• List Price: CDN$ 32.95
  • You Save: CDN$ 12.30 (37%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Stick and Rudder: An Expl... has been added to your Cart
+ CDN$ 6.49 shipping
Used: Acceptable | Details
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Visibly worn from excessive use but readable copy. May be an ex-library copy and may not include CD and/or Accessories.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Stick and Rudder: An Explanation of the Art of Flying Hardcover – Sep 22 1990


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 20.65
CDN$ 19.23 CDN$ 8.77
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

Amazon.ca First Novel Award - 6 Canadian Novels Make the Shortlist


Frequently Bought Together

Stick and Rudder: An Explanation of the Art of Flying + Weather Flying, Fifth Edition
Price For Both: CDN$ 38.17

One of these items ships sooner than the other.

Buy the selected items together


Product Details

  • Hardcover: 390 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Professional; 1 edition (Sept. 22 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0070362408
  • ISBN-13: 978-0070362406
  • Product Dimensions: 22.1 x 2.5 x 23.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 612 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (44 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #31,440 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

From the Back Cover

WHAT'S IN STICK AND RUDDER:


* The invisible secret of all heavier-than-air flight--the Angle of Attack. What it is, and why it can't be seen. How lift is made, and what the pilot has to do with it.
* Why airplanes stall
* How do you know you're about to stall?
* The landing approach. How the pilot's eye functions in judging the approach. The visual clues by which an experienced pilot unconsciously judges: how you can quickly learn to use them.
* "The Spot that does not move." This is the first statement of this phenomenon. A foolproof method of making a landing approach across pole lines and trees.
* The elevator and the throttle. One controls the speed, the other controls climb and descent. Which is which?
* The paradox of the glide. By pointing the nose down less steeply, you descend more steeply. By pointing the nose down more steeply, you can glide further.
* What's the rudder for? The rudder does NOT turn the airplane the way a boat's rudder turns the boat. Then what does it do?
* How a turn is flown. The role of ailerons, rudder, and elevator in making a turn.
* The landing--how it's made. The visual clues that tell you where the ground is.
* The "tail-dragger" landing gear and what's tricky about it. This is probably the only analysis of tail-draggers now available to those who want to fly one.
* The tricycle landing gear and what's so good about it. A strong advocacy of the tricycle gear written at a time when almost all civil airplanes were taildraggers.
* Why the airplane doesn't feel the wind. Why the airplane usually flies a little sidewise.
* Plus: a chapter on Air Accidents by Leighton Collins, founder and editor of AIR FACTS. His analyses of aviation's safety problems have deeply influenced pilots and aeronautical engineers and have contributed to the benign characteristics of today's airplane.

FLAP COPY

STICK AND RUDDER is the first exact analysis of the art of flying ever attempted. It has been continously in print for thirty-three years, and has enjoyed steadily increasing sales. Flight instructors have found that the book does indeed explain important phases of the art of flying, in a way the learner can use. It shows precisely what the pilot does when he flies, just how he does it, and why.

These basics are largely unchanging. The book therefore is applicable to large airplanes and small, old airplanes and new, and is of interest not only to the learner but also to the accomplished pilot and to the instructor himself.

When STICK AND RUDDER first came out, some of its contents were considered highly controversial. In recent years its formulations have become widely accepted. Pilots and flight instructors have found that the book works.

Today several excellent manuals offer the pilot accurate and valuable technical information. But STICK AND RUDDER remains the leading think-book on the art of flying.

One thorough reading of it should be the equivalent of many hours of practice.

About the Author

Wolfgang Langewiesche first soloed in 1934 in Chicago. Early in his flying he was struck by a strange discrepancy: in piloting, the words and the realities did not agree. What pilots claimed to be doing in flying an airplane, was not what they did in practice. Langewiesche set himself the task of describing more accurately and realistically what the pilot really does when he flies. The first result was a series of articles in Air Facts, analyzing various points of piloting technique. In 1944 Stick and Rudder was published.


Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
Get rid at the outset of the idea that the airplane is only an air-going sort of automobile. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. E. Robinson on Jan. 21 2004
Format: Hardcover
My suggestion is to read this book first if you are thinking of taking flying lessons.
If and when you start flying lessons you of course will pilot the plane and become familiar with the controls, but during the flying lessons in the air you will also be involved in dealing with what seems like an overwhelming amount of other information. The plane seems small and strange. It is cramped and a bit noisy. There are many instruments. Often you will be thrown about if there is some weather. And the instructor might be yelling command plus you must communicate with others by radio. So there are many things unfamiliar and they must be absorbed and then the lesson is over quickly - or so it seems. All of the details are important but before you start it helps if you can develop an intuitive feel for how a plane moves and is lifted in the air.
The aim of the book is to explain in simple terms the physics of flight and to develop within the reader an intuitive feel for air flight. Flying is a three dimensional activity and does not come easily or obviously. The ideas about the control of flight can become somewhat intuitive if you read this book. It presents flying in its basics without the hype - in a way in which you can visualize flying - and can start develop the intuition and the appreciation.
Four or five stars.
Jack in Toronto.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dave English on April 21 2002
Format: Hardcover
"Get rid at the outset of the idea that the airplane is only an air-going sort of automobile. It isn't. It may sound like one and smell like one, and it may have been interior decorated to look like one; but the difference is -- it goes on wings."
Still the best way to get the fundamentals straight. In the 1930's test pilot Wolfgang noticed that the words and the realities of piloting did not seem to agree. After careful thought, he published a series of articles for Air Facts magazine that analyzed the true actions of stick and rudder. The book was released in 1944 and has been in print ever since. Some of the writing shows its age -- I don't think any flight instructor will talk about the airplane's flippers -- but the actual actions of the flight controls has not changed. If you are a pilot and you don't have this book, you need to add it to your professional bookshelf.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Paul De Zan on June 15 2002
Format: Hardcover
58 years ago, Wolfgang Langewiesche published this unparalleled masterpiece. By the time he passed on last February at the age of 94, literally hundreds of thousands of both new and experienced pilots had learned the profound truths of aviation from "Stick and Rudder." It is, quite simply, the ONLY book that explains everything a pilot does and why he must do it. Certainly there are elements of "Stick and Rudder" that are in need of an update, and the writing style is rather "classical" to contemporary eyes, but there is wisdom here that you will not find anywhere else. One of the most essential books ever written about anything!
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on Dec 20 2003
Format: Hardcover
This is one of the most time-tested, authoritative texts in coupling the theory of flight to your actions in the cockpit. And it has not equations or complex concepts - written for you and me, this book will keep the engineers and the non-engineers hooked! The explanation for angle of attack is simply beautiful- the importance of the angle of attack can not be understanted. And the understanding you will gain from this book will help you fly every day.
I highly recommend this book!
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Hardcover
Early in my flight training I found a copy of S&R, read it through twice by the time I did my first solo....thank you very much! My instructor and I were doing T&Gs at the municipal airport next to the pulp and paper mill when he headed me out of the circuit to a small grass strip about 10 miles northwest to practice emergency approaches. As I lined up on final at near 200' dropping flap my instructor had me look off the starboard quarter at the wood-chip belching stack of the pulp and paper mill back by the airport. Yep, the smoke was drifting stiffly at 090 and guess what my heading was? Power up, keep the nose steady until I'd gained enough alt to start dumping flap. Ok, doing it right the second time I headed back to the airport as my instructor instructed me, as only an Ex RCAF Halifax WILL DO....¥#%^£ So, Lesson learned? NOT!!!! Settling into the routine and settling down after a few more T&Gs I was shocked when he had me come to a full stop, jumped out and told me to go back to the strip to review my emergency approaches....reminding me, ¥#%^£ of the usefulness of that 500' smoking wind-sock at the mill! Off to the strip! Now, having read through S&R, twice, I had been fascinated with what Wolfgang had written about "Counter Intuitive"actions. How many mishaps, upon investigation, had found the yolk either pulled out or nearly pulled right out of the instrument panel? Planes going down? Well, I can just LIFT IT UP by yanking on the yolk, right? Not so fast Bud! Speed = Lift right, after all what's a take-off all about anyway? Amazing how throttle and wings work together eh? Especially in the hands of a proficient pilot!Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most recent customer reviews



Feedback