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Stolen Away: The True Story Of Californias Most Shocking Kidnapmurder [Mass Market Paperback]

Michael Newton
2.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

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Book by Newton, Michael

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Customer Reviews

2.3 out of 5 stars
2.3 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
2.0 out of 5 stars Intriguing crime but not written well July 20 2001
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I first began reading true crime books when I was a sophomore in High School. Although I cannot recall the author, I will never forget the name of the book: Perfect Victim. The book was about the shocking kidnap and brutal sexual torture suffered by Colleen, (I believe the last name was Stanton), at the hands of the young couple who abducted her. Since that time nearly four years ago, I have read nearly two dozen true crime books, my favorite among them being In Cold Blood by Truman Capote and Bitter Blood by Jerry Bledsoe. When I purchased the book Stolen Away, I was looking forward to reading it, because not only was it about the first use of the controversial insanity defense, but it also occurred in the late 1920's, and I have always considered history to be one of my favorite subjects. I felt the author, however, didn't do a sufficient job of telling the henioius story of how young Marion Parker was abducted and killed. I almost stopped reading the book during the first few chapters when the only topic covered for page after page was the mental problems that the killer's mother had endured throughout most of her life. I knew a brief mention of it was important in understanding why the defendant ended up the way in which he did, but I began to feel the book was written about Eva Hickman instead of her son, Edward. Although this, among a few other things, is what stands out as being one of the most disappointing elements of reading this book, I felt the biggest letdown was the fact that the author told all the important facts of the story in the very beginning and left no room for the climax that I have always looked forward to in every other true crime story I have read. This book was a major disappointment, and it has made me decide to never buy another Michael Newton book again.
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1.0 out of 5 stars This guy should be locked up. Sept. 19 2001
Format:Mass Market Paperback
If there was ever an advocate for the mentally disturbed is is the author of this book.
After reading most of Mr. Newton's books one major theme keeps popping up. Criminals are good and should be worshipped and the Police are bad. What is this guy on?
If you're a big fan of the common criminal you should really enjoy this book. If, however, you are normal, you might want to skip this one.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Stolen Away--Excellent! April 6 2002
By A Customer
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I wasn't sure what this book was about when I picked it up. I had never heard of the case. Soon after I found myself reading it nonstop. It was well-written and full of information. Michael Newton did a great job.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.4 out of 5 stars  8 reviews
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Intriguing crime but not written well July 20 2001
By Kathleen - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I first began reading true crime books when I was a sophomore in High School. Although I cannot recall the author, I will never forget the name of the book: Perfect Victim. The book was about the shocking kidnap and brutal sexual torture suffered by Colleen, (I believe the last name was Stanton), at the hands of the young couple who abducted her. Since that time nearly four years ago, I have read nearly two dozen true crime books, my favorite among them being In Cold Blood by Truman Capote and Bitter Blood by Jerry Bledsoe. When I purchased the book Stolen Away, I was looking forward to reading it, because not only was it about the first use of the controversial insanity defense, but it also occurred in the late 1920's, and I have always considered history to be one of my favorite subjects. I felt the author, however, didn't do a sufficient job of telling the henioius story of how young Marion Parker was abducted and killed. I almost stopped reading the book during the first few chapters when the only topic covered for page after page was the mental problems that the killer's mother had endured throughout most of her life. I knew a brief mention of it was important in understanding why the defendant ended up the way in which he did, but I began to feel the book was written about Eva Hickman instead of her son, Edward. Although this, among a few other things, is what stands out as being one of the most disappointing elements of reading this book, I felt the biggest letdown was the fact that the author told all the important facts of the story in the very beginning and left no room for the climax that I have always looked forward to in every other true crime story I have read. This book was a major disappointment, and it has made me decide to never buy another Michael Newton book again.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Well Researched and Absorbing June 8 2005
By Sauropod - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback|Verified Purchase
I don't know why one of the other reviewers claims that Michael Newton shows sympathy for the young murderer, Edward Hickman. Although Newton clearly believes that the prosecution's psychiatrists were biased against Hickman, he in no way suggests that Hickman was anything other than a twisted, arrogant, and reckless psychopath. The background involving Hickman's family lasts only one chapter and is obviously relevant to the case.

Newton did his homework, drawing on trial transcripts to give us a thorough review of this shocking homicide. The only thing that surprised me was that he does not seem to have read In Defense of the Fox, a memoir by Hickman's attorney, which would have shed additional light on the topic. Still, I think anyone who enjoys reading about crime, punishment, and old-time Hollywood will be rewarded by this book.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting case, not interesting writing. March 20 2005
By Diana H. - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I had heard about the Marion Parker kidnapping/murder years ago in an old book about L.A. history. It was a short paragraph or two and I hadn't run into anything more about it until I saw this book. Michael Newton, the writer that brought us the disturbing "Daddy was the Black Dahlia Killer" is up to his old tricks in this book as well. Too much detail, too little editing in it. The story is worth the read but beware, there are way too many pages of history that matters little (imho) to the crime. Is Mr. Newton trying to explain why this young man would murder a little girl? Perhaps. I didn't buy it though. Anyway, worth a read to those, like myself, who love true crime and early Los Angeles.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Stolen Away--Excellent! April 6 2002
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I wasn't sure what this book was about when I picked it up. I had never heard of the case. Soon after I found myself reading it nonstop. It was well-written and full of information. Michael Newton did a great job.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quite A Story Sept. 19 2013
By So. Calif book reader - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback|Verified Purchase
I don't remember Newton for or against Hickman when reading this book. I think it was just the account of the kidnap/murder of Marion Parker a 12 year old girl in 1927 by William Edward Hickman, a young man who went bad, as they called it. His lawyer's claimed 'innocent by reason of sanity' which was a fairly new plea back in those days, and I was constantly confused because sometimes it sounded as if he was, and other times not. I personally concluded that he was not. He started out such a promising youth, but went off the deep end. Personally, if any part of him went insane to me-it was when he converted to Catholicism prison. This I do not understand, him having been brought up Baptist. I would find much more solace in being Baptist. My opinion only. At any rate, the poor young man and his victim are not forgotten.
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