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Stolen Lives Hardcover – Large Print, Sep 1 2001


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Hardcover, Large Print, Sep 1 2001
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--This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 431 pages
  • Publisher: Wheeler Publishing; Lrg edition (September 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1587240904
  • ISBN-13: 978-1587240904
  • Product Dimensions: 22.8 x 15.4 x 2.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 785 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (160 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,309,200 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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Format: Paperback
If this had been a book of fiction, I would have found it hard to believe, but as it is not, that makes it all the more remarkable. I found the writing a bit uneven, but I think that might be due to translation. I can highly recommend this book. It certainly makes our daily problems seem trivial and it is a testament to the human spirit and the drive to survive, no matter what the conditions.
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Format: Hardcover
Stolen Lives � Twenty Years in a Desert Jail is an important book. This is a compelling true story. It outlines the life of Malika Oufkir, daughter of Moroccan general Oufkir.
Malika Oufkir has lead a unique life. Her story does not begin with imprisonment. It begins with being taken from her parents at age five to live in the palace. She becomes the adopted daughter of the ruling monarch, Muhammad V of Morocco. Although it is never fully explained, it appears that Malika is brought to the palace to be the companion for the king�s daughter. She is distraught; her parents acquiesce. It is the first lesson in the power of the monarchy. Muhammad V dies and is replaced by his son Hassan II. You might expect Malika to be returned home. But no, Hassan might be offended if the it appears that the Oufkir family thinks less of him than of his father. And so, Malika stays in the palace. But this is just the beginning.
Eventually, Malika returns to her family as a young adult. Later General Oufkir, Malika�s father, who is also a high placed advisor to the king, leads a coup d�etat. He is killed. Now the family�s story of imprisonment begins.
The King has the family removed from Rabat by police. Throughout the story, the police, and army are used to keep the family imprisoned. Some knew the general and were sympathetic to the family. Others had lost family in the coup d�etat and were filled with hatred. The conditions for the family were continually reduced, until they were put in solitary confinement for seven years. The treatment of the Oufkir family reads like a Nazi concentration camp story, with brutal guards, arbitrary punishments, malnutrition, and the loss of humanity.
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Format: Audio Cassette
I saw an interview with Malika Oufkir on Oprah Winfrey's show and was so taken by her courage, her incredible spiritual strength and the unbelievable horror of her tale, that I felt I had to know more. I found this version to be an inspiring testimony to the human spirit but also an honest account of the terrible toll of this family's ordeal, leaving one brother "a permanent child" in Malika's own words, a brother who found adjusting to a normal, free life nearly impossible and who is still suffering the effects of his imprisonment.For their part, Oufkir and her sisters were left suspicious of men, emotionally scarred by what they survived...and yet they also managed to find the strength to serve as witnesses to their injustice and to find the courage to speak out. This is one of the most inspiring true-life accounts I've read in the last year and one I'd put on any "must read" list. If you dont know the details of Oufkir's story, here's a brief summary: At the age of 5, Malika Oufkir, eldest daughter of General Oufkir, was adopted by King Muhammad V of Morocco, a man who wanted an available playmate for his young daughter. While in the palace, Oufkir led a life of a fairy princess, in total luxury --- until her father was found guilty of treason as part of a coup to overthrow the new regime (led by King Hassan II). Malika's father was executed and she, her mother and her brother and sisters were immediately imprisoned. From one day to the next, Oufkir went from luxury to a struggle for her very existence, living in conditions that you can't believe until you read about it. There were times when one or the other would try and commit suicide (her brother when he was only 7) or be forced to eat food drenched in rat urine.Read more ›
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By Happy Changes on July 1 2001
Format: Hardcover
This book is an excellent read - a little jagged around the edges perhaps, and there could be a little more dialogue and action. But it's a remarkable testament to the human spirit, will and perservance. It reminds me how lucky I am to live in the U.S. where we take so many freedoms for granted.
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Format: Hardcover
This is one amazing book. I don't want to give the plot away. Suffice it to say that it is a story of one incredibly brave family who faced incredible odds and managed to triumph. I cried several times while reading this book. There is a sequel called "Freedom" which is not to be missed!!!
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By I LOVE BOOKS TOP 1000 REVIEWER on July 30 2008
Format: Paperback
Meet the Oufkir family. This is the printed condensation of their amazing survival.

Malika Oufikir, aided by writer Michele Fitoussi, recounts the plunge from the heights of an extremely privileged, if secluded, life, mostly lived at the Royal Moroccan court, and a life which later landed herself and her family into gaol, in 1972. A drastic change for everybody -but "drastic" is almost a diminishing adjective for what they went through-, including the two family retainers who had volunteered to share their fate. This was the result of a failed military coup against King Hassan II, led by Malika's father, General Oufkir, who was shot immediately after. Wife Fatima and their six children, aged between 19 (Malika) and 3 and a half (Abdellatif) were sent to prison. Deprivations, humiliations, isolation -even among themselves, they were not allowed to see each other for many years- lack of hygiene, food, water, medicines and contending their space with various rodents, cockroaches, scorpions, in the chilling cold or the most stifling heat, inability to see the light -they were kept in almost total darkness-. Up until the day when, 15 years later, with the resilience of the totally desperate, some of them managed to escape, Malika included. The tale of their evasion is chilling from beginning to end. But it also led to the liberation of the others left behind. Nobody could believe that the Oufkir children had reemerged from nothingness, but they managed to alert the relevant authorities, international press and word went out. They were all subsequently moved to a different location where they were still imprisoned but at least with more dignity -if one may use this term in the circumstances-. This went on for another 4 years. And then... freedom finally knocked at their door.
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