

Every word that Larry typed resonated in my motorcyclist's mind. Through his very readable and entertaining style he posed concepts and considerations every motorcyclist should consider each time they fire up their machine.

This book should rate with the very best of the many motorcycling books out there, from 'Zen and the art of...' to the many manuals of skills and attitudes related to motorcycling.

Buy it, read it, then re-read it every year. You'll love every column, every time.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Buy it. His columns are so enlightening and human. A man who laid down the foundation of being safe. A must read!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 19 reviews
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
Not great May 23 2008
By Larry Newman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Compared with David Hough's book, or the MSF 2nd edition, this comes off poorly. The writing style is dense and cutesey. The advice, if you can wade through the prose, is valuable, but is presented [ with illustrations] much better elsewhere.
One can only hope that Larry's Stayin' Safe Motorcycle training course is where he really shone - this book is intended as a memorial, but would have been more effective to have some of the course details thrown in.
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June '08 - I'm used to being wrong, occasionally --- but this time I was way off base !

It was when I gave the other two above mentioned books to a friend who is a new rider. I was left with Larry's book, and started reading it, by default, reluctantly.

The guy has really grown on me...the humor, the admission that he is not the world's greatest rider, his being another Larry, and sadly, hitting a deer - all of which we share, except that I walked, o.k., hobbled, away from the incident, and he did not.

Now, having replaced the gifted books in my library, I turn to Larry's collection of his columns for the humanity that leaps off the page, and the advice that just may let me get through another ride...safely.

Lots more stars...
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Great information not found elsewhere Nov. 24 2008
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
The late Lawrence Grodsky wrote for magazines about motorcycles and safety. His book contains information not found elsewhere, including the Motorcycle Safety Foundation publications. His style is extremely readable, and easily understood. He did not avoid the potential safety issues, but rather brought them to light for examination. Most chapters contain introductions by his friends from the cycling world, which are valuable in their own right. It is unfortunate that we lost Larry, who gave so much and had much more to give. I highly recommend this book to those who might be considering biking, as well as greatly experienced riders.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
A Good Read on Safety, But Not the Best Nov. 5 2012
By John E. Lincoln - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I enjoy all the books written on motorcycle safety. However, there are others that I feel are much better. This book deals more with the general aspects of safe riding, whereas those by Hough, Code, Parks, Hahn, et al, get into the specifics, with diagrams, pictures and similar, as well as specific exercises. One interesting point is this book supplies the only discussion of the downside of full face and modular helmets and the neck in accidents, a consideration I've not seen in other MC safety books. Sadly, the author died in an MC accident in Texas, hitting a deer at speed, something he apparently always considered a possibility. If you want a generalized "stream of consciousness" style of safety discussion, this is a good read. But if you're looking for some more pointed, constructive advice, and don't have any other books on MC safety, I'd recommend Hough's two books on "Proficient Motorcycling" first, and the MSF's "Motorcycling Excellence" textbook next.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Something all motorcycle owners should have. Aug. 17 2008
By Martin D. Melville - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I'd say at least 75% of motorcycle riders should have this book, as Grodsky here touches on a lot of points that most riders have mistakes in or fail to take into consideration (like proper motorcycle wear!) So far, a few of his tips I've started working into my motorcycle 'routine' and I'm actually more comfortable while riding than I was before.

The only reason I docked this book a star is that a few of his articles, you'll notice that they talk about the same thing. At least once, I thought "Haven't I read this article before?"
Stayin' Safe Jan. 5 2013
By Kenneth J. Aiken - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
There's an old saying: there are two kinds of motorcyclists, those that have gone down, and those that are going to. No matter how competent we believe ourselves to be, each one of us has room for improvement. Yet, when put to the ultimate test, how many of us are fully prepared?

Lawrence Grodsky earned the nickname "Mr. Safety" because of his passion for improving the riding skills of fellow motorcyclists. One of the ways he shared his knowledge was by establishing his Stayin' Safe Motorcycle Training program. Another was his editorial column in Rider magazine that was published from October 1988 through July 2006.

Seventy seven of Larry's editorials were selected by his friend and co-instructor Pete Tamblyn for this memorial book. These editorials are not chronological, but grouped according to subject. An especially nice touch is the short introductions to each column that were written by people who were connected to these stories. I think Tamblyn deserves a round of applause for this arrangement and augmentation of Larry's original work.
Stayin' Safe is not a novel, and it's best when read a column or two at a time. While many of these pieces are entertaining, most contain a considerable amount of information that require time to absorb and contemplate. Larry didn't limit his crusade for motorcycle safety to mere theory, but was hands-on as an instructor. He tested theories, accepting neither his own, those of the Motorcycle Safety Foundation, or even championship winning motorcyclists. Furthermore, he was fully engaged in sharing the results regardless of whether that meant sacrificing a sacred cow or shooting himself in the foot. Titles are forthright - Stopping On A Curve, The Toughest Skill In Motorcycling, Chasing the Vanishing Point, and . . . well, you get the idea. Not every chapter, nor every column in a given chapter, will resonate with every rider, but within the hard covers of this book there's something of critical relevance for each of us.

Being a motorcycle journalist, a rider of many years, and a graduate of both the advanced Motorcycle Safety Course and Penguin Race School still wasn't enough to prevent me from low siding my Beemer. Perhaps control of my fishtailing machine could have been regained if I had read (and practiced) "Braking Techniques." Larry began this column by writing, "I hope you never have an accident--but if you do it's even money that you'll have bungled the braking." Unfortunately, I have to agree with him and now am resolved to spend time practicing some of the techniques he suggests.

Not all accidents are preventable. "On the Horns of a Dilemma," which appeared in the September 2002 issue, is about his collision with a whitetail deer on Route 22 outside of Antrium, Ohio. The R1150GS remained upright and he would later acknowledge, "One can hardly count the ways in which I lucked out." He stated in this article that, "Adult white-tails can sprint up to 36 mph - that's 53 feet per second." He used the close encounter (as he used everything) to illustrate safety issues, but he knew the odds and had a premonition that Bambi would be his nemesis. "The reality is, there's no magic bullet. Even if you can see 12 seconds ahead and stop in four, a deer could jump out of the bushes a half second in front of you." Larry's life ended on the night of April 8, 2006 outside Fort Stockton, Texas when he collided with a deer while riding home on a recently purchased 1997 Kawasaki police bike.

Each time we mount our bikes we're playing against the odds of having an accident. To ignore this fact is to court disaster. The only valid method for improving these odds is the knowledge and skills we learn and apply each time we mount our motorcycles. Stayin' Safe is one book that should be read by ALL motorcyclists, veterans and newbies alike.


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